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Guillermo Mercado

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NEWS
December 1, 2000 | KEN ELLINGWOOD, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A former governor of Baja California Sur, wanted by Mexican authorities on embezzlement charges, apparently has fled to San Diego. But law enforcement officials in the United States have not yet been asked to hunt for Guillermo Mercado. The member of the long-ruling Institutional Revolutionary Party is accused, with 18 other former officials, of diverting $55 million in public funds before leaving office last year.
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NEWS
December 1, 2000 | KEN ELLINGWOOD, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A former governor of Baja California Sur, wanted by Mexican authorities on embezzlement charges, apparently has fled to San Diego. But law enforcement officials in the United States have not yet been asked to hunt for Guillermo Mercado. The member of the long-ruling Institutional Revolutionary Party is accused, with 18 other former officials, of diverting $55 million in public funds before leaving office last year.
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NEWS
September 15, 1996 | Times Wire Services
Hurricane Fausto damaged 1,700 homes as it swept northeastward across the southern tip of Mexico's Baja California before being downgraded Saturday to a tropical storm, officials said. Fausto's ranking was lowered when its winds weakened from 80 mph to 45 mph after it came ashore before dawn on the mainland near Topolobampo, a port hit hard last year by Hurricane Ismael. About 90 fishermen died when they were surprised at sea last September by Ismael.
NEWS
September 14, 1996 | From Associated Press
Hurricane Fausto battered Baja California on Friday, downing power poles, smashing windows and disrupting tourism on the usually sunny coast before speeding across the Gulf of California to menace the Mexican mainland. At least one person, a San Diego man, was reported killed when a power line toppled onto a trailer near Cabo San Lucas. More than 2,500 people, mostly in poor neighborhoods around La Paz, were evacuated to shelters at schools, the Red Cross said.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 25, 1999 | HOMERO ARIDJIS and SERGE DEDINA, Homero Aridjis is a poet and the president of International PEN. Serge Dedina is the author of the forthcoming "Saving the Gray Whale."
The most consequential political campaigns for the future of Mexico are not those being orchestrated by the dinosaurs of the long-dominant Institutional Revolutionary Party, or PRI, or by members of the opposition parties. The campaign with the greatest implication for democracy in Mexico is the one being waged over the gray whale--a marine mammal that spends each winter in the secluded Pacific lagoons of Baja California.
NEWS
November 13, 1993 | PATRICK J. McDONNELL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
More than a week after a freak storm dumped almost two feet of rain on the Los Cabos resort zone of southern Baja, the all-important tourism industry appears to be on the rebound, as restaurants and shops finish cleaning up and new visitors arrive. However, hundreds of area inhabitants remain homeless, major roads are blocked, water service is spotty and some areas still look like a disaster zone. Damage is estimated at $35 million.
OPINION
March 12, 1995 | Homero Aridjis, Homero Aridjis is president of the environmental Group of 100 and author of the forthcoming novel, "The Lord of the Last Days: Visions of the Year 1000."
At a time when there seems no end to Mexico's economic crisis, a head-on collision between business interests, backed by state authorities, and respect for Mexico's environment, and the laws designed to protect it, is shaping up. Crudely put, a victory for the business interests would amount to a trade-off of gray whales for cash that would not even trickle down to the pockets of those who are supposed to receive it.
NEWS
March 6, 1995 | JUANITA DARLING, TIMES STAFF WRITER
As Baja California residents celebrate the California gray whales' annual arrival at birthing grounds along the peninsula's shores, environmentalists warn that the most pristine of the four bays that become whale nurseries each winter is seriously threatened. A salt company that shares the whales' winter home is planning to more than double a mining operation that already makes Mexico the world's second-largest salt exporter.
NEWS
February 16, 1999 | JAMES F. SMITH, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Along a curving white-sand bay framed by austere desert mountains, the billboards for the beachfront condos proclaim "Act Now--Only 42 Available" and "Location, Location, Location." The signs aren't in Spanish. They are in plain realtor's English. Although the Mexican Constitution forbids foreigners to directly own land within 30 miles of the coast, they can hold it through trusts. And English is the preferred language for pushing these home sites 800 miles south of the U.S.
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