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Gunter Grass

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OPINION
April 12, 2012
Israel's high ground Re "Israel's poetry critics," Editorial, April 10 German poet Gunter Grass and I both inhabited the same country during World War II. The difference between us: I wore striped pajamas in concentration camps, and he wore the gray uniform of the Waffen SS. I ask Grass: Why does he consider Israel a threat to world peace? Israel was not accepted by its neighbors when it was established in 1948 and was threatened with annihilation. Pronouncements by Iranian leaders denying the Holocaust and their threats to destroy the Jewish state are of great concern.
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ENTERTAINMENT
February 6, 2014 | By Hector Tobar
On the day before the Winter Olympics officially open in Russia, more than 200 authors, including several Nobel laureates, have called on President Vladimir Putin to repeal laws that limit freedom of expression and create a climate of fear among writers. The letter , drafted by PEN International, declares that “during the last 18 months, Russian lawmakers have passed a number of laws that place a chokehold on the right to express oneself freely in Russia. As writers and artists, we cannot stand quietly by as we watch our fellow writers and journalists pressed into silence or risking prosecution and often drastic punishment for the mere act of communicating their thoughts.” The signatories include Margaret Atwood, Gunter Grass, Orhan Pamuk, Salman Rushdie and Wole Soyinka.
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BOOKS
July 28, 1996
Come, fog, o come! Make us anonymous. We have been caught red-handed in the (undone) act. Our salad wilts with too much of the salt it lacked, as guileless as once Blum, our Minister, was, expecting guests that others pay for, raising no objections. We lived on credit, privileged and certain, but somebody (a God?) who lifts the long fog's curtain has leaked the figures for the next elections.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 2, 2013 | By David L. Ulin, Los Angeles Times Book Critic, This post has been corrected. See note below for details.
When André Schiffrin - who died in Paris on Sunday of pancreatic cancer at age 78 - was fired in 1990 as editor in chief of Pantheon Books, it was regarded as a loud shot in the war between commercialism and quality in American publishing. There were protests, op-ed pieces; in response, Schiffrin's bosses pointed out that Pantheon had lost $3 million in his last year at the helm. In his nearly three decades at the imprint, Schiffrin worked with writers including Jean-Paul Sartre, Marguerite Duras and Gunter Grass, but in the end, he was brought down by his unwillingness to scale back his list or reduce his staff.
BOOKS
August 20, 1989 | Sara Suleri
"The work startles both in its density of detail and in its overarching anticipation of its own self-chosen task. The spectacle of Third World Poverty--its gaudy declaration of need--is by now surely too familiar a Western stereotype to generate any sense of novelty, but Grass' powerful meditation explodes the stereotypical in order to address the nature of the cliches in which he may be complicit."
BOOKS
July 21, 1985 | Art Seidenbaum, Seidenbaum is The Times' Opinion editor.
Fiction, like freedom, is supposed to be in trouble. Most people, according to other people, want information, want logical methods for dealing with reality rather than literary means of escape. That's why, say these same other people, Lee Iacocca's auto biography outsells John Irving's novel by so many orders of magnitude. Many artists mourn the hunger for data but live with a corollary notion, accepting its limitation on their work: that imagination suffers when politics or urgency intrudes.
OPINION
April 10, 2012
The people in Israel and Germany who are most outraged by Nobel Prize-winning author Gunter Grass' latest work have one thing in common: They think it's ridiculous, and possibly anti-Semitic, for Grass to assert a moral equivalency between Israel and Iran. Yet by overreacting to Grass' criticism, Israeli officials are acting like, well, Iranians. Grass, 84, is being lambasted in his native Germany over his poem "What Must Be Said," published last week in the German newspaper Sueddeutsche Zeitung.
OPINION
April 14, 2012
The Times' editorial on Tuesday discussing Israel'sreaction to Gunter Grass' poem on a possible confrontation with Iran prompted reader Steven Zak of Sunland to write: "The Times argues that by 'overreacting' to Grass' poem, Israelis 'are acting like Iranians.' More accurately, The Times is acting like Grass, who defames Israel as a 'perpetrator' of 'recognized danger.' The Times does likewise by comparing Israelis with Iran's regime. "When Grass calls the established fact of Iran's weapons program 'unproven,' he sounds like the Iranians, who both deny the Holocaust and vow to repeat it. Anyone who thinks Israel's condemnation of such a man is 'the kind of reaction we'd expect from Iran's mullahs' is ignorant about how those mullahs deal with dissent.
BOOKS
February 6, 2000 | JONATHAN LEVI, Jonathan Levi is a contributing writer to Book Review
"If I start a novel that begins this week in Berlin or Dusseldorf," Gunter Grass said on a visit to New York in 1965, "I always have to go back to the beginning of the century." So it had been with Grass' masterpiece, "The Tin Drum," which opened with the now-famous scene of the narrator's grandmother hiding an escaped convict beneath her skirts in a Kashubian potato field at the tail end of the 19th century. And so it is now, with the Nobel laureate's latest work, "My Century."
NEWS
March 18, 2002 | CAROL J. WILLIAMS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In a mere 216 pages, German author Gunter Grass has delivered a blockbuster novel, shed a reputation for resting on 40-year-old laurels, reconciled left and right factions long at odds over the Nazi past and exposed a World War II tragedy virtually buried for half a century. Like most explorations of Germany's 20th century history, "Im Krebsgang" (Crabwalking), is more a political evolution than a literary event.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 2, 2013 | By Hector Tobar
My first resolution for 2013 is one many bibliophiles make. And it's also the resolution I'm least likely to complete to my satisfaction this year: I'm going to organize my book collection. The other things on my list are easy: Finish a book? I've got just a few chapters left on the one I'm writing now, my fourth. Keep off the weight I lost last year? With a little will power and lots of tofu and vegetables, that'll be a piece of cake. The status of my book collection, however, is a very nearly unfixable disaster.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 7, 2012 | By Elaine Woo, Los Angeles Times
Michael Henry Heim, a literary translator and humble philanthropist whose teaching, activism and widely admired translations of works by such writers as Günter Grass and Milan Kundera helped bring the voices of contemporary world literature into the mainstream of English-speaking cultures, has died. He was 69. Heim, a professor and former chairman of the department of Slavic languages and literature at UCLA, died of cancer Sept. 29 at his home in Westwood, said his wife, Priscilla.
OPINION
April 17, 2012
The off-target NRA Re "NRA is restless despite clout," April 13 Why is the National Rifle Assn. afraid of President Obama? The gun-rights group can't name one time when Obama has said a word about gun control after any of the massacres that have taken place since he's been in office. He hasn't said a word about it even after the shooting death of Trayvon Martin. The NRA is about stoking fear and looking for an enemy. I wish Obama and the Democrats would say more about gun control, but they remain silent.
OPINION
April 14, 2012
The Times' editorial on Tuesday discussing Israel'sreaction to Gunter Grass' poem on a possible confrontation with Iran prompted reader Steven Zak of Sunland to write: "The Times argues that by 'overreacting' to Grass' poem, Israelis 'are acting like Iranians.' More accurately, The Times is acting like Grass, who defames Israel as a 'perpetrator' of 'recognized danger.' The Times does likewise by comparing Israelis with Iran's regime. "When Grass calls the established fact of Iran's weapons program 'unproven,' he sounds like the Iranians, who both deny the Holocaust and vow to repeat it. Anyone who thinks Israel's condemnation of such a man is 'the kind of reaction we'd expect from Iran's mullahs' is ignorant about how those mullahs deal with dissent.
OPINION
April 12, 2012
Israel's high ground Re "Israel's poetry critics," Editorial, April 10 German poet Gunter Grass and I both inhabited the same country during World War II. The difference between us: I wore striped pajamas in concentration camps, and he wore the gray uniform of the Waffen SS. I ask Grass: Why does he consider Israel a threat to world peace? Israel was not accepted by its neighbors when it was established in 1948 and was threatened with annihilation. Pronouncements by Iranian leaders denying the Holocaust and their threats to destroy the Jewish state are of great concern.
OPINION
April 10, 2012
The people in Israel and Germany who are most outraged by Nobel Prize-winning author Gunter Grass' latest work have one thing in common: They think it's ridiculous, and possibly anti-Semitic, for Grass to assert a moral equivalency between Israel and Iran. Yet by overreacting to Grass' criticism, Israeli officials are acting like, well, Iranians. Grass, 84, is being lambasted in his native Germany over his poem "What Must Be Said," published last week in the German newspaper Sueddeutsche Zeitung.
BOOKS
June 24, 2007 | Natasha Randall, Natasha Randall is a critic and the translator, most recently, of Yevgeny Zamyatin's "We" for Modern Library.
GUNTER GRASS has put himself in the line of fire again. The first time was when he served in the German army in 1944. This time, it is with the publication of his memoir, "Peeling the Onion," that the Nobel laureate has launched himself into a space that leaves him open to attack. The first time, he was the 17-year-old youth who "saw himself as a man, was interested in military hardware." Now he is exposing a crucial and damning detail of his past, one that he has long suppressed.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 3, 2008 | ASSOCIATED PRESS
Becky Saletan, the senior vice president and publisher of adult trade books at Houghton Mifflin Harcourt, has quit. Spokesman Josef Blumenfeld confirmed Tuesday that Saletan had resigned, but declined further comment. Saletan couldn't be reached for comment. Saletan had served in the job since January 2008, when she was appointed to head the newly merged Harcourt and Houghton Mifflin divisions. The company has been in the news for an alleged hold-down on new books. Blumenfeld has offered conflicting statements, saying the publisher of authors such as Philip Roth and Gunter Grass had "temporarily stopped acquiring manuscripts."
ENTERTAINMENT
November 27, 2008 | ASSOCIATED PRESS
Reports of a buying freeze at Houghton Mifflin Harcourt is news to the publisher of one its imprints. "I don't work at the Harcourt offices so I called to find out if the story was true," Otto Penzler, whose Otto Penzler Books specializes in mystery books and releases six to eight titles per year, said Wednesday. Penzler was referring to media stories alleging that Houghton Mifflin Harcourt (HMH) had temporarily stopped acquiring new books. "I was told that it had been blown out of proportion and that there was simply some belt-tightening going on. I asked, 'Does this mean I can keep buying books?
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