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Gyula Horn

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November 1, 1994 | Carol J. Williams and Tyler Marshall
A s foreign minister in Hungary during its dramatic overthrow of the Communist order, Gyula Horn probably did more than any other political insider to dismantle the system that gave him privilege and power. The diminutive diplomat snipped the first hole in the Iron Curtain in 1989, opening Hungary's border with neutral Austria , then shrugged off East Berlin's fury when that symbolic opening became a corridor to freedom for East Germans fleeing a reform-resistant regime.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 20, 2013
Gyula Horn, 80, a former Hungarian prime minister who played a key role in opening the Iron Curtain, died Wednesday, the Hungarian government announced. He had been hospitalized in Budapest for several years. He was best known internationally for his announcement as foreign minister in 1989 that Hungary would allow East German refugees to leave the country for West Germany, one of the main events that helped end communism in Eastern Europe. Tens of thousands of East Germans had traveled to Hungary in the spring and summer of 1989 as expectations mounted that the more moderate Communist country might open its borders to the West.
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NEWS
June 5, 1994 | Associated Press
Gyula Horn, Hungary's last Communist foreign minister, was chosen on Saturday by his winning Socialist Party to be the new prime minister. Horn and his government must be confirmed by Parliament. But his Socialists, a reform wing of the former Communists, won a majority in last month's elections, virtually ensuring that he will be the new head of government.
NEWS
November 1, 1994 | Carol J. Williams and Tyler Marshall
A s foreign minister in Hungary during its dramatic overthrow of the Communist order, Gyula Horn probably did more than any other political insider to dismantle the system that gave him privilege and power. The diminutive diplomat snipped the first hole in the Iron Curtain in 1989, opening Hungary's border with neutral Austria , then shrugged off East Berlin's fury when that symbolic opening became a corridor to freedom for East Germans fleeing a reform-resistant regime.
NEWS
May 28, 1990 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Former Hungarian Foreign Minister Gyula Horn was elected president of the Hungarian Socialist Party, successor to the Communist Party. The revamped party has pledged to find its place in Hungary's new parliamentary democracy. Imre Pozsgay, considered Hungary's most influential reform politician, was elected vice president. While foreign minister, Horn played a pivotal role in help making the Berlin Wall irrelevant by permitting thousands of East German refugees to pass from Hungary to the West.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 20, 2013
Gyula Horn, 80, a former Hungarian prime minister who played a key role in opening the Iron Curtain, died Wednesday, the Hungarian government announced. He had been hospitalized in Budapest for several years. He was best known internationally for his announcement as foreign minister in 1989 that Hungary would allow East German refugees to leave the country for West Germany, one of the main events that helped end communism in Eastern Europe. Tens of thousands of East Germans had traveled to Hungary in the spring and summer of 1989 as expectations mounted that the more moderate Communist country might open its borders to the West.
NEWS
May 12, 1998 | From Times Wire Reports
Hoping to topple Prime Minister Gyula Horn's ruling Socialists, the two top opposition parties agreed to back each other in a May 24 runoff in parliamentary elections. The Socialists received 32% of the vote Sunday, the most among a dozen contenders. But the poor performance of their coalition partner--the Free Democrats, who won only 8% of the vote--appeared to leave the opposition in a potentially stronger position.
NEWS
February 27, 1989 | From Times wire services
Hungary, in an unprecedented attack by one East Bloc state against another, today demanded that the U.N. Commission on Human Rights investigate violations of basic freedoms in neighboring Romania. Gyula Horn, Hungarian state secretary for foreign affairs, delivered the demand at the commission's annual meeting.
NEWS
May 23, 1989
Premier Imre Nagy and leaders of the 1956 Hungarian uprising were "victims of show trials" and their executions were a political mistake, Hungarian Foreign Minister Gyula Horn said. The statement represented a shift in the view of the Hungarian Communist Party and appeared to open the way for Nagy's rehabilitation. Nagy had declared Hungary's neutrality and its withdrawal from the Warsaw Pact during a period of mass demonstrations that provoked a Soviet invasion on Oct. 23, 1956. Nagy and two associates were found guilty of treason in June, 1958, and executed.
NEWS
September 18, 1989 | From Times wire service s
Hungary established full diplomatic ties with Israel today, becoming the first East Bloc nation to revive relations with Jerusalem in more than 20 years. Hungary's official news agency MTI announced the move shortly after Israeli Foreign Minister Moshe Arens arrived in the capital on an official visit. MTI said an agreement on the reestablishment of diplomatic relations was signed by Arens and Hungarian Foreign Minister Gyula Horn.
NEWS
June 5, 1994 | Associated Press
Gyula Horn, Hungary's last Communist foreign minister, was chosen on Saturday by his winning Socialist Party to be the new prime minister. Horn and his government must be confirmed by Parliament. But his Socialists, a reform wing of the former Communists, won a majority in last month's elections, virtually ensuring that he will be the new head of government.
NEWS
May 28, 1990 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Former Hungarian Foreign Minister Gyula Horn was elected president of the Hungarian Socialist Party, successor to the Communist Party. The revamped party has pledged to find its place in Hungary's new parliamentary democracy. Imre Pozsgay, considered Hungary's most influential reform politician, was elected vice president. While foreign minister, Horn played a pivotal role in help making the Berlin Wall irrelevant by permitting thousands of East German refugees to pass from Hungary to the West.
NEWS
November 12, 1989 | From Reuters
Foreign Minister Gyula Horn said Saturday he believes current changes in East Germany may lead to unity with West Germany and dissolution of the Warsaw Pact and the North Atlantic Treaty Organization military alliances. "Resolution of the German issue can provide for simultaneous dismantling of the two military blocs," Horn told a news conference after talks with the foreign ministers of Austria, Yugoslavia and Italy on regional cooperation.
NEWS
November 17, 1997 | Associated Press
Voters overwhelmingly accepted NATO's invitation to membership Sunday in a show of support that the Hungarian government hopes will convince current alliance members that the cost of expansion is justifiable. With 99.5% of the votes counted, election officials said 85.3% of the ballots supported NATO membership and that 14.7% were opposed. Nearly 50% of Hungary's 8 million eligible voters participated, the National Election Center said.
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