Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsGulf Oil Co
IN THE NEWS

Gulf Oil Co

FEATURED ARTICLES
BUSINESS
October 28, 1994 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Chevron Wins Pension Ruling: A federal appeals court ruled that 44,000 former Gulf Oil Co. workers are not entitled to the money that existed in a pension plan when Gulf was purchased by Chevron Corp. in 1984. The U.S. 5th Circuit Court of Appeals in New Orleans found that nothing in federal law or the Gulf pension plan prohibited Chevron from merging the fund into its own pension plan in 1986.
ARTICLES BY DATE
BUSINESS
October 28, 1994 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Chevron Wins Pension Ruling: A federal appeals court ruled that 44,000 former Gulf Oil Co. workers are not entitled to the money that existed in a pension plan when Gulf was purchased by Chevron Corp. in 1984. The U.S. 5th Circuit Court of Appeals in New Orleans found that nothing in federal law or the Gulf pension plan prohibited Chevron from merging the fund into its own pension plan in 1986.
Advertisement
NEWS
May 30, 1985
The State Department said it is not satisfied with South Africa's explanation for having its commandos in Angola. South Africa said two commandos who were killed and a third who was captured were gathering intelligence on guerrillas. But the captured commando told a news conference in Luanda, the Angolan capital, that the commandos were not checking on guerrillas but were trying to sabotage Gulf Oil Co. petroleum tanks and other facilities.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 27, 2002 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Harrison Smith Glancy, 98, who won a swimming gold medal and set a world record at the 1924 Olympics as part of a relay team that included Johnny Weissmuller, died Sunday of heart failure at his home in New Orleans. A native of Ben's Run, W.Va., Glancy and his family moved to Pittsburgh when he was 14. It was there that he took up swimming after working as a towel boy at a local health club.
NEWS
June 15, 1985 | NORMAN KEMPSTER, Times Staff Writer
The United States recalled its ambassador to South Africa on Friday to protest the Pretoria regime's military raid on neighboring Botswana and other recent cross-border military actions, including a foiled mission apparently intended to sabotage a U.S.-owned oil-processing facility in Angola. By summoning Ambassador Herman W. Nickel home for "consultations," the U.S. government adopted a diplomatic sanction recognized as only a step short of a formal break in relations.
BUSINESS
November 25, 1987 | From Reuters
British food and drink company Allied-Lyons PLC said Tuesday that it would expand its 51% ownership and take full control of one of the best-known names in distilling, Canada's Hiram Walker-Gooderham & Worts Ltd., in a cash and share deal worth $1.01 billion. Allied-Lyons is buying the interest from Toronto-based GW Utilities Ltd., a private development firm controlled by Olympia & York Developments Ltd. GW Utilities will acquire a 10% stake in Allied-Lyons in the deal.
BUSINESS
April 28, 1990 | From Associated Press
Gov. Robert P. Casey on Friday signed the nation's toughest anti-takeover law, saying it would discourage corporate raiders from stripping jobs and economic vitality from Pennsylvania. Within hours, the law was challenged by two suits filed in federal court that claimed unconstitutional infringement on shareholder and investor rights. Analysts expect that the law, which took effect immediately, will create ripples in boardrooms and legislatures throughout the nation.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 9, 2008 | From the Associated Press
By the time Bill Hargrove was recognized last year as the nation's oldest league bowler, his eyesight had deteriorated so much that he could hardly see the pins. But he kept at it, armed with a mental image of them. He was still bowling last week, just before he was hospitalized with pneumonia at Northeast Georgia Medical Center in Gainesville, Ga. Hargrove died of congestive heart failure Monday -- four days shy of turning 107. A native of Eatonton, Ga.
NEWS
January 8, 1986 | United Press International
American oil workers today challenged President Reagan's authority to order them out of Libya and said they might not be able to comply with a Feb. 1 deadline for leaving the country even if they wanted to. Most Americans reacted calmly to the threat to jobs that pay them an average of $96,000 a year. After speaking by radio with his workers on oil rigs, one supervisor said they did not seem impressed or excited. "They asked me how things are, and I said everything is fine," he said.
BUSINESS
September 20, 1990 | PAUL AMES, ASSOCIATED PRESS
After 15 years of an economically devastating civil war, oil-rich Angola may find itself on the winning end of the conflict in the Persian Gulf. The southwestern African nation derives 90% of its export earnings from oil production, and experts say the recent run-up in crude prices on worldwide markets could bring a windfall in profits. The light crude from Angola's oil-producing center in Cabinda province already has risen to as much as $32 a 42-gallon barrel since the Aug.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|