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ENTERTAINMENT
April 27, 2013
Yeah Yeah Yeahs "Mosquito" (Interscope) When the Yeah Yeah Yeahs began making records in 2001, it would've been difficult to imagine the band someday doing a song as "Like a Prayer"-ish as "Sacrilege," the first track on its new album. "Falling for a guy, fell down from the sky," frontwoman Karen O sings over a descending guitar figure, "Halo round his head, feathers in our bed. " Later in the tune a gospel choir shows up - as one did during the group's performance at Coachella - and pushes "Sacrilege" into true-blue power-in-the-midnight-hour territory.
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ENTERTAINMENT
April 25, 2013 | By Robert Abele
A girl with a guitar, a roommate without a job and a drummer with a crush make up the boho trio at the center of "The Crumbles," writer-director Akira Boch's low-key multiethnic rock 'n' roll doodle about the ups and downs of Echo Park artistic strivers. Darla (Katie Hipol) works at a bookstore and dreams of rock glory, so when flighty keyboardist friend Elisa (Teresa Michelle Lee) crashes on her couch after a bad breakup, the pair start the titular band. That's about it, really, save for Elisa's party-hearty flakiness irritating Darla, flirtations between the gals and Jeff Torres' lanky, sad-eyed drummer, and occasional visits with the neighbors making a microbudget sci-fi movie.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 22, 2013 | By Randy Lewis
This post has been updated. See note below for details. Richie Havens, the veteran folk singer whose frenetic guitar strumming and impassioned vocals made him one of the defining voices and faces of Woodstock, and by extension, of 1960s pop music, died Monday of a heart attack at his home in New Jersey, his publicist said in a statement. He was 72. The Brooklyn native with the powerhouse ripsaw voice was the opening act at the festival billed as “Three Days of Peace and Music” in upstate New York in August 1969, and galvanized rock fans as they trekked in to the festival site from across the Eastern Seaboard and throughout the country.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 15, 2013 | By Randall Roberts, Los Angeles Times Pop Music Critic
This post has been updated. See below for details.  The riff that San Francisco rock band Thee Oh Sees presented at 3:50 p.m. at the closing moments of their rolling, frantic set, was still running through my head half an hour later, even though half a dozen rhythms from varying locales on the pitch of Coachella had entered it since. That's one tough damn riff, from a new song called "Dead Energy," bass-heavy, smooth-groove house beats 50 yards away in the Sahara tent. The band played a forceful bunch of songs -- at least judging by the four final ones that I saw -- that drove the tightly focused, crowd-surfing fans to adrenaline levels unimaginable the morning earlier.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 13, 2013 | By Mikael Wood
INDIO -- The primary story out of Coachella in 2012 was dance music, the handiwork of oxygen-gobbling sets by superstar DJs such as David Guetta and Swedish House Mafia. And electronic beats are definitely a part of the mix at this year's festival. Witness the addition of a brand-new dance-music tent, Yuma, and the expansion of the Sahara, where Moby and Benny Benassi are scheduled to perform Saturday. But on Coachella's flagship main stage Friday night, guitars made a comeback in the music of Modest Mouse and Yeah Yeah Yeahs, scrappy indie-rock bands gone big. And they figured prominently in performances by the evening's headliners, beat-friendly Brit-pop giants Blur and the Stone Roses.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 11, 2013
Passion Pit, best known for its anthemic hits "Sleepyhead" and "Little Secrets," has gained a devoted audience with affection for singer Michael Angelakos' soaring falsetto and gymnastic vocal runs. The band is adept at transforming studio creations into human-centered performances, moving from instrument to instrument throughout its set. Sometimes, the group belts out guitar, bass, drum and synth jams; other times, all the members are on synthesizers. Club Nokia, 800 W. Olympic Blvd., L.A. 8 p.m. Thurs.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 8, 2013 | By Jamie Wetherbe
Comedic actor Jack Black and composer Andrew Lloyd Webber could soon have a bond. The seven-time Tony winner said he'd like to bring Black's comedy "School of Rock" to the stage. Lloyd Webber told CBC Radio that he was “very excited” about recently acquiring the rights to the 2003 film, which starred Black as a cash-strapped musician-turned-teacher who transforms a prep school class into a rock band. "There may be songs for me in it,” he said of the potential score, “but it's obviously got songs in it as it stands.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 23, 2013
Chances are this guitar has nothing to weep about. A Vox electric guitar said to have been played by John Lennon and George Harrison - along with some jewelry given by Elvis Presley to associates and an autographed pillow Michael Jackson threw to a fan - are among a bevy of rock 'n' roll memorabilia items coming up for auction May 18 in New York. The one-of-a-kind Vox guitar was played by Lennon during a video recording session for the song "Hello Goodbye," and by Harrison while he was practicing "I Am the Walrus" for the "Magical Mystery Tour" film, according to Julien's Auctions, which will host the sale.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 22, 2013 | By Randy Lewis
A Vox electric guitar said to have been played by John Lennon and George Harrison, jewelry given by Elvis Presley to associates and an autographed pillow Michael Jackson threw to a fan from a Paris hotel window are among a bevy of rock 'n' roll memorabilia items coming up for auction May 18 in New York. The one-of-a-kind Vox guitar was played by Lennon during a video recording session for the song “Hello Goodbye,” and by Harrison while he was practicing “I Am the Walrus” for the “Magical Mystery Tour” film, according to Julien's Auctions, which will host the sale at the Hard Rock Café in Times Square.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 14, 2013 | By Randy Lewis
There are few people so well suited to pull a song out of a recent sequence of surreal events than Texas country rocker Joe Ely. Ely had a one-of-a-kind custom guitar stolen from him 27 years ago, and he recently learned that it had turned up. On Tuesday night at a gig in San Francisco, the instrument was returned to him by Matt Wright of Merced, Calif., who'd bought it at a pawn shop years earlier, discovering later who the rightful owner was....
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