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Habitat Protection

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 24, 2000
Re "U.S. Declares 500,000 Acres Critical Habitat for 2 Species," Oct. 18: I cannot truly express the full extent of my wholehearted support of this declaration by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service. This decision means life, rather than certain death, not only for the California gnatcatcher bird and the San Diego fairy shrimp but also for many other endangered and threatened animals and plants that also call those areas home. And in answer to Laer Pearce, a developer's representative and the executive director of the Coalition for Habitat Conservation, I must say that it is greed, not need, that drives the rampant overdevelopment of Southern California and that preserving a mere half-million acres is a very low price to pay to conserve these species for future generations and to continue the quality of life we enjoy in Southern California.
ARTICLES BY DATE
SCIENCE
October 10, 2009 | Times Staff and Wire Reports
Four years after the dwindling sea otters of southwest Alaska were placed on the Endangered Species List, the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service designated nearly 5,900 square miles as critical habitat for otters in the Aleutian Islands, Bering Sea and Alaska Peninsula. Near-shore areas were chosen because most of the creatures that sea otters eat -- sea urchins, crabs, octopuses and some bottom fish -- are found in shallow waters, which also provide the best protection from marine predators.
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OPINION
August 11, 2003
I applaud the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Services' move to establish protection for 53,000 acres of critical habitat at the Algodones Dunes, located in Imperial County (Aug. 7). The Algodones Dunes are a national treasure teeming with rare and unique forms of life found nowhere else on Earth. The incredible beauty of these dunes is primarily known to off-road enthusiasts and a growing number of hikers and backpackers, like myself, who make overnight trips into California's largest sand dunes.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 1, 2005 | From Times Wire Reports
State and federal officials approved a plan to preserve 9,243 acres of wildlife habitat in San Diego County in exchange for a streamlined development approval process in the city of Chula Vista. The preserve will include 4,993 acres within Chula Vista -- 16.5% of the city's area -- and an additional 4,250 acres east of the city in unincorporated San Diego County. State and federal permits authorizing the preserve were issued Jan. 13.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 7, 1994 | DAVID FOSTER, ASSOCIATED PRESS
Environmental activists relish the irony: The disaster that fouled Alaska's coast with oil in 1989 is now saving parts of it from logging. To compensate the government for oil damages to natural resources, Exxon Corp. agreed in 1991 to pay $900 million into a restoration fund. Since then, the fund's state and federal trustees have made habitat protection a priority. Last year, they bought 42,000 acres of private land near Kodiak Island to create the new Afognak Island State Park.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 9, 1995
The article "Conservancy Should Sell Streisand Land" (Valley Commentary, March 12) by William Wells of the Coalition to Preserve Las Virgenes was well taken, especially by those who are weary of the Santa Monica Mountains Conservancy's failure to focus on habitat protection. After all, the conservancy could be preserving parking lots if mere open space were the point. Instead, here they are, desperately clinging to the "Streisand Center," which we taxpayers don't need and don't want.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 13, 1986
Your article (Jan. 5), "Breeding Condor Critically Ill From Poisoning by Lead," provided additional evidence that California condors are not receiving the protection they require in their natural habitat from shooting and poisons. The tragedy of yet one more bird suffering from lead poisoning, apparently from "eight pieces of lead in various parts of its body . . . seven of them (being) shotgun pellets," could have been avoided. Habitat protection is what public agencies that purport to protect wildlife are most reluctant to provide.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 16, 1990
On behalf of the more than 1.2 million members of the Humane Society of the U.S., I would like to express my amazement over Mary Williams Walsh's article, "Canada's Fur Trade Feels Chill" (Column One, Nov. 6). To claim that the fur industry is the savior of Canada's Indians is fallacious. Native people respect the Earth and its animal inhabitants. By making the killing of animals a commercial venture, as the fur industry has done, the sanctity of life is reduced to a monetary value, a complete reversal of the traditional beliefs of Indians.
NEWS
March 16, 1999 | KIM MURPHY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Endangered species regulation will move from the rural back-country to the heart of one of the nation's fastest-growing metropolitan areas today with the federal government's expected decision to extend protected status to salmon in urban waters around the cities of Seattle and Portland, Ore.
OPINION
August 11, 2003
I applaud the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Services' move to establish protection for 53,000 acres of critical habitat at the Algodones Dunes, located in Imperial County (Aug. 7). The Algodones Dunes are a national treasure teeming with rare and unique forms of life found nowhere else on Earth. The incredible beauty of these dunes is primarily known to off-road enthusiasts and a growing number of hikers and backpackers, like myself, who make overnight trips into California's largest sand dunes.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 13, 2002 | Janet Wilson, Times Staff Writer
A federal judge in Washington, D.C., has eliminated protection of nearly 4 million acres of habitat in 28 California counties for the imperiled red-legged frog, the athletic amphibian immortalized in Mark Twain's story "The Celebrated Jumping Frog of Calaveras County." The frog, the largest in the Western United States, has been on the endangered species list since 1996, its plummeting population attributed to the steady loss of wetlands throughout much of the state. U.S.
NEWS
February 16, 2002 | SEEMA MEHTA and DEBORAH SCHOCH, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Officials of the Bush administration have asked a federal judge to invalidate protection of several hundred thousand acres of land deemed essential for the survival of two Southern California endangered species. In addition, the officials at the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service say they are considering whether to reevaluate up to 10 such "critical habitat" designations involving millions of acres of land, primarily in California.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 24, 2000
Re "U.S. Declares 500,000 Acres Critical Habitat for 2 Species," Oct. 18: I cannot truly express the full extent of my wholehearted support of this declaration by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service. This decision means life, rather than certain death, not only for the California gnatcatcher bird and the San Diego fairy shrimp but also for many other endangered and threatened animals and plants that also call those areas home. And in answer to Laer Pearce, a developer's representative and the executive director of the Coalition for Habitat Conservation, I must say that it is greed, not need, that drives the rampant overdevelopment of Southern California and that preserving a mere half-million acres is a very low price to pay to conserve these species for future generations and to continue the quality of life we enjoy in Southern California.
NEWS
March 16, 1999 | KIM MURPHY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Endangered species regulation will move from the rural back-country to the heart of one of the nation's fastest-growing metropolitan areas today with the federal government's expected decision to extend protected status to salmon in urban waters around the cities of Seattle and Portland, Ore.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 21, 1997
Re: Frank Schillo's Ahmanson trial balloon: I used to think Vince Curtis did not have a snowball's chance in Phoenix to get elected to Schillo's seat on the Board of Supervisors. But after reading Schillo's logic I'm starting to think he has a good chance. While City Councilman Steve Bennett of Ventura and Councilwoman Linda Parks of Thousand Oaks are working hard on SOAR, an initiative to put huge land zoning in the hands of the public, Schillo is weaseling out on inadequate mitigation and displaying his ignorance.
NEWS
November 18, 1994 | DOUG CONNER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
President Clinton's timber plan, designed to resolve the long-running dispute over the need for forest habitat versus the need for forest products, Thursday came before a federal judge, who will decide whether the proposal is acceptable under environmental law. If approved, the plan could settle one of the most divisive environmental battles of recent years--the fight over logging in the old growth forests of the Pacific Northwest, home of the threatened northern spotted owl.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 1, 2005 | From Times Wire Reports
State and federal officials approved a plan to preserve 9,243 acres of wildlife habitat in San Diego County in exchange for a streamlined development approval process in the city of Chula Vista. The preserve will include 4,993 acres within Chula Vista -- 16.5% of the city's area -- and an additional 4,250 acres east of the city in unincorporated San Diego County. State and federal permits authorizing the preserve were issued Jan. 13.
NEWS
May 25, 1997 | TOM WELLS, ASSOCIATED PRESS
At the tip of the Florida Keys, which drop down from the mainland like a strand of dark green emeralds on an aqua sea, lies the Great White Heron National Wildlife Refuge. About the only noise in this exotic home to several endangered species are the animal sounds, the bird- calls and flapping of wings, and gentle waves breaking against the mangroves.
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