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H L Mencken

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June 16, 2002 | BRAD LEITHAUSER, Brad Leithauser is the author of numerous books, including "Darlington's Fall: A Novel in Verse" and "The Odd Last Thing She Did: Poems."
When moved to scorn--and he was often scornful--H. L. Mencken was never at a loss for words. He lampooned "quacks" and "dolts" and "clodpolls," "snuffling publishers" and "jitney messiahs." He railed against the writers of "tosh" and "balderdash," "flubdub" and "buncombe" and "brummagem." He took aim at "skullduggery" and "numskullery" and "humbuggery." He tore into "piffle" and "blather." Even if you knew nothing of Mencken, coming to him by way of this fresh new collection, "H.L.
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December 19, 2010 | By John Lippman, Los Angeles Times
Prejudices The Complete Series H.L. Mencken 2 volume, boxed set Library of America, $70 There are writers whose books are stacked on my nightstand: G.K. Chesterton, Samuel Johnson, Thomas Babington Macaulay ? writers whom I spend half an hour with before nodding off. They are master prose stylists whose command and fluency of English are the pleasure of reading them, even if the subjects, people and times they write about are unfamiliar and distant to our contemporary minds.
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February 27, 2004 | Anthony Day, Special to The Times
Mencken's America H. L. Mencken, edited by S. T. Joshi Ohio University Press: 244 pp; $49.95 cloth, $22.95 paper * This little book, if read, could revive H.L. Mencken's reputation. It has suffered a lot in recent years. The writer inappropriately nicknamed "the sage of Baltimore" -- avuncular he never was -- routinely made insulting remarks about Jews, African Americans, Italians and other immigrants. His tirades against Franklin D. Roosevelt and the New Deal have come to look petty and dated.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 29, 2007 | From the Associated Press
Nearly 6,000 books, photographs and letters by and about H.L. Mencken have been acquired by Johns Hopkins University in Baltimore from the estate of an accountant with a penchant for the curmudgeonly journalist. George H. Thompson began collecting Mencken-related material in 1962 and continued until his death last year, said Cynthia Requardt, a curator at the Sheridan Libraries.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 29, 2007 | From the Associated Press
Nearly 6,000 books, photographs and letters by and about H.L. Mencken have been acquired by Johns Hopkins University in Baltimore from the estate of an accountant with a penchant for the curmudgeonly journalist. George H. Thompson began collecting Mencken-related material in 1962 and continued until his death last year, said Cynthia Requardt, a curator at the Sheridan Libraries.
NEWS
October 12, 1989 | MARY MAUSHARD, THE BALTIMORE EVENING SUN
Although newspaper columnist H. L. Mencken had no experience taking care of children, that didn't stop him from writing a book in 1910 about babies. The book, "What You Ought to Know About Your Baby," will be reissued in November after an updating by two Baltimore doctors. One of them, Howard Markel, insists of the work that "most of (its) information is not only valuable for its time, but remains true."
NEWS
December 5, 1989 | From Associated Press
The previously secret diary of writer and social critic H. L. Mencken discloses virulent anti-Semitism, racism and pro-Nazi leanings, shocking even the sympathetic Mencken scholar who edited it. On Mencken's instructions, the diary, typewritten on 2,100 pages from 1930 to 1948, remained sealed for 25 years after his death in 1956. The Baltimore Evening Sun, where Mencken once worked, published excerpts Monday.
NEWS
December 30, 1989 | Associated Press
The Sioux publisher of the weekly Lakota Times said Friday that he has returned the H. L. Mencken Writing Award he won in 1985 because of racist and sexist remarks Mencken made in his recently published diaries. "I feel very strongly that everything that I have fought for in the last 20 years to try and improve race relations . . . just wouldn't wash if I accepted an award and kept an award from a person that has attitudes that are so bigoted," said Tim Giago, a member of the Oglala Sioux tribe.
BOOKS
November 10, 2002 | Brad Leithauser, Brad Leithauser is the author of numerous books, including "Darlington's Fall: A Novel in Verse" and "The Odd Last Thing She Did: Poems."
It's a small but engaging literary form, deserving of its own modest library shelf: the biographies of curmudgeons. As a genre, it has its own peculiar challenges and evaluative criteria. Its very creation is likely to be haunted by a sense of self-generated menace, as the biographer inevitably begins to wonder how the emerging portrait might have stirred its subject's formidable wrath.
BOOKS
January 14, 1990 | RICHARD EDER
Curmudgeonry should be practiced outdoors and in public view. It needs wit but it also needs exhilaration; otherwise, it is sullenness, or witty sullenness at best. The exhilaration comes from the risk of saying outrageous things; the risk requires that everyone, including the target, should hear them. Without question, the late H. L. Mencken made his mark not only by his anger and his wit but also by the gaiety with which he turned them upon the idols of his time.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 27, 2004 | Anthony Day, Special to The Times
Mencken's America H. L. Mencken, edited by S. T. Joshi Ohio University Press: 244 pp; $49.95 cloth, $22.95 paper * This little book, if read, could revive H.L. Mencken's reputation. It has suffered a lot in recent years. The writer inappropriately nicknamed "the sage of Baltimore" -- avuncular he never was -- routinely made insulting remarks about Jews, African Americans, Italians and other immigrants. His tirades against Franklin D. Roosevelt and the New Deal have come to look petty and dated.
BOOKS
November 10, 2002 | Brad Leithauser, Brad Leithauser is the author of numerous books, including "Darlington's Fall: A Novel in Verse" and "The Odd Last Thing She Did: Poems."
It's a small but engaging literary form, deserving of its own modest library shelf: the biographies of curmudgeons. As a genre, it has its own peculiar challenges and evaluative criteria. Its very creation is likely to be haunted by a sense of self-generated menace, as the biographer inevitably begins to wonder how the emerging portrait might have stirred its subject's formidable wrath.
BOOKS
June 16, 2002 | BRAD LEITHAUSER, Brad Leithauser is the author of numerous books, including "Darlington's Fall: A Novel in Verse" and "The Odd Last Thing She Did: Poems."
When moved to scorn--and he was often scornful--H. L. Mencken was never at a loss for words. He lampooned "quacks" and "dolts" and "clodpolls," "snuffling publishers" and "jitney messiahs." He railed against the writers of "tosh" and "balderdash," "flubdub" and "buncombe" and "brummagem." He took aim at "skullduggery" and "numskullery" and "humbuggery." He tore into "piffle" and "blather." Even if you knew nothing of Mencken, coming to him by way of this fresh new collection, "H.L.
BOOKS
April 24, 1994 | Molly Ivins, The author of "Molly Ivins Can't Say That, Can She?" (Random House), Ivins is a columnist for the Fort Worth Star-Telegram
Even Henry Louis Mencken can't get away with being a curmudgeon anymore. In recent years his prejudices have been inspected for serious political "incorrectitude," his mental health pored over by prescribers of prophylactic doses of anti-depressants and his decline into mumpishness decried as though he hadn't been entitled to become an old crank. Ah, Mencken, where is thy sting now that we really need it?
NEWS
August 20, 1992 | TIM WARREN, THE BALTIMORE SUN
Terry Teachout knows that as a biographer of H.L. Mencken, he is supposed to know everything possible about his subject. But after getting ahold of Mencken's medical records recently and discovering what surgical procedures had been performed on him, he suspected he might have crossed the threshold. "I was in that stage in which everything about him was interesting," Teachout says with a laugh. "But that should be passing now."
NEWS
January 29, 1991
What ever happened to World War II "zip the lip"? Is the following merely coincidence? On Jan. 21, at the Pentagon press conference, some reporter had to ask if the Scud situation was clearing up. The answer was that, due to the weather and heavy cloud covering, positive determination was not available at the time. The very next day, old Saddam fired up some of the oil well areas in Kuwait. Is it too presumptuous to assume that Hussein got an idea from our explanation?
BOOKS
April 24, 1994 | Molly Ivins, The author of "Molly Ivins Can't Say That, Can She?" (Random House), Ivins is a columnist for the Fort Worth Star-Telegram
Even Henry Louis Mencken can't get away with being a curmudgeon anymore. In recent years his prejudices have been inspected for serious political "incorrectitude," his mental health pored over by prescribers of prophylactic doses of anti-depressants and his decline into mumpishness decried as though he hadn't been entitled to become an old crank. Ah, Mencken, where is thy sting now that we really need it?
NEWS
August 20, 1992 | TIM WARREN, THE BALTIMORE SUN
Terry Teachout knows that as a biographer of H.L. Mencken, he is supposed to know everything possible about his subject. But after getting ahold of Mencken's medical records recently and discovering what surgical procedures had been performed on him, he suspected he might have crossed the threshold. "I was in that stage in which everything about him was interesting," Teachout says with a laugh. "But that should be passing now."
BOOKS
February 25, 1990 | PETER HAY, Hay is the author of six books; the latest is "Broadway Anecdotes" (Oxford University Press). and
The recent publication of H. L. Mencken's diary caused the kind of furor that the curmudgeon of American letters would have loved. A good deal of this post-mortem controversy has to do with Henry Louis Mencken's status as the patron saint of journalists. It has been generally pointed out in the saint's defense that he was uncomplimentary not only about Jews and blacks, but practically everybody under the sun, including fellow journalists.
BOOKS
January 14, 1990 | RICHARD EDER
Curmudgeonry should be practiced outdoors and in public view. It needs wit but it also needs exhilaration; otherwise, it is sullenness, or witty sullenness at best. The exhilaration comes from the risk of saying outrageous things; the risk requires that everyone, including the target, should hear them. Without question, the late H. L. Mencken made his mark not only by his anger and his wit but also by the gaiety with which he turned them upon the idols of his time.
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