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Gypsum Canyon

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 20, 1989
A dump in Gypsum Canyon would cover 500 acres, or one-half of Orange County's rare Tecate cypress forest ("Supervisors Identify Four Possible Landfill Sites," Aug. 17). Plans shown on county maps would cause Tecate cypress to diminish by a significant amount, not only for Orange County, but also for the entire species. Additional rare plants and animals, some of them candidates for federal endangered species listing, would also dwindle considerably if this plan were put into effect.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 14, 1997 | FRANK MESSINA, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Almost 10 pounds of aggressive feathered fury, Tommy the fledgling golden eagle didn't look particularly vulnerable when released early Wednesday in the hills near Gypsum Canyon. But despite his 6-foot wingspan and sharp talons and beak, wildlife experts said the 4-month-old eagle won't survive unless his parents accept him back into the nest. "He still needs them; his parents need to stay with him for a year or more," said Scott H.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 20, 1991 | TERRY SPENCER, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
The City Council on Tuesday quietly passed the final motion that will make the city's annexation of Gypsum Canyon official. Passed unanimously by a voice vote, the resolution formally set the terms of the 2,340-acre annexation, which city officials and the Irvine Co.--the canyon's owners--hope will eventually be the site of an 8,000-home development.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 5, 1992
Thank you for the article ("High Costs of Campaigning Taking a Toll," Dec. 23, Kevin Johnson and Mark Landsbaum) in which Anaheim's mayor and council members speak frankly of developers' undue influence on the city's future. Recent approval of the "Mountain Park" (Gypsum Canyon) project, and imminent approval of "Cypress Canyon" (Coal Canyon), underscore developers' outsize weight in city decisions. A whole species of wildlife, the cougar, will become extinct in Chino Hills State Park if the two developments proceed as planned.
NEWS
November 7, 1991 | JIM NEWTON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A powerful local planning agency cleared the way Wednesday for Anaheim to annex Gypsum Canyon for a housing development, and county officials signaled afterward that they may soon drop their own efforts to acquire the property. Supervisors and other officials said the board will almost certainly abandon a proposed Gypsum Canyon landfill when it takes the issue up in December.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 27, 1989 | MARY LOU FULTON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Irvine Co. is pursuing plans for a huge housing development in Gypsum Canyon, despite a pending lawsuit over the county's intention to build a jail there. The plans set up a race between the Irvine Co. and the county for the canyon, the preferred site for a county jail and a possible location for a new landfill, said Michael Ruane, director of planning for the county Environmental Management Agency.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 31, 1989 | DAVE LESHER, Times Staff Writer
The Board of Supervisors cast a final vote Wednesday designating Gypsum Canyon as the site for a new Orange County jail, despite protests from area residents and the cities of Anaheim and Yorba Linda. The 3-2 majority, identical to the original vote to select Gypsum Canyon for a jail in 1987, had been expected by opponents. Only four people spoke during the public hearing, and there was none of the sign-waving or chanting that accompanied previous decisions.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 9, 1989 | JAMES ROBBINS, Times Staff Writer
Apparently headed for a courtroom showdown, the Yorba Linda City Council unanimously approved a resolution Friday opposing a new jail in Gypsum Canyon and vowing to use "whatever means are necessary to defeat the project." Mayor Henry W. Wedaa said the city will probably file a lawsuit against the county, which is planning to build a facility in the canyon to help relieve overcrowding at the Central Men's Jail in Santa Ana. Yorba Linda would act jointly with Anaheim, Wedaa said.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 1, 1989 | LILY ENG, Times Staff Writer
In an effort to delay the county's proposed Gypsum Canyon jail, Anaheim and two other cities have sued the Board of Supervisors, claiming the county failed in several ways to consider the effects the jail will have on its surroundings. The lawsuit would force the board to reconsider the environmental impact report on the site and correct any inconsistencies with the county's general plan.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 4, 1990 | JIM NEWTON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Orange County jail overcrowding has reached a crisis, and the Board of Supervisors should immediately move forward with plans to build a massive and controversial new facility in Gypsum Canyon, a federally appointed monitor has concluded. "Although I am not advocating where the county should put the jail," monitor Lawrence Grossman wrote in an eight-page report sent to the county Monday, "because of the present crisis, the county's only reasonable alternative is to build a jail in Gypsum Canyon.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 1, 1991
Within 10 days, the Orange County Board of Supervisors will have before it yet another report on jails, this one offering suggestions for expanding inmate capacity. The report being prepared by county staff members will come at the end of a year in which, despite the county's deepening jail crisis, there were only backward steps.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 20, 1991 | TERRY SPENCER, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
The City Council on Tuesday quietly passed the final motion that will make the city's annexation of Gypsum Canyon official. Passed unanimously by a voice vote, the resolution formally set the terms of the 2,340-acre annexation, which city officials and the Irvine Co.--the canyon's owners--hope will eventually be the site of an 8,000-home development.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 17, 1991
On Nov. 7, there were three different articles in The Times regarding pending real estate developments: in Gypsum Canyon, 8,000; in Irvine, 3,850; in Huntington Beach, 4,884. A total of 16,734 new homes. Are these developments prepared or able to provide water for these additional homes without taking water from the present population? JACK E. GROTH, Newport Beach
NEWS
November 7, 1991 | JIM NEWTON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A powerful local planning agency cleared the way Wednesday for Anaheim to annex Gypsum Canyon for a housing development, and county officials signaled afterward that they may soon drop their own efforts to acquire the property. Supervisors and other officials said the board will almost certainly abandon a proposed Gypsum Canyon landfill when it takes the issue up in December.
NEWS
October 23, 1991 | JIM NEWTON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Orange County Board of Supervisors formally abandoned its pursuit of a jail in Anaheim Hills on Tuesday, ending an effort that has taken four years and cost $7.3 million, while delivering nothing in return. "It's a dark day for the people of the county of Orange," Sheriff Brad Gates, a longtime supporter of the Gypsum Canyon jail proposal, said after the board's 4-1 vote. "We had a site. Now we have no site." But jail opponents, who have fought the proposal for years, were jubilant.
NEWS
October 23, 1991 | TERRY SPENCER, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
On the heels of Orange County supervisors' vote to abandon plans for a Gypsum Canyon jail, the Anaheim City Council indicated Tuesday night that it will approve an agreement with the Irvine Co. that would transform the canyon into the 8,000-home Mountain Park development. The council is scheduled to vote on the agreement in two weeks, but comments of council members Tuesday indicated that a majority already favors the project. Still, possible hurdles remain before development can begin.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 30, 1991 | JIM NEWTON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The County Board of Supervisors on Tuesday rejected a plan that could have bottled up Anaheim's efforts to annex Gypsum Canyon, where the county hopes to build a jail. The decision, which came on a rare tie vote, removes one potential obstacle in the way of Anaheim's effort to annex the property and clear it for a huge Irvine Co. housing development, an 8,000-unit project known as Mountain Park.
NEWS
December 7, 1990 | JIM NEWTON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Irvine Co. executives, who have long opposed Orange County's plans to build a jail in Gypsum Canyon, said Thursday that they are willing to sit down with officials and consider selling the land. The company owns the 2,500-acre Gypsum Canyon site and hopes to build thousands of single-family homes there. Company officials reiterated Thursday that they are pressing ahead with those plans and have no intention of abandoning them pending any negotiations.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 18, 1991 | JIM NEWTON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Board of Supervisors Chairman Gaddi H. Vasquez proposed Thursday that the county halt its efforts to build a jail in Gypsum Canyon, a move that would kill one of the most ambitious and controversial projects ever considered by the board. The proposal was put on the board's agenda for next week, and it already appears to have the needed backing for approval.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 15, 1991 | JIM NEWTON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
County Supervisor Thomas F. Riley, who has supported construction of a new jail near Anaheim for years, formally withdrew his backing for that project Monday, collapsing the coalition that has kept it alive and setting the county on a new, uncertain course. "The tap-dancing is over," declared Supervisor Don R. Roth, who has lobbied against the Gypsum Canyon jail site first as Anaheim's mayor and for the past five years as a county supervisor.
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