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NEWS
December 17, 2012 | By Matea Gold
WASHINGTON - Gun control advocates who have long struggled to match the political clout of groups such as the National Rifle Assn. say the anguish and outrage spurred by Friday's deadly massacre at a Newtown, Conn., elementary school is powering a groundswell of support for their cause. “As somebody who has worked on this for 17 years, there is something very different about this,” said Brian Malte, director of mobilization for the Brady Campaign to Prevent Gun Violence . “We are getting an unprecedented amount of donations, of people wanting to volunteer.” He declined to say how much money had come in. Another big shift: Malte said the organization is fielding calls from members of Congress asking to meet with the group.
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NATIONAL
January 14, 2013 | By Michael Muskal
A month after an elementary school massacre pushed gun control back onto the public agenda, some of the key proposals being discussed remain a sore point between Democrats and Republicans, though two ideas are backed by large, bipartisan majorities, according to a poll released Monday. About 85% of surveyed Americans favor background checks for private gun sales and transactions at gun shows, according to the Pew Research Center for the People and the Press. Four out of five Americans favor laws to prevent the mentally ill from buying weapons.
NEWS
December 19, 2012 | By Paul Whitefield
Is it too soon to be advocating for new gun control measures? It isn't for President Obama, as he showed Wednesday with his announcement of a task force on the issue to be headed by Vice President Joe Biden. But some people want to use the old “haste makes waste” argument to delay action. SLIDESHOW: The 10 trigger-happiest states in America Take Times Op-Ed columnist Jonah Goldberg, for example, in his piece Tuesday, “ Mourn first, then act ,” about the Newtown, Conn., shootings.
NEWS
April 17, 2013 | By Paul Whitefield
On Tuesday, I wrote about two senators' bipartisan plan to expand background checks on gun buyers, saying it was a common-sense measure and should pass. On Wednesday, its sponsors -- Democratic Sen. Joe Manchin III of West Virginia, an NRA member, and Republican Sen. Patrick J. Toomey of Pennsylvania -- all but conceded they don't have the votes. Thus, 26 children and teachers slaughtered in Newtown, Conn., and 12 people gunned down at a movie theater in Aurora, Colo.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 23, 2013 | By Robin Abcarian
Like a lot of people who follow the gun debate, I was surprised to learn earlier this year that for more than a decade, Congress has made it nearly impossible for our premier federal health research institutions to study gun violence. That became evident when President Obama announced his series of executive orders in response to the tragedy at Sandy Hook Elementaryschool in Newtown, Conn. In one of those orders, he directed the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention and other scientific agencies in the Department of Health and Human Services to “conduct or sponsor research into the causes of gun violence and the ways to prevent it.” HHS Secretary Kathleen Sebelius, he directed, “shall begin identifying the most pressing research questions with the greatest potential public health impact, and by assessing existing public health interventions being implemented across the Nation to prevent gun violence.” With more than 30,000 gun deaths a year, plus an additional 75,000 or so gun injuries, how is it possible the feds weren't already studying the phenomenon?
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