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NEWS
February 11, 1992 | DANIEL P. PUZO, TIMES STAFF WRITER
H. Russell Cross, an animal sciences professor at Texas A&M University, was appointed Monday as administrator of the U.S. Department of Agriculture's Food Safety and Inspection Service, the agency responsible for the safety of the nation's meat and poultry supply. The appointment by Secretary of Agriculture Edward R. Madigan was cheered by industry groups and harshly criticized by a coalition of Washington-based consumer groups.
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NEWS
February 11, 1992 | DANIEL P. PUZO, TIMES STAFF WRITER
H. Russell Cross, an animal sciences professor at Texas A&M University, was appointed Monday as administrator of the U.S. Department of Agriculture's Food Safety and Inspection Service, the agency responsible for the safety of the nation's meat and poultry supply. The appointment by Secretary of Agriculture Edward R. Madigan was cheered by industry groups and harshly criticized by a coalition of Washington-based consumer groups.
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NEWS
March 17, 1993 | Associated Press
The Agriculture Department said Tuesday it will develop a meat safety program to guard against bacterial contamination of meat "from the farm to the table." In testimony before two House Agriculture subcommittees, H. Russell Cross, administrator of the department's Food Safety and Inspection Service outlined elements of the long-range plan to improve meat safety. The proposals follow a deadly outbreak of meat-related food poisoning in Washington state.
FOOD
October 22, 1992 | DANIEL P. PUZO
Next month the USDA's Food Safety and Inspection Service is expected to approve a new way to reduce salmonella contamination in beef. According to preliminary results from a cooperative study by the meat industry and the federal government, three common acids found in food dramatically reduce salmonella levels on beef carcasses. When a water solution containing 1.
FOOD
April 15, 1993 | DANIEL P. PUZO, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The nation's largest association of public health officials is calling on the Clinton Administration to appoint a panel of scientists to review and reverse what it calls "the deterioration of our food safety." The Washington-based American Public Health Assn. recently petitioned President Clinton to completely examine the meat and poultry inspection process in light of the 500 illnesses and two deaths related to an outbreak of E. coli 0157:H7 on the Pacific Coast.
FOOD
March 25, 1993 | DANIEL P. PUZO, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Agriculture Department officials concede that the current meat inspection system is seriously flawed, scientifically outdated and may not be modernized for years. In testimony before a joint hearing of two House Agriculture subcommittees last week, officials outlined plans to prevent a recurrence of January's deadly outbreak linked to contaminated beef.
FOOD
October 22, 1992 | DANIEL P. PUZO, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In uncharacteristically swift action, the federal government has approved--in less than a month's time--two radical methods to combat rising levels of salmonella on chicken. As many as 60% of the carcasses in processing plants, it is estimated, harbor the potentially harmful bacteria. Just last week, the Agriculture Department's Food Safety and Inspection Service (FSIS) approved the use of trisodium phosphate in a rinse to destroy bacteria. Earlier, on Sept.
BUSINESS
April 22, 1988 | Associated Press
Cattle producers are already turning out much leaner beef than many people think, and those steaks, roasts and burgers probably will lose still more flab if consumer demand continues, says a new study by Texas A&M. Moreover, although researchers say it is hard to tell for sure, those juicy fast-food hamburgers probably are leaner than they sometimes look.
BUSINESS
September 19, 1992 | From Associated Press
Poultry processors got the green light Friday to begin zapping chickens, turkeys and game hens with gamma rays to kill bacteria. But the poultry industry isn't wild about the idea. Only one plant is expressing interest in irradiating chicken. And consumer activists worry about the safety. The Agriculture Department's new regulations could allow irradiated chicken and other poultry products to start showing up in markets by late October.
NEWS
February 6, 1993 | DANIEL P. PUZO, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Agriculture Secretary Mike Espy on Friday said his department must embark on an overhaul of the nation's meat inspection system, saying the current $500-million program is "no longer adequate." Testifying before a Senate Agriculture, Nutrition and Forestry subcommittee, Espy conceded that improvements in the program can reduce the likelihood of meat contamination but not prevent it. "No raw meat product is ever going to be 100% sterile," he said.
FOOD
June 18, 1992 | DANIEL P. PUZO, TIMES STAFF WRITER
An experimental federal program designed to modernize cattle slaughter plant inspection was sharply criticized by a consumer-advocacy group last week despite government claims that the pilot plan is working far better than anticipated. For the past eight years, the U.S. Department of Agriculture has been testing what it calls a "Streamlined Inspection System" as an alternative to traditional meat inspection.
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