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Habits

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HEALTH
April 6, 2009 | Karen Ravn
Maybe you chew your fingernails when you're nervous. Or scarf down chocolate when you're sad. Or take home a stray kitty whenever you see one, until the SPCA has to come rescue them all and have you arrested for being a hoarder. Chances are, you have a few habits you wish you didn't have, and quite possibly you've tried (and tried and tried) to break them. Scientists are learning why you may have failed (and failed and failed).
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SCIENCE
April 17, 2014 | By Amina Khan
Sifting through observations from more than 100,000 distant stars, astronomers say they have discovered the first definitive Earth-sized planet that orbits in a habitable zone where water could exist in liquid form - a necessary condition for life as we know it. Scientists don't know whether the planet has water or a protective atmosphere. They don't even know its mass. But they said the landmark discovery gives astronomers great hope that a bumper crop of Earth-like planets is waiting to be found much closer to home, including around temperamental stars that until recently were considered inhospitable to life.
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OPINION
August 9, 2013 | By Wendy Wood and David Neal
On a recent doctor's visit, a compelling health video was looping in the reception room. It incorporated many of the accepted rules for achieving a healthy weight. The motivational video, tailored to the doctor's clientele, illustrated simple ways to eat more fruits and vegetables and get exercise. It was striking, however, that many of the nursing staff, who must have heard this video a thousand times, didn't seem to have taken it to heart. Nurses, as a national study revealed, are just as likely to overeat as the rest of the population.
SCIENCE
April 10, 2014 | By Karen Kaplan
In their continuing quest to prove that coffee is indeed a health food, medical researchers analyzed the health records of nearly 180,000 Americans and determined that the ones with a daily java habit were less likely to get a common type of liver cancer than their less-caffeinated counterparts. The study , presented this week at the American Assn. for Cancer Research's annual meeting in San Diego, may not be enough to get your coffee break covered by your health insurance, but the results were striking.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 17, 2013
Join Times transportation writer Laura J. Nelson for an L.A. Now Live discussion at 9 a.m. about Metro's Expo Line and a new study released this week. Nelson  reported  that after the light-rail line opened, Angelenos who lived within a half-mile of the station tripled their rail ridership and reduced their daily driving by 40%, according to the study. Furthermore, households within a half-mile of an Expo Line station reduced their driving by 10 to 12 miles a day, compared with those who lived farther away.  The 8.6-mile Expo Line opened April 28, 2012 to much fanfare as one of the first rail connections in decades to penetrate the traffic-clogged Westside.
HEALTH
January 2, 2012 | By Jeannine Stein, Los Angeles Times
What does it really take to change a habit? It may have less to do with willpower and more to do with consistency and a person's environment, researchers have found. A 2009 study in the European Journal of Social Psychology had 96 people adopt a new healthful habit over 12 weeks - things like running for 15 minutes at the same time each day or eating a piece of fruit with lunch. The average number of days it took for participants to pick up the habit was 66, but the range was huge, from 18 to 254 days.
NEWS
August 22, 1999
I feel vindicated! Regarding "Children Learn to Say, 'Buy, Buy,' " (Aug. 9), I have been saying this for years. I have two sons of my own, and I teach third grade in a Los Angeles Unified School District school. For years most people have thought I was overreacting to this issue. Have you checked out the Center for Media Literacy, located in L.A., and the organization TV-Free America, based in Washington, D.C.? Both are worthy and interesting groups. I hope that with the recent attention this issue has been receiving, more people, especially parents and teachers, will realize just how important it is and begin to change their current viewing habits.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 4, 1999 | KRISTINA SAUERWEIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
It's not always easy getting children to read, especially during the long summer months. Experts say that sometimes the best thing a parent can do is nothing--but make sure books are easily available. Let children get tired of the same old television reruns, of doing nothing with the same old friends. Let them be bored, and they could become avid readers, according to librarians, principals, teachers, children and those who study literacy.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 9, 1993 | PSYCHE PASCUAL, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Dr. Stephen Brunton is used to having his instructions followed--by his patients and also by the family medicine residents he oversees at Long Beach Memorial Hospital. So when Brunton prescribed a month of clean living to nine first-year residents, he was understandably taken aback by the results: All but one cheated. Like sinners at a confessional, the doctors admitted to bingeing on soft drinks, scarfing desserts and furtively playing computer games that they had promised to give up.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 17, 2012 | By Elaine Woo, Los Angeles Times
Stephen R. Covey, a former Brigham Young University business professor who blended personal self-help and management theory in a massive bestseller, "The 7 Habits of Highly Effective People," died Monday at a hospital in Idaho Falls, Idaho. He was 79. The cause was complications from injuries sustained in a bicycle accident, said Debra Lund, a spokeswoman for the Utah-based FranklinCovey leadership training and consulting company he co-founded. In April, Covey lost control of his bike while riding down a hill in Provo, Utah.
SCIENCE
March 17, 2014 | By Melissa Healy
At the tender age of 2 months old, many American babies appear to be taking their first steps on the road to obesity, helped along by parents who may be preoccupied, pushy or uninformed about the care and feeding of babies for optimal health, a new study says. The latest research found that in a population of predominantly low-income mothers and infants, 2-month-old babies routinely spent long hours either in front of a television or being fed or cared for by a parent watching TV, were frequently put to bed or left to feed themselves with a propped bottle, and rarely got the recommended amount of daily "tummy time" that challenges a baby's physical development.
NATIONAL
March 8, 2014 | By Justin George
They're known as Arabbers and their profession as Arabbing - words that are supposed to evoke the nomadic life of a street merchant. Arabbers sell fruit and vegetables from horse-drawn carts, much as the first Arabbers did when the profession took root in Baltimore after the Civil War as a way to provide blacks with work. Once a thriving niche with more than 40 stables across the city, the trade has declined to just three stables. The job of guiding a horse and a day's worth of inventory through city streets has always been hazardous.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 5, 2014 | By Meg James and Joe Flint
Walt Disney Co. and satellite TV provider Dish Network's sweeping new agreement could lead to changes in the way consumers watch television. The comprehensive distribution deal, announced late Monday, is expected to become a blueprint on how the television industry treats the increasingly important digital rights for valuable programming. Dish secured Internet streaming rights for content from Disney's ESPN, ESPN2, ABC Family and Disney Channel as well as the eight ABC television stations that Disney owns.
OPINION
February 19, 2014 | Patt Morrison
If there are stars among the state's water experts, Jay Famiglietti is one, with titles too long for a marquee: a UC Irvine professor of earth system science and head of the UC Center for Hydrologic Modeling, and a new member of the Santa Ana Regional Water Quality Control Board among them. He'd like to rescue us from our bad H2O habits before the last reel, which is why he's laying out our thirsty realities in places like the 2011 documentary, "Last Call at the Oasis," and right here.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 19, 2014 | By Dianne de Guzman
The saying "old habits die hard" usually refers to unsavory behavior, but in this case, it's not: Actress Jane Fonda continues to be an activist for many causes, including taking part in the recent "One Billion Rising for Justice" rally in West Hollywood. Those familiar with Fonda may recall that the actress has a long-running history of causes. A mugshot of hers from the 1970s shows the actress posing with a raised fist; her arrest was seemingly connected with her outspokenness against the Vietnam War. The " One Billion Rising for Justice " event was a call to demand justice for violence against women, and photographer Skylar Aud was there to capture the moment.
SCIENCE
January 17, 2014 | By Monte Morin, This post has been updated. See the note below for details.
The U.S. surgeon general is calling on Hollywood to kick the tobacco habit, saying too many youth-rated films contain harmful images of tobacco use. In a new report on smoking released Friday, acting Surgeon General Boris Lushniak and other U.S. health officials greatly expanded the list of tobacco's damaging health effects and urged renewed focus on reducing national smoking rates.  Among dozens of findings and recommendations, the report found...
BUSINESS
March 19, 2013 | By Joe Flint, Los Angeles Times
Leslie Moonves has had the same morning routine for decades. "The first thing I do after getting out of the shower is pick up Daily Variety and have a cup of coffee," the CBS Corp. chief executive said. "It's a 30-year habit. " That habit is ending for Moonves and lots of other Hollywood power players, movie and television stars, producers and publicists and thousands of wannabes: Daily Variety is ceasing as a print publication after almost 80 years. Tuesday's edition is its last.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 10, 2000
With the current gas prices as they are, has anyone noticed a change in driving habits? I haven't. HARRY LESSEOS Palm Desert
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 17, 2013
Join Times transportation writer Laura J. Nelson for an L.A. Now Live discussion at 9 a.m. about Metro's Expo Line and a new study released this week. Nelson  reported  that after the light-rail line opened, Angelenos who lived within a half-mile of the station tripled their rail ridership and reduced their daily driving by 40%, according to the study. Furthermore, households within a half-mile of an Expo Line station reduced their driving by 10 to 12 miles a day, compared with those who lived farther away.  The 8.6-mile Expo Line opened April 28, 2012 to much fanfare as one of the first rail connections in decades to penetrate the traffic-clogged Westside.
SCIENCE
December 13, 2013 | By Amina Khan
The habitable zone around sun-like stars might be a little wider - or thinner - depending on how big you thought the habitable zone was in the first place, suggests new research in the journal Nature. The findings, based on 3-D models of the runaway greenhouse gas effect, may alter the estimated number of habitable planets around sun-like stars in our galaxy - and they may also may affect how future planet-hunting space telescopes are designed and built. The habitable zone is the doughnut-shaped "Goldilocks" region around a star where a planet would be warm enough to have liquid water and cool enough to keep it from evaporating away.
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