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Guy Maddin

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ENTERTAINMENT
November 12, 2013 | By Randy Lewis
A film translation of “The Seduction of Ingmar Bergman,” a 2009 radio drama by L.A. pop duo Sparks turned 2010 concept album turned 2011 sparsely staged theatrical production, is moving forward with Canadian director Guy Maddin at the helm. Sparks lead singer Russell Mael made the announcement Monday night during the twosome's homecoming performance with his brother (keyboardist and songwriter Ron Mael) at the Fonda Theatre in Hollywood to wrap the North American leg of their 2013 tour, which also brought the eccentric pair to the Coachella Valley Music & Arts Festival last spring.
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ENTERTAINMENT
November 12, 2013 | By Randy Lewis
A film translation of “The Seduction of Ingmar Bergman,” a 2009 radio drama by L.A. pop duo Sparks turned 2010 concept album turned 2011 sparsely staged theatrical production, is moving forward with Canadian director Guy Maddin at the helm. Sparks lead singer Russell Mael made the announcement Monday night during the twosome's homecoming performance with his brother (keyboardist and songwriter Ron Mael) at the Fonda Theatre in Hollywood to wrap the North American leg of their 2013 tour, which also brought the eccentric pair to the Coachella Valley Music & Arts Festival last spring.
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NEWS
June 7, 2007 | Kenneth Turan, Times Staff Writer
GUY MADDIN'S "Brand Upon the Brain!" is arriving in Los Angeles this weekend, but don't imagine that just another film is showing up. It's more like the circus is coming to town. And a very weird circus at that. "A one-of-a-kind cinematic spectacle!" scream the heroically retro print ads for the live-action-and-film extravaganza at the Egyptian Theatre in Hollywood from Friday to Monday night, adding, as if it were necessary, "You'll never see anything like it again!"
ENTERTAINMENT
June 26, 2008 | Kenneth Turan
Guy Maddin is an alternative cinema legend. His one-of-a-kind films, such as "The Saddest Music in the World" and "Brand Upon the Brain," are the products of an unmistakable sensibility. He calls "My Winnipeg" a "docu-fantasia" and there's no reason not to take him at his word. This haunting phantasmagoria of a film -- comic, surreal -- is not only something no one but the Canadian director could have made, it's also a film no one else would have even wanted to make.
NEWS
January 20, 2005 | Kevin Thomas, Times Staff Writer
After quietly reopening Santa Monica's much-loved Aero Theater on Montana Avenue two weeks ago, the American Cinematheque now presents its first series -- "Like a Waking Dream: An In-Person Tribute to Director Guy Maddin" -- at its newest venue. It's safe to say that as one of the last neighborhood theaters in the Los Angeles area, the Aero in its 60-plus years has never screened anything like a Maddin movie. But then there isn't anything like a Maddin movie, period.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 20, 2008 | Kenneth Turan, Times Movie Critic
Guy Maddin calls his "My Winnipeg" a "docu-fantasia," and there's no reason not to take him at his word. This haunting phantasmagoria of a film -- comic, singular, surreal -- is not only something no one but the Canadian director could have made, it's also a film no one else would have even wanted to make. Which is the heart of its appeal. Maddin, an alternative cinema legend for one-of-a-kind films like "The Saddest Music in the World" and "Brand Upon the Brain!
ENTERTAINMENT
February 25, 2007 | Susan King, Times Staff Writer
THE UCLA Film and Television Archive has long wanted to audiences to know just how rich and diverse a collection it is. "Even though we program throughout the year, we hardly even tap the depth of the collection," says Cheng-Sim Lim, co-head of exhibitions and public programs at the archive. "We are constantly surprised by what we have in the collection."
ENTERTAINMENT
May 7, 2004 | Manohla Dargis, Times Staff Writer
Wrapped in a nimbus of nostalgia and reclaimed glamour, the films of Guy Maddin look like movies I should have seen in childhood (but didn't), when I basked in the light of my family's TV. Well into the 1970s, New York City television offered up an astonishing array of old movies that, while often shown in battered and nearly transparent prints, opened up worlds of wonder.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 26, 2008 | Kenneth Turan
Guy Maddin is an alternative cinema legend. His one-of-a-kind films, such as "The Saddest Music in the World" and "Brand Upon the Brain," are the products of an unmistakable sensibility. He calls "My Winnipeg" a "docu-fantasia" and there's no reason not to take him at his word. This haunting phantasmagoria of a film -- comic, surreal -- is not only something no one but the Canadian director could have made, it's also a film no one else would have even wanted to make.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 27, 2003 | Manohla Dargis, Times Staff Writer
Straight out of Canada by way of Transylvania, "Dracula -- Pages From a Virgin's Diary" ranks among the more eccentric wonders of the new-movie world. A wittily revisionist adaptation of the Bram Stoker classic and a passionate kiss to a lost cinematic past, the film was directed by Guy Maddin, performed by members of the Winnipeg Royal Ballet and looks like a lost silent-movie masterpiece -- albeit one that would never have been shot.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 20, 2008 | Kenneth Turan, Times Movie Critic
Guy Maddin calls his "My Winnipeg" a "docu-fantasia," and there's no reason not to take him at his word. This haunting phantasmagoria of a film -- comic, singular, surreal -- is not only something no one but the Canadian director could have made, it's also a film no one else would have even wanted to make. Which is the heart of its appeal. Maddin, an alternative cinema legend for one-of-a-kind films like "The Saddest Music in the World" and "Brand Upon the Brain!
NEWS
June 7, 2007 | Kenneth Turan, Times Staff Writer
GUY MADDIN'S "Brand Upon the Brain!" is arriving in Los Angeles this weekend, but don't imagine that just another film is showing up. It's more like the circus is coming to town. And a very weird circus at that. "A one-of-a-kind cinematic spectacle!" scream the heroically retro print ads for the live-action-and-film extravaganza at the Egyptian Theatre in Hollywood from Friday to Monday night, adding, as if it were necessary, "You'll never see anything like it again!"
ENTERTAINMENT
February 25, 2007 | Susan King, Times Staff Writer
THE UCLA Film and Television Archive has long wanted to audiences to know just how rich and diverse a collection it is. "Even though we program throughout the year, we hardly even tap the depth of the collection," says Cheng-Sim Lim, co-head of exhibitions and public programs at the archive. "We are constantly surprised by what we have in the collection."
NEWS
January 20, 2005 | Kevin Thomas, Times Staff Writer
After quietly reopening Santa Monica's much-loved Aero Theater on Montana Avenue two weeks ago, the American Cinematheque now presents its first series -- "Like a Waking Dream: An In-Person Tribute to Director Guy Maddin" -- at its newest venue. It's safe to say that as one of the last neighborhood theaters in the Los Angeles area, the Aero in its 60-plus years has never screened anything like a Maddin movie. But then there isn't anything like a Maddin movie, period.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 16, 2004 | Manohla Dargis, Times Staff Writer
One of the more rarefied of modern movie magicians, Canadian director Guy Maddin passed through Sundance Film Festival in January to present his feature "The Saddest Music in the World." Now 44, Maddin, who lives and works out of his native Winnipeg, makes richly stylized, weirdly touching, often deviously funny movies filled with smoke and mirrors and allusions to cinematic fever dreams long past. (Among his influences: Luis Bunuel, Josef Von Sternberg and Frank Borzage.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 7, 2004 | Manohla Dargis, Times Staff Writer
Wrapped in a nimbus of nostalgia and reclaimed glamour, the films of Guy Maddin look like movies I should have seen in childhood (but didn't), when I basked in the light of my family's TV. Well into the 1970s, New York City television offered up an astonishing array of old movies that, while often shown in battered and nearly transparent prints, opened up worlds of wonder.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 16, 2004 | Manohla Dargis, Times Staff Writer
One of the more rarefied of modern movie magicians, Canadian director Guy Maddin passed through Sundance Film Festival in January to present his feature "The Saddest Music in the World." Now 44, Maddin, who lives and works out of his native Winnipeg, makes richly stylized, weirdly touching, often deviously funny movies filled with smoke and mirrors and allusions to cinematic fever dreams long past. (Among his influences: Luis Bunuel, Josef Von Sternberg and Frank Borzage.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 19, 2008
Brick Lane | A Bangladeshi woman forced into an arranged marriage in London awakens to the possibilities of life when she begins an affair. Get Smart | Secret agent 86 attempts to outwit the evil criminal mastermind Siegfried and KAOS. Kit Kittredge: An American Girl | The story of a bright and imaginative 10-year-old in Depression-era Cincinnati. The Love Guru | A foundling left at an ashram in India returns to the U.S. as a self-help and spirituality authority. My Winnipeg | A portrait of Canadian filmmaker Guy Maddin's hometown, Winnipeg, Manitoba.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 27, 2003 | Manohla Dargis, Times Staff Writer
Straight out of Canada by way of Transylvania, "Dracula -- Pages From a Virgin's Diary" ranks among the more eccentric wonders of the new-movie world. A wittily revisionist adaptation of the Bram Stoker classic and a passionate kiss to a lost cinematic past, the film was directed by Guy Maddin, performed by members of the Winnipeg Royal Ballet and looks like a lost silent-movie masterpiece -- albeit one that would never have been shot.
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