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H D Deve Gowda

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NEWS
June 13, 1996 | From Times Wire Reports
India's new prime minister won a vote of confidence in Parliament, ending a month of turmoil caused by elections that ousted the party that ruled the country since independence. Parliament endorsed the government of Prime Minister H.D. Deve Gowda, who oversees a conglomerate of 13 parties ranging from Communists to centrists. The alliance is India's first coalition government.
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NEWS
April 12, 1997 | RONE TEMPEST, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Opening the door for possible new elections in India's increasingly fragmented democracy, Parliament on Friday roundly rejected Prime Minister H.D. Deve Gowda, a peasant farmer who served only 10 months at the head of a fragile coalition government. India's long-ruling Congress (I) Party withdrew its support from the center-left government, and Gowda lost a vote of confidence by a lopsided margin before India's lower house of Parliament, the Lok Sabha.
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NEWS
June 2, 1996 | JOHN-THOR DAHLBURG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
India got its third government in three weeks Saturday, a motley alliance mirroring the great political and social transformations underway in this diverse land, where power is shifting slowly from higher castes to lower, from New Delhi to the outlying states. H. D. Deve Gowda, 63, farmer's-son-turned-politician and former chief minister of the southern state of Karnataka, was sworn in as prime minister along with a score of Cabinet members.
NEWS
June 13, 1996 | From Times Wire Reports
India's new prime minister won a vote of confidence in Parliament, ending a month of turmoil caused by elections that ousted the party that ruled the country since independence. Parliament endorsed the government of Prime Minister H.D. Deve Gowda, who oversees a conglomerate of 13 parties ranging from Communists to centrists. The alliance is India's first coalition government.
NEWS
April 12, 1997 | RONE TEMPEST, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Opening the door for possible new elections in India's increasingly fragmented democracy, Parliament on Friday roundly rejected Prime Minister H.D. Deve Gowda, a peasant farmer who served only 10 months at the head of a fragile coalition government. India's long-ruling Congress (I) Party withdrew its support from the center-left government, and Gowda lost a vote of confidence by a lopsided margin before India's lower house of Parliament, the Lok Sabha.
NEWS
April 23, 1997 | From Times Wire Reports
New Prime Minister Inder Kumar Gujral easily won a confidence vote but now faces the more daunting task of keeping together his disparate United Front coalition. The voice vote in Parliament ended a three-week leadership crisis sparked when the powerful Congress Party withdrew support from the previous United Front government. Congress accused Gujral's predecessor, H. D. Deve Gowda, of supporting Hindu radicals and also criticized his economic policies.
NEWS
March 31, 1997 | From Associated Press
The Congress Party, which has dominated Indian politics since leading the country to independence in 1947, suddenly withdrew its support from the governing coalition Sunday, meaning new elections may be necessary for the second time in a year. Congress called on Prime Minister H. D. Deve Gowda to resign, blaming his center-left government for what it called a failure to curb Hindu nationalism and for a breakdown of law and order. Congress said it will seek to form the next government.
NEWS
April 20, 1997 | From Associated Press
India's fractious governing coalition ended weeks of paralyzing uncertainty Saturday, choosing the foreign minister to replace Prime Minister H.D. Deve Gowda, who was ousted April 11 in a no-confidence vote. Inder Kumar Gujral would be the third premier India has had since elections last year left no party with a clear parliamentary majority. Gujral's selection did not end the jockeying in Parliament. An hour afterward, a party whose leader, G.K.
NEWS
November 13, 1996 | From Reuters
Fishing boats carrying more than 300 men reached safety six days after a cyclone ravaged southeast India's coastline, but almost 1,000 others were still missing, Andhra Pradesh state officials said Tuesday. "Three hundred fifteen fishermen have been found, 985 are still missing," said Vijay Kumar, a senior official coordinating relief operations from Hyderabad, the state capital. Before news that some boats had come ashore, officials had said they feared the cyclone death toll could top 2,000.
NEWS
March 31, 1997 | From Associated Press
The Congress Party, which has dominated Indian politics since leading the country to independence, suddenly withdrew its support from the governing coalition Sunday, meaning new elections may be necessary for the second time in a year. Congress called on Prime Minister H. D. Deve Gowda to resign, blaming his center-left government for what it called a failure to curb Hindu nationalism and for a breakdown of law and order. Congress said it will seek to form the next government.
NEWS
June 2, 1996 | JOHN-THOR DAHLBURG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
India got its third government in three weeks Saturday, a motley alliance mirroring the great political and social transformations underway in this diverse land, where power is shifting slowly from higher castes to lower, from New Delhi to the outlying states. H. D. Deve Gowda, 63, farmer's-son-turned-politician and former chief minister of the southern state of Karnataka, was sworn in as prime minister along with a score of Cabinet members.
NEWS
April 21, 1997 | RONE TEMPEST, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Hoping to end a three-week political crisis and reluctant to call new elections less than a year after the last national vote, India's president on Sunday accepted Inder Kumar Gujral as the country's new prime minister. Gujral was sworn in early today.
NEWS
August 24, 1996 | JOHN-THOR DAHLBURG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
This week, India showed it could say no to the great powers. After the United States and the four other avowed nuclear-weapons nations declined to bind themselves to a timetable for liquidating their arsenals, India effectively vetoed the global nuclear test ban pact being negotiated in Geneva by refusing to sign it. International criticism was immediate, but the Indian government has vowed not to budge.
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