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H L Almond

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BUSINESS
October 7, 1991 | Gregory Crouch, Times staff writer
Dennis Levine was recently sued by two Southern California men who claim that the former Wall Street inside trader duped them in an alleged advance-fee loan scheme. Levine has denied the charge. Nevertheless, ever since the economy hit the skids, advance-fee scams have quickly risen to the top of Orange County's white-collar crimes. H. L.
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BUSINESS
October 7, 1991 | Gregory Crouch, Times staff writer
Dennis Levine was recently sued by two Southern California men who claim that the former Wall Street inside trader duped them in an alleged advance-fee loan scheme. Levine has denied the charge. Nevertheless, ever since the economy hit the skids, advance-fee scams have quickly risen to the top of Orange County's white-collar crimes. H. L.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 19, 1987 | JANE APPLEGATE, Times Staff Writer
An Orange County tax preparer and his son pleaded guilty Monday in U.S. District Court to charges they defrauded more than 400 investors of an estimated $10 million. Leslie (Bill) Hawkey, Sr., 66, of Fullerton and Leslie (Biff) Hawkey Jr., 44, a lawyer in Gillette, Wyo., had been accused of mail fraud and other charges growing out of tax and investment schemes that authorities say bilked hundreds of Orange County investors who were clients of the senior Hawkey.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 11, 1985 | BOBBIE RODRIGUEZ
As a U.S. postal inspector for the past 20 years, H.L. (Bookie) Almond has seen thousands of people lose millions of dollars through mail fraud. But his last major case before his retirement, planned for April, is expected to be concluded Wednesday, when Newport Beach financier John G. Rinaldo appears in U.S. District Court in Los Angeles for sentencing.
NEWS
November 14, 1991 | GREGORY CROUCH, TIMES STAFF WRITER
From a cluttered Redondo Beach office the size of a pickup truck, Jerome Overton got a peculiar glimpse at the ravages of recession. Ten to 12 hours a day, he and his co-workers at Capital Financial Services answered phones and heard hundreds of pleas from people across the country desperate for cash. For a $75 fee, Overton says, the tiny company promised to do what it could to find callers a loan, even those with bad credit or too many bills.
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