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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 26, 1996 | RICHARD SIMON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Subway opponents filed a suit Monday seeking to block tunneling through the Hollywood Hills, contending that the Metropolitan Transportation Authority has failed to comply with state and federal environmental laws.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 31, 2013 | By Louis Sahagun
A state regulatory agency on Thursday gave the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers 60 days to submit a plan for restoring 49 acres of wildlife habitat that it plowed under at two locations along the Los Angeles River without proper authorization. The Los Angeles Regional Water Quality Control Board ordered the corps to mitigate the unauthorized dredge and fill operations at the Verdugo Wash in Glendale and Sepulveda Basin in the San Fernando Valley in a manner that will support the water quality, vegetation and wildlife that existed before they were graded.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 31, 2013 | By Louis Sahagun
A state regulatory agency on Thursday gave the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers 60 days to submit a plan for restoring 49 acres of wildlife habitat that it plowed under at two locations along the Los Angeles River without proper authorization. The Los Angeles Regional Water Quality Control Board ordered the corps to mitigate the unauthorized dredge and fill operations at the Verdugo Wash in Glendale and Sepulveda Basin in the San Fernando Valley in a manner that will support the water quality, vegetation and wildlife that existed before they were graded.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 26, 1996 | RICHARD SIMON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Subway opponents filed a suit Monday seeking to block tunneling through the Hollywood Hills, contending that the Metropolitan Transportation Authority has failed to comply with state and federal environmental laws.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 13, 2000
Speaking as the head of Southern California's only regional conservation organization, The Times' editorial "Preserve Barham Ranch" (Jan. 2) was right on target. At the confluence of three regional parks, and containing outstanding wetlands and coastal sage, Barham Ranch is an essential component of Orange County's open-space system. The public agencies that own Barham Ranch should accept the fair-market-value-system purchase price offered by the county. Unless all branches of government pull together, this opportunity will be lost, and the citizens and wildlife of Orange County will forever be the poorer.
NEWS
June 20, 2013 | By Mary Forgione, Los Angeles Times Daily Deal and Travel Blogger
Park rangers at five L.A.-area parks invite you to come roast a few marshmallows around the campfire and learn about the more natural side of the urban core you live in. Ranger events create an outdoors-in-the-city experience good for children and families -- and they're free. The deal: The evening campfires are sponsored by the Santa Monica Mountains Conservancy, which works to help create open space, trails and habitats in Los Angeles and beyond. The campfires feature ranger talks, sing-alongs and of course marshmallow roasting (if you want s'mores, bring your own graham crackers and chocolate)
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 9, 1994 | REBECCA BRYANT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The signs lead you through the Hollywood Hills, where Jon Earl and Ellen Petty are perfecting the blueprints for their vision. The signs, some whimsical, some challenging, greet commuters as they travel the winding roads to the city. DRAGONFLY CROSSING, CAR MIGRATION, COYOTES CELEBRATING 40,000 YRS. ON THE MOUNTAIN, YOU ARE WATCHING THE NATURE CHANNEL are some of the messages Earl and Petty plant on the roadsides, hoping to sow understanding.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 11, 2000
In "Debate Builds Over Proposed Mexican Resort" (Jan. 5), a controversial proposal for massive development in San Quintin Bay, in Baja California, is described. San Quintin Bay is a one-of-a-kind treasure, a truly intact bay and salt marsh ecosystem. This oversized development--hotels, second homes, shopping centers, marina, golf courses, underground parking--would be incompatible with sustainable use of the bay's fragile and pristine resources, such as aquaculture. Such a transformation would also preclude the local community from fashioning its own land use plan for the area.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 20, 1998
The article on the endangered Delhi Sands Flower-Loving Fly ("Buzz Over a Fly Presents Challenge to Species Act," June 15) well illustrates the tactics of one camp in endangered species disputes. Those litigating against the Endangered Species Act oppose problem-solving and are against cooperative efforts like California's Natural Community Conservation Planning program. In Orange and San Diego counties, this program has been successful in combining endangered species protections with development permitting and with creation of parkland.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 26, 1998
Again, Rep. Ron Packard (R-Vista) is using the power of his office to completely ignore the environmental impacts of the Foothill South toll road ("Bill Could Speed Foothill Tollway Project," July 17). How does he do it? By the use of a rider to a transportation appropriations bill. The move would remove the Corps of Engineers and the Environmental Protection Agency from fulfilling their statutory responsibilities. According to the League of Conservation Voters, an independent group that tracks the environmental records of our congressmen and senators, Packard has one of the worst environmental records in the Congress.
OPINION
October 20, 2002
Re "Crowded Future Challenges Imaginations of Planners," Oct. 11: Evan Halper's article on USC's Reality Check on Growth conference provided a good overview of the challenges facing Southern California's continued growth. At the conference, I stressed that we must balance the need for new housing with the need to protect our remaining ecologically sensitive lands, our clean air and water, and our quality of life now and for our children. I am working to achieve a solution for the remaining 23,000 acres of Rancho Mission Viejo in south Orange County.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 4, 1999
Kenneth Khachigian would have us believe he wants more money spent on battered women and less on endangered species (June 20 column). Any time a right-winger starts supporting women's issues, check your wallet. The truth is that the right wing has opposed every effort to deal with domestic violence. Khachigian writes, "The total amount available in California for public service announcements discouraging domestic violence is less than half a million dollars." What Khachigian did not say is the reason the amount is so low is because right-wing governors cut the budget, not because environmental laws have eaten up all the surplus.
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