Advertisement
 
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsGuy Williams
IN THE NEWS

Guy Williams

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
May 8, 1989 | JOHN H. LEE, Times Staff Writer and
Guy Williams, the actor who starred in the popular 1950s television series "Zorro," has died in Buenos Aires, Argentina, authorities there said Sunday. He was 65. Williams' body was found by police Saturday in his apartment in the exclusive residential neighborhood of La Recoleta. He apparently suffered a heart attack and died about a week ago, the government news agency Telam reported. An investigation was begun to confirm the exact cause of death. The 6-foot, 3-inch second-generation Italian-American, whose real name was Armando Catalano, was chosen by Walt Disney Studios to portray Zorro on the small screen in a role made famous in motion pictures by Douglas Fairbanks Sr. and later by Tyrone Power.
ARTICLES BY DATE
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 11, 2004 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Guy Williams, 71, an eclectic, self-taught modernist artist and teacher whose work was handled by the Kiyo Higashi Gallery in Los Angeles, died Feb. 24 at Cottage Hospital in Santa Barbara after a lengthy illness. A native of San Diego, Williams taught at Chouinard Art Institute, Pomona College and UC Santa Barbara. He exhibited in group and one-man shows at Los Angeles Municipal Art Gallery, UC Santa Barbara, UC Berkeley and Santa Barbara Museum of Art.
Advertisement
NEWS
May 8, 1989 | From Associated Press and
Guy Williams, the actor who played Zorro in the popular 1950s Walt Disney television series of the same name, apparently suffered a heart attack and died in his apartment, police said Sunday. He was 65. Williams' body was found by police at his home in the exclusive residential neighborhood of La Recoleta. He apparently died about a week ago, the government news agency Telam reported. An investigation was begun to confirm the cause of death. Williams, whose real name was Armando Catalano, was born in New York.
SPORTS
January 28, 1997 | EARL GUSTKEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
But for a wrong turn taken on her road to dreamland, she, too, would have been an Atlanta Dreamer, celebrating at that gold-medal party the U.S. women's basketball team threw for itself last summer. She knows that now, and the smile Natalie Williams wears when talking about her muffed chance is a rueful one. In 1994, at UCLA, Williams was wrapping up one of the great individual women's basketball careers in NCAA history. Then she made a decision that seemed peculiar at the time . . .
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 11, 2004 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Guy Williams, 71, an eclectic, self-taught modernist artist and teacher whose work was handled by the Kiyo Higashi Gallery in Los Angeles, died Feb. 24 at Cottage Hospital in Santa Barbara after a lengthy illness. A native of San Diego, Williams taught at Chouinard Art Institute, Pomona College and UC Santa Barbara. He exhibited in group and one-man shows at Los Angeles Municipal Art Gallery, UC Santa Barbara, UC Berkeley and Santa Barbara Museum of Art.
BOOKS
December 23, 1990
I am researching the life of Guy Williams for a tribute book. Known around the world as the romantic masked rider, Zorro, he gave us a timeless rendition of a legend--and thus, became a legend himself. If anyone has any information, anecdotes, letters, pictures (especially from 1920s-'40s), or anything to relate, please contact me. ANTOINETTE G. LANE P.O. Box 675 San Pedro, CA 90734
ENTERTAINMENT
November 18, 1988 | CATHY CURTIS
Guy Williams has negotiated a smooth transit into the late '80s with work that adds subtle pleasures to the big-scale immediacy of vivid color and three-dimensional block letters. The subtleties are contained in the stop-and-start rhythms of a scribble pattern that disports itself on pieced and layered rectangular sheets of paper all painted a single hue.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 22, 1989 | ALEENE MacMINN, Arts and entertainment reports from The Times, national and international news services and the nation's press
The dinner reservation for Tuesday evening at a Santa Monica restaurant was in the name of the "Robinson" family. Getting together were the actors who portrayed the Robinsons in the 1960s CBS series, "Lost in Space," plus the real-life family of Guy Williams, the actor who starred as Professor John Robinson. They wanted to share their happy memories of Williams, who was found dead of an apparent heart attack May 7 in Buenos Aires. "Guy's professional family took his real family out to toast poppa," said June Lockhart, who co-starred as Williams' wife.
SPORTS
January 28, 1997 | EARL GUSTKEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
But for a wrong turn taken on her road to dreamland, she, too, would have been an Atlanta Dreamer, celebrating at that gold-medal party the U.S. women's basketball team threw for itself last summer. She knows that now, and the smile Natalie Williams wears when talking about her muffed chance is a rueful one. In 1994, at UCLA, Williams was wrapping up one of the great individual women's basketball careers in NCAA history. Then she made a decision that seemed peculiar at the time . . .
ENTERTAINMENT
May 21, 1989
Guy Williams, who died this month, was talented, handsome and charismatic--the perfect Zorro, with a subtle touch of humor and fencing finesse. I first saw him as Zorro in 1957-59 when I was about 12. I rediscovered him 15 months ago when I got the Disney Channel. Like the legend he portrayed, he will live on. In his films he will bring enjoyment to yet a new generation 30 years from now. Adios, amigo! ANTOINETTE GIRGENTI LANE San Pedro
NEWS
June 25, 1992 | CATHY CURTIS, Cathy Curtis covers art for The Times Orange County Edition.
"Whassamatta, can't the guy draw right? These look like cartoons by some dumb 10-year-old! My kid could . . . Who? This William Anthony guy, whose drawings and paintings are at this new place in Laguna Beach, Stuart Katz's Loft. Somebody said this guy studied art at Yale in the '50s with Joseph Albers. Aw, come on. That guy was famous for making pictures of squares. "Yeah, yeah, Anthony's stuff has been slobbered over by the hoity-toity New York art press.
BOOKS
December 23, 1990
I am researching the life of Guy Williams for a tribute book. Known around the world as the romantic masked rider, Zorro, he gave us a timeless rendition of a legend--and thus, became a legend himself. If anyone has any information, anecdotes, letters, pictures (especially from 1920s-'40s), or anything to relate, please contact me. ANTOINETTE G. LANE P.O. Box 675 San Pedro, CA 90734
ENTERTAINMENT
February 2, 1990 | MARLENA DONOHUE
By now Los Angeles knows Santa Barbara artist Guy Williams as a maker of loosely structured, intellectually astute geometric paintings. A painter's painter, Williams' work has always reflected a belief that colored paint conscientiously handled was content enough for art. Given this, his new work and his new medium come as a particularly enticing change.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 22, 1989 | ALEENE MacMINN, Arts and entertainment reports from The Times, national and international news services and the nation's press
The dinner reservation for Tuesday evening at a Santa Monica restaurant was in the name of the "Robinson" family. Getting together were the actors who portrayed the Robinsons in the 1960s CBS series, "Lost in Space," plus the real-life family of Guy Williams, the actor who starred as Professor John Robinson. They wanted to share their happy memories of Williams, who was found dead of an apparent heart attack May 7 in Buenos Aires. "Guy's professional family took his real family out to toast poppa," said June Lockhart, who co-starred as Williams' wife.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 21, 1989
Guy Williams, who died this month, was talented, handsome and charismatic--the perfect Zorro, with a subtle touch of humor and fencing finesse. I first saw him as Zorro in 1957-59 when I was about 12. I rediscovered him 15 months ago when I got the Disney Channel. Like the legend he portrayed, he will live on. In his films he will bring enjoyment to yet a new generation 30 years from now. Adios, amigo! ANTOINETTE GIRGENTI LANE San Pedro
NEWS
May 8, 1989 | JOHN H. LEE, Times Staff Writer and
Guy Williams, the actor who starred in the popular 1950s television series "Zorro," has died in Buenos Aires, Argentina, authorities there said Sunday. He was 65. Williams' body was found by police Saturday in his apartment in the exclusive residential neighborhood of La Recoleta. He apparently suffered a heart attack and died about a week ago, the government news agency Telam reported. An investigation was begun to confirm the exact cause of death. The 6-foot, 3-inch second-generation Italian-American, whose real name was Armando Catalano, was chosen by Walt Disney Studios to portray Zorro on the small screen in a role made famous in motion pictures by Douglas Fairbanks Sr. and later by Tyrone Power.
NEWS
June 25, 1992 | CATHY CURTIS, Cathy Curtis covers art for The Times Orange County Edition.
"Whassamatta, can't the guy draw right? These look like cartoons by some dumb 10-year-old! My kid could . . . Who? This William Anthony guy, whose drawings and paintings are at this new place in Laguna Beach, Stuart Katz's Loft. Somebody said this guy studied art at Yale in the '50s with Joseph Albers. Aw, come on. That guy was famous for making pictures of squares. "Yeah, yeah, Anthony's stuff has been slobbered over by the hoity-toity New York art press.
NEWS
May 8, 1989 | From Associated Press and
Guy Williams, the actor who played Zorro in the popular 1950s Walt Disney television series of the same name, apparently suffered a heart attack and died in his apartment, police said Sunday. He was 65. Williams' body was found by police at his home in the exclusive residential neighborhood of La Recoleta. He apparently died about a week ago, the government news agency Telam reported. An investigation was begun to confirm the cause of death. Williams, whose real name was Armando Catalano, was born in New York.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|