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BUSINESS
January 13, 2010 | By Tom Petruno
DoubleLine Capital, formed by star bond fund manager Jeffrey Gundlach after he was fired by L.A. money management firm TCW Group last month, on Tuesday registered to launch its first three mutual funds for individual investors. Gundlach, who is in a vicious legal battle with TCW, hopes to lure investors from the TCW funds he had managed for the last decade, including TCW's retail flagship, Total Return Bond fund. In a filing with the Securities and Exchange Commission, DoubleLine applied to launch its own Total Return Bond fund, which like TCW Total Return Bond would invest primarily in mortgage-backed bonds.
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BUSINESS
November 7, 2012 | By Andrea Chang
Jeffrey Gundlach, one of the world's top bond gurus, has taken a big swipe at Apple. The bond fund manager is predicting that Apple's stock, down more than 20% since Sept. 19, could fall as low as $425 a share. Shares declined $22.20, or 3.8%, to $558 on Wednesday. Just a couple of months ago, analysts were predicting Apple's stock could hit $800, possibly even $1,000, a share. Gundlach, now chief executive of DoubleLine Capital, said in an interview with CNBC that he didn't understand everyone's "obsession" with Apple stock, which he began shorting in April.
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BUSINESS
September 25, 2012 | By Pat Benson
Bond king Jeffrey Gundlach has offered a $1.7-million reward for the safe return of artworks stolen recently from his Santa Monica home. The stolen pieces, worth an estimated $10 million, included some of the biggest names in contemporary art: Piet Mondrian, Jasper Johns and Richard Diebenkorn. What happens to art after it's stolen? Join us for a live video chat today at 4:30 p.m. with retired FBI agent Robert K. Wittman, who wrote the book "Priceless: How I Went Undercover to Rescue the World's Stolen Treasures.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 27, 2012 | By Joe Bel Bruno and Mike Boehm
Jeffrey Gundlach said Thursday that an estimated $10 million in 20th century art that was burglarized from his Santa Monica home has now been safely returned, and that police told him they have arrested two suspects. The wealthy bond trader, who's considered one of the world's most prominent investment fund managers, had posted a $1.7-million reward for the return of works by Piet Mondrian, Jasper Johns, Richard Diebenkorn, Joseph Cornell and others. He had discovered Sept. 14 that they were missing, after returning from a short business trip.
BUSINESS
March 28, 2012 | By Tiffany Hsu
The days of easy double-digit gains in stocks and other securities are coming to an end, says PIMCO's Bill Gross, the best-known bond manager in the world - but bonds are still “critical components of an investment portfolio.” Consider the classic 1963 Steve McQueen film “The Great Escape,” in which American POWs are trapped in a German prison camp during World War II. There, “the living conditions were OK … but certainly not what...
BUSINESS
January 12, 2010 | By Tom Petruno
Fired TCW Group investment chief Jeffrey Gundlach struck back at the Los Angeles money management firm Monday after it filed a lawsuit accusing him of stealing proprietary information and being unfit for his former post. Less than two weeks after TCW dismissed him Dec. 4, Gundlach launched rival DoubleLine Capital with about 40 former TCW employees who bolted after he was ousted. In a letter to clients and potential clients, Gundlach denounced TCW's "scorched-earth legal policy."
BUSINESS
September 8, 2011 | Bloomberg News
Money manager Jeffrey Gundlach testified in a trial against TCW Group Inc. over his 2009 firing that he had negotiated, in contracts going back to 1992, specific conditions under which the firm could terminate him "for cause. " "I wanted to make sure I couldn't be fired out of the blue," Gundlach told jurors Wednesday in state court in Los Angeles. He also said that since 1989, he was entitled to accrued compensation if he was fired by TCW. Gundlach, 51, who worked at TCW for 25 years and was named Morningstar's fixed income manager of the year in 2006, says the Los Angeles-based unit of Societe Generale fired him to avoid having to pay management and performance fees for the distressed-asset funds that his group managed and that went "through the roof.
BUSINESS
September 25, 2012 | By Pat Benson
Who would steal art, and who would buy it? We asked stolen art expert Robert K. Wittman that question after thieves stole artworks owned by bond king Jeffrey Gundlach.  Gundlach has offered a $1.7-million reward for the safe return of the stolen pieces, worth an estimated $10 million. Works by Piet Mondrian, Jasper Johns and Richard Diebenkorn were taken. Wittman, a former FBI agent, wrote the book "Priceless: How I Went Undercover to Rescue the World's Stolen Treasures.
BUSINESS
July 22, 2011 | By Tom Petruno, Los Angeles Times
A Los Angeles courtroom is about to become a venue for Wall Street's dirty laundry. In a trial expected to be closely watched by the financial industry, L.A. money management giant TCW Group is suing its former chief investment officer, Jeffrey Gundlach, alleging that he and his aides conspired to steal massive amounts of TCW proprietary information in 2009 to set up a rival firm. Gundlach, a star bond fund manager, has denied TCW's allegations and has countersued. The 51-year-old math whiz accuses his former employer of firing him to cheat him out of a huge chunk of promised income.
BUSINESS
August 12, 2011 | By Tom Petruno, Los Angeles Times
Star Los Angeles bond fund manager Jeffrey Gundlach found his character on trial as he took the stand for the first time in his high-stakes court battle with his former employer, money management giant TCW Group Inc. TCW's lead attorney, John Quinn, sought to convince the jury Thursday that Gundlach was disloyal to TCW and to his own longtime fund co-manager and that Gundlach's conduct left the firm little choice but to oust him in December 2009....
BUSINESS
September 25, 2012 | By Pat Benson
Bond king Jeffrey Gundlach has offered a $1.7-million reward for the safe return of artworks stolen recently from his Santa Monica home. The stolen pieces, worth an estimated $10 million, included some of the biggest names in contemporary art: Piet Mondrian, Jasper Johns and Richard Diebenkorn. What happens to art after it's stolen? Join us for a live video chat today at 4:30 p.m. with retired FBI agent Robert K. Wittman, who wrote the book "Priceless: How I Went Undercover to Rescue the World's Stolen Treasures.
BUSINESS
September 25, 2012 | By Pat Benson
Who would steal art, and who would buy it? We asked stolen art expert Robert K. Wittman that question after thieves stole artworks owned by bond king Jeffrey Gundlach.  Gundlach has offered a $1.7-million reward for the safe return of the stolen pieces, worth an estimated $10 million. Works by Piet Mondrian, Jasper Johns and Richard Diebenkorn were taken. Wittman, a former FBI agent, wrote the book "Priceless: How I Went Undercover to Rescue the World's Stolen Treasures.
BUSINESS
September 24, 2012 | By Joe Bel Bruno
Star bond trader Jeffrey Gundlach will announce a new, potentially momentous reward for the safe recovery of a trove of art stolen earlier this month from his Santa Monica residence, a person familiar with the matter said. The founder of DoubleLine Capital is currently offering $200,000 for the return of art that includes works by Mondrian, Joseph Cornell, Jasper Johns and Richard Diebenkorn. The new reward, which will be announced at a 1 p.m. news conference on Monday, is expected to be among the highest paid for stolen art, the person said.
BUSINESS
September 24, 2012 | By Stuart Pfeifer, Mike Boehm and Walter Hamilton, Los Angeles Times
Even by Hollywood standards, the audacious art heist from the home of a wealthy L.A. money man is an intriguing whodunit. Jeffrey Gundlach, one of the world's top bond gurus, has offered a $1.7-million bounty for the safe return of a cherished collection stolen from his Santa Monica home last week. The $10-million haul included some of the biggest names in contemporary art: Piet Mondrian, Jasper Johns and Richard Diebenkorn. On Monday, Gundlach took the unusual step of holding a news conference in downtown Los Angeles to announce one of the highest rewards on record for the return of stolen art. He set aside $1 million of the reward money for a Mondrian piece, which one art-theft expert said was the most ever offered for a single painting.
BUSINESS
September 20, 2012 | By Andrew Blankstein and Joe Bel Bruno, Los Angeles Times
Star bond fund manager Jeffrey Gundlach is used to winning, but he just suffered a $10-million hit in the most unexpected way. Returning to his posh Santa Monica home after a business trip to New York this week, he found a blank space on the wall where a cherished landscape by William Wendt once hung. He then noticed more blank spaces where he had part of his multimillion-dollar art collection. The crooks even drove away in his red Porsche Carrera - and shut the garage door on the way out. Gundlach, heralded on Wall Street for his bond investing prowess, is the founder of DoubleLine Capital in Los Angeles.
BUSINESS
March 28, 2012 | By Tiffany Hsu
The days of easy double-digit gains in stocks and other securities are coming to an end, says PIMCO's Bill Gross, the best-known bond manager in the world - but bonds are still “critical components of an investment portfolio.” Consider the classic 1963 Steve McQueen film “The Great Escape,” in which American POWs are trapped in a German prison camp during World War II. There, “the living conditions were OK … but certainly not what...
BUSINESS
September 17, 2011 | By Tom Petruno and Tiffany Hsu, Los Angeles Times
He was cast as the epitome of Wall Street greed, but in the end a jury sided with star money manager Jeffrey Gundlach's claim that he wasn't paid enough. In a bitter court battle that pitted Gundlach against his longtime employer, Los Angeles investment giant TCW Group Inc., jurors delivered verdicts Friday that left both sides claiming victory. The panel largely agreed with TCW's side of the case, yet ordered the firm to write a $67-million check to Gundlach and three lieutenants for back pay, while TCW's own demand for damages was denied.
BUSINESS
September 20, 2012 | By Andrew Blankstein and Joe Bel Bruno, Los Angeles Times
Star bond fund manager Jeffrey Gundlach is used to winning, but he just suffered a $10-million hit in the most unexpected way. Returning to his posh Santa Monica home after a business trip to New York this week, he found a blank space on the wall where a cherished landscape by William Wendt once hung. He then noticed more blank spaces where he had part of his multimillion-dollar art collection. The crooks even drove away in his red Porsche Carrera - and shut the garage door on the way out. Gundlach, heralded on Wall Street for his bond investing prowess, is the founder of DoubleLine Capital in Los Angeles.
BUSINESS
December 30, 2011 | By Joe Bel Bruno
Star bond trader Jeffrey Gundlach and his former employer, TCW Group Inc., said they settled a lawsuit over his firing in 2009 and allegations that he stole trade secrets to set up his own firm. The two sides issued a joint statement but did not release terms of the deal. FOR THE RECORD: An earlier version of this article said the settlement pertained to one part of the case. TCW said it covers all claims. TCW, the Los Angeles-based money management unit of French banking giant Societe Generale, and Gundlach were locked in an often bitter court battle this year.
BUSINESS
September 17, 2011 | By Tom Petruno and Tiffany Hsu, Los Angeles Times
He was cast as the epitome of Wall Street greed, but in the end a jury sided with star money manager Jeffrey Gundlach's claim that he wasn't paid enough. In a bitter court battle that pitted Gundlach against his longtime employer, Los Angeles investment giant TCW Group Inc., jurors delivered verdicts Friday that left both sides claiming victory. The panel largely agreed with TCW's side of the case, yet ordered the firm to write a $67-million check to Gundlach and three lieutenants for back pay, while TCW's own demand for damages was denied.
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