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H R Rick Kaufman

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BUSINESS
January 12, 1988 | JESUS SANCHEZ, Times Staff Writer
Pioneer Take-Out Corp., the fried chicken chain in the midst of an ownership battle, on Monday filed for protection under Chapter 11 of the U.S. Bankruptcy Code. The company said it expected its nearly 270 restaurants, which are mainly in Southern California, to remain open as it seeks to reorganize under court protection from creditors. "I am confident that we will emerge from this as a healthy, financially sound company," said H. R. (Rick) Kaufman, founder of the 26-year-old company.
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BUSINESS
July 15, 1988 | JESUS SANCHEZ, Times Staff Writer
Pioneer Take-Out Corp.--the Los Angeles-based fried chicken chain that filed for bankruptcy--has received a buyout offer from a group affiliated with a chain of recreation centers, it was announced Thursday. The offer is the latest attempt to salvage the ailing franchise operation, which lost sales to competing fried chicken chains and has been sued by disgruntled franchisees.
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BUSINESS
January 6, 1988 | JESUS SANCHEZ, Times Staff Writer
Less than a month after ownership of troubled Pioneer Take-Out Corp. changed hands, a controversy has erupted over control of the Southern California fried-chicken chain. Pioneer founder H. R. (Rick) Kaufman, who sold the 270-store fried-chicken chain to an investment group, is seeking to regain the company and has locked the new owners out of company headquarters, company officials said Tuesday. Kaufman said he moved to take control after the new owners failed to make a required payment.
BUSINESS
January 19, 1988 | JESUS SANCHEZ and NANCY YOSHIHARA, Times Staff Writers
A year ago, H. R. Kaufman, founder and owner of Pioneer Take-Out, turned to his friend and business associate Terrence P. Goggin for help with his troubled fried chicken chain. Faced with declining sales and discontented franchisees, Kaufman hired Goggin, an attorney and former California assemblyman from San Bernardino, to help find a buyer for the chain he started with one outlet in Echo Park 27 years ago.
BUSINESS
July 15, 1988 | JESUS SANCHEZ, Times Staff Writer
Pioneer Take-Out Corp.--the Los Angeles-based fried chicken chain that filed for bankruptcy--has received a buyout offer from a group affiliated with a chain of recreation centers, it was announced Thursday. The offer is the latest attempt to salvage the ailing franchise operation, which lost sales to competing fried chicken chains and has been sued by disgruntled franchisees.
BUSINESS
August 28, 1987 | NANCY YOSHIHARA, Times Staff Writer
When marshals appeared at some of Pioneer Take Out's company-owned fried-chicken restaurants not long ago, they did not stop for food. Instead, they emptied the cash registers. It was just one notable symbol of Pioneer's recent troubles, including declining sales, intense competition and major unhappiness among the ranks of its franchise holders. The marshals, acting under a court judgment, were collecting part of $160,000 that Pioneer owed to Cummings Inc., a sign company.
BUSINESS
January 19, 1988 | JESUS SANCHEZ and NANCY YOSHIHARA, Times Staff Writers
A year ago, H. R. Kaufman, founder and owner of Pioneer Take-Out, turned to his friend and business associate Terrence P. Goggin for help with his troubled fried chicken chain. Faced with declining sales and discontented franchisees, Kaufman hired Goggin, an attorney and former California assemblyman from San Bernardino, to help find a buyer for the chain he started with one outlet in Echo Park 27 years ago.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 27, 1990
Sherry Joan Kurland, a longtime Sherman Oaks resident who helped found the Open School in Los Angeles, has died in Encino. She was 49. Mrs. Kurland died Saturday of cancer, her husband Richard Kurland said. Born Sherry Joan Kaufman on July 23, 1941, in Los Angeles, she grew up in the Los Feliz area. She graduated from Marshall High School in 1959 and earned a bachelor of arts degree in public administration from UCLA in 1963.
BUSINESS
December 11, 1987 | JESUS SANCHEZ, Times Staff Writer
An investment group has taken control of troubled Pioneer Take-Out Corp. after agreeing to buy out the founder and owner of the fried-chicken restaurant chain for an undisclosed amount. Pioneer Acquisition Corp., headed by former California legislator Terrence B. Goggin and investment banker Robert B. MacDonald, took control on Wednesday, the company said. Goggin will serve as the company's chief executive and Mac Donald as chief financial officer. H. R.
BUSINESS
January 12, 1988 | JESUS SANCHEZ, Times Staff Writer
Pioneer Take-Out Corp., the fried chicken chain in the midst of an ownership battle, on Monday filed for protection under Chapter 11 of the U.S. Bankruptcy Code. The company said it expected its nearly 270 restaurants, which are mainly in Southern California, to remain open as it seeks to reorganize under court protection from creditors. "I am confident that we will emerge from this as a healthy, financially sound company," said H. R. (Rick) Kaufman, founder of the 26-year-old company.
BUSINESS
January 6, 1988 | JESUS SANCHEZ, Times Staff Writer
Less than a month after ownership of troubled Pioneer Take-Out Corp. changed hands, a controversy has erupted over control of the Southern California fried-chicken chain. Pioneer founder H. R. (Rick) Kaufman, who sold the 270-store fried-chicken chain to an investment group, is seeking to regain the company and has locked the new owners out of company headquarters, company officials said Tuesday. Kaufman said he moved to take control after the new owners failed to make a required payment.
BUSINESS
August 28, 1987 | NANCY YOSHIHARA, Times Staff Writer
When marshals appeared at some of Pioneer Take Out's company-owned fried-chicken restaurants not long ago, they did not stop for food. Instead, they emptied the cash registers. It was just one notable symbol of Pioneer's recent troubles, including declining sales, intense competition and major unhappiness among the ranks of its franchise holders. The marshals, acting under a court judgment, were collecting part of $160,000 that Pioneer owed to Cummings Inc., a sign company.
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