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BUSINESS
May 1, 1996 | John O'Dell
H. Fred Mickelson, the Edison Co. economic development guru whose name is synonymous with business retention in Orange County, is heading for greener pastures. Mickelson retires from Edison today after 40 years, and he and his wife are moving to Oregon. But Mickelson says his departure doesn't mean he's soured on Orange County, where he's lived for 10 years and worked for nearly five.
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BUSINESS
May 1, 1996 | John O'Dell
H. Fred Mickelson, the Edison Co. economic development guru whose name is synonymous with business retention in Orange County, is heading for greener pastures. Mickelson retires from Edison today after 40 years, and he and his wife are moving to Oregon. But Mickelson says his departure doesn't mean he's soured on Orange County, where he's lived for 10 years and worked for nearly five.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 29, 1993
Twenty residents are being honored by the Orange County Human Relations Commission for their efforts toward the elimination of prejudice, intolerance and discrimination and for fostering mutual understanding and respect. Alma Buis, minority affairs officer for the Fullerton Police Department, brought the community together after cultural differences, violence and drugs tore it apart. Roger Embrey, general manager of the Southern California Gas Co.
BUSINESS
August 12, 1994 | CHRIS WOODYARD, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In a major victory for forces seeking to keep businesses in Orange County, Johnson Controls Inc. has decided not to move an automotive battery plant--and 280 jobs--from Fullerton, officials said Thursday. A team of executives from the Orange County Economic Development Consortium have been meeting with Johnson managers and union representatives during the summer to find ways that the company can cut its energy costs and meet environmental regulations.
BUSINESS
July 13, 1994 | JAMES S. GRANELLI and GREG JOHNSON, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Taco Bell Corp.'s decision to keep its headquarters and 1,000 jobs in California is only a temporary arrangement that gives the company more time to evaluate its expansion needs and assess whether California is truly becoming friendlier to business, its chairman said Tuesday. John E. Martin, who is also chief executive of the Mexican-style fast-food chain, did not rule out moving to Texas or another state later, saying the company will do whatever is "best or most practical."
NEWS
June 25, 1994 | DEBORA VRANA and JAMES GRANELLI, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
After a year of uncertainty and anxiety, employees of Taco Bell Corp. and government and civic leaders throughout the state collectively cheered the fast-food chain's decision Friday to keep its headquarters--and about 1,000 jobs--in Orange County. "It's very good economic news," said Gov. Pete Wilson, who became involved in a bipartisan state and local effort to dissuade the PepsiCo.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 6, 1994
Huntington Beach City Councilman Dave Sullivan's article (Feb. 13) would have one believe that Huntington Beach will be responsible for providing all of the public services to the unincorporated Bolsa Chica area, without the benefit of receiving compensatory tax revenues, and claims the Koll Real Estate Group will renege on its commitment to restore the wetlands. The Orange County Chamber of Commerce and Industry believes his assertions are terribly misleading. First, the county will be the agency with the responsibility for providing most of the basic public services to the Bolsa Chica project, including police and fire.
BUSINESS
November 21, 1993
J. Michael Lancaster * J. Michael Lancaster has been appointed executive vice president of Coldwell Banker Residential Affiliates Inc. in Mission Viejo. He will be the officer in charge of domestic operations and will be responsible for the four U.S. regions and the Affiliate Services and Franchise Development departments. Lancaster was previously senior vice president/regional director for the western region.
NEWS
November 2, 1994 | KATHRYN BOLD
Dressing in costume proved natural for those attending the 16th anniversary dinner for Stop-Gap, a theater company that uses drama to address social problems such as child abuse and racial prejudice. Many of the 250 guests at the gala Friday at Le Meridien in Newport Beach sported costumes, capes or masks instead of the traditional black-tie attire. The $150-per-person gala raised about $40,000 for Stop-Gap.
NEWS
July 7, 1989 | JILL STEWART, Times Staff Writer
A national environmental group Thursday released a study showing that California's big utilities, which once led world conservation efforts, have cut such programs by more than half, a turnaround that the group warned could cost Californians both in energy bills and environmental damage. According to the study by the Natural Resources Defense Council, Southern California Edison Co.
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