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Ha Jin

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ENTERTAINMENT
November 22, 2009 | By Julia M. Klein
A Good Fall Stories Ha Jin Pantheon: 246 pp., $24.95 Figuring out what to keep, what to adopt and what to discard: These are the challenges for immigrant and exile alike. In his collection of lectures, "The Writer as Migrant" (2008), novelist Ha Jin considered the special case of a writer's displacement from his native land: Should he switch linguistic communities as well? If he does write in a foreign tongue, will he impoverish his craft or enrich it, be tarred with disloyalty or win new readers?
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ENTERTAINMENT
November 22, 2009 | By Julia M. Klein
A Good Fall Stories Ha Jin Pantheon: 246 pp., $24.95 Figuring out what to keep, what to adopt and what to discard: These are the challenges for immigrant and exile alike. In his collection of lectures, "The Writer as Migrant" (2008), novelist Ha Jin considered the special case of a writer's displacement from his native land: Should he switch linguistic communities as well? If he does write in a foreign tongue, will he impoverish his craft or enrich it, be tarred with disloyalty or win new readers?
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NEWS
March 24, 2005 | From Associated Press
Ha Jin's "War Trash," a novel about Chinese POWs under American captivity during the Korean War, has won the PEN/Faulkner prize for best fiction by an American author. He will receive $15,000. In announcing the award Wednesday, PEN/Faulkner co-chairs Robert Stone and Susan Richards Shreve praised the book as "a powerful, unflinching story that opens a window on an unknown aspect of a little-known war -- the experiences of Chinese POWs held by Americans during the Korean conflict."
ENTERTAINMENT
June 28, 2009 | George Ducker, Ducker is a writer in Los Angeles.
"The world which is being pictured by the story writers of today . . . is, by and large, and vividly, this day's, this troubled minute's, world." So Wilbur Daniel Steele wrote in the introduction to the 1943 edition of "The O. Henry Prize Stories." Created 90 years ago as a memorial to the twist-as-ending master whose real name was William Sydney Porter, the idea was to spotlight 20 or so works each year while singling out a top three.
BOOKS
October 24, 1999 | PETER GREEN, Peter Green is the former fiction critic of the London Daily Telegraph
"Every summer Lin Kong returned to Goose Village to divorce his wife, Shuyu." That first sentence promises well: We scent a witty social comedy ahead. Yet seldom have expectations been more systematically frustrated. "Waiting" is, after all, set in Communist China, and the marriage of Lin and Shuyu goes back as far as the iconoclastic activities of the Red Guards and the Gang of Four.
BOOKS
November 25, 2007 | Donna Seaman, Donna Seaman is an editor for Booklist and host of the radio program "Open Books" in Chicago (www.open booksradio.org). Her author interviews are collected in "Writers on the Air."
At home in China, every element of Nan and Pingping's existence was dictated by the government, including Nan's college courses. Sent to the United States to attend graduate school, he has been slogging his way toward a PhD in political science at Brandeis University. Nan and Pingping had to leave Taotao, their young son, behind, and now, four years later, the family is reunited.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 7, 2007 | Hillel Italie, Associated Press
Ha Jin is a winner of the National Book Award and a finalist for the Pulitzer Prize. His day job secure at Boston University, he and his wife live in a fine suburban house, close enough to Gillette Stadium to hear the fireworks on Sundays as the New England Patriots routinely beat up on an NFL opponent. He is an immigrant success story, arriving from China 20 years ago as a graduate student and staying on for good after the Tiananmen Square uprising of 1989 made him decide he couldn't return.
NEWS
June 6, 2000 | HENRY CHU, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The silence is almost deafening. Ever since author Ha Jin won America's National Book Award in November for his novel "Waiting," China has been curiously quiet over the remarkable literary success of one of its native sons, who moved to the U.S. from this provincial capital 15 years ago.
NEWS
October 3, 2000 | MICHAEL HARRIS, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Rarely has China seemed less exotic and more accessible than in these 12 stories by Ha Jin, author of last year's National Book Award-winning novel "Waiting." These are realistic stories, with beginnings, middles and ends. Ha's style is simple, even flat. The motivations of his characters are transparent and, for the most part, universal: to get better jobs, find love, have children and secure their futures.
BOOKS
October 10, 2004 | Linda Jaivin, Linda Jaivin is the author of "The Monkey and the Dragon," the novels "Eat Me" and "Miles Walker, You're Dead" and co-editor of "New Ghosts, Old Dreams: Chinese Rebel Voices."
In China in the early '80s, I met a shuffling, middle-aged factory worker who was in many ways unremarkable. He wore an old white shirt, baggy blue pants and cloth shoes and spoke Mandarin with a thick Shandong accent. Yet he was a Caucasian American, a former Korean War prisoner who had defected to his captors. Later, I met a Chinese survivor of the same war who was still brought to tears by his memories.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 7, 2007 | Hillel Italie, Associated Press
Ha Jin is a winner of the National Book Award and a finalist for the Pulitzer Prize. His day job secure at Boston University, he and his wife live in a fine suburban house, close enough to Gillette Stadium to hear the fireworks on Sundays as the New England Patriots routinely beat up on an NFL opponent. He is an immigrant success story, arriving from China 20 years ago as a graduate student and staying on for good after the Tiananmen Square uprising of 1989 made him decide he couldn't return.
BOOKS
November 25, 2007 | Donna Seaman, Donna Seaman is an editor for Booklist and host of the radio program "Open Books" in Chicago (www.open booksradio.org). Her author interviews are collected in "Writers on the Air."
At home in China, every element of Nan and Pingping's existence was dictated by the government, including Nan's college courses. Sent to the United States to attend graduate school, he has been slogging his way toward a PhD in political science at Brandeis University. Nan and Pingping had to leave Taotao, their young son, behind, and now, four years later, the family is reunited.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 23, 2006 | Mark Swed, Times Staff Writer
Tan Dun has done it. Well, not for all of "The First Emperor," not even for most of his important new opera, which had its premiere at the Metropolitan Opera on Thursday night. But for a little while, this frustrating yet momentarily glorious affair -- which brings to the Met stage everybody's favorite tenor, Placido Domingo, along with a lot of people's favorite Chinese film director, Zhang Yimou, and novelist and poet Ha Jin -- is one big, wild and wonderful wow.
NEWS
March 24, 2005 | From Associated Press
Ha Jin's "War Trash," a novel about Chinese POWs under American captivity during the Korean War, has won the PEN/Faulkner prize for best fiction by an American author. He will receive $15,000. In announcing the award Wednesday, PEN/Faulkner co-chairs Robert Stone and Susan Richards Shreve praised the book as "a powerful, unflinching story that opens a window on an unknown aspect of a little-known war -- the experiences of Chinese POWs held by Americans during the Korean conflict."
BOOKS
October 10, 2004 | Linda Jaivin, Linda Jaivin is the author of "The Monkey and the Dragon," the novels "Eat Me" and "Miles Walker, You're Dead" and co-editor of "New Ghosts, Old Dreams: Chinese Rebel Voices."
In China in the early '80s, I met a shuffling, middle-aged factory worker who was in many ways unremarkable. He wore an old white shirt, baggy blue pants and cloth shoes and spoke Mandarin with a thick Shandong accent. Yet he was a Caucasian American, a former Korean War prisoner who had defected to his captors. Later, I met a Chinese survivor of the same war who was still brought to tears by his memories.
NEWS
October 3, 2000 | MICHAEL HARRIS, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Rarely has China seemed less exotic and more accessible than in these 12 stories by Ha Jin, author of last year's National Book Award-winning novel "Waiting." These are realistic stories, with beginnings, middles and ends. Ha's style is simple, even flat. The motivations of his characters are transparent and, for the most part, universal: to get better jobs, find love, have children and secure their futures.
NEWS
November 18, 1999 | From Associated Press
Capping a ceremony hosted by Steve Martin and featuring Oprah Winfrey, National Book Award judges on Wednesday night honored a writer grateful just to be in the United States. Ha Jin, a former member of the Chinese People's Liberation Army, won the fiction prize for his novel "Waiting." "I want to thank America, the land of generosity and prosperity," said the author, who emigrated from China in 1985 and now teaches at Emory University.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 23, 2006 | Mark Swed, Times Staff Writer
Tan Dun has done it. Well, not for all of "The First Emperor," not even for most of his important new opera, which had its premiere at the Metropolitan Opera on Thursday night. But for a little while, this frustrating yet momentarily glorious affair -- which brings to the Met stage everybody's favorite tenor, Placido Domingo, along with a lot of people's favorite Chinese film director, Zhang Yimou, and novelist and poet Ha Jin -- is one big, wild and wonderful wow.
NEWS
June 6, 2000 | HENRY CHU, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The silence is almost deafening. Ever since author Ha Jin won America's National Book Award in November for his novel "Waiting," China has been curiously quiet over the remarkable literary success of one of its native sons, who moved to the U.S. from this provincial capital 15 years ago.
NEWS
November 18, 1999 | From Associated Press
Capping a ceremony hosted by Steve Martin and featuring Oprah Winfrey, National Book Award judges on Wednesday night honored a writer grateful just to be in the United States. Ha Jin, a former member of the Chinese People's Liberation Army, won the fiction prize for his novel "Waiting." "I want to thank America, the land of generosity and prosperity," said the author, who emigrated from China in 1985 and now teaches at Emory University.
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