Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsHacking Scandal
IN THE NEWS

Hacking Scandal

FEATURED ARTICLES
BUSINESS
September 14, 2011 | By Meg James and Janet Stobart, Los Angeles Times
James Murdoch is being called back before a committee of the British Parliament to further explain his involvement in the cellphone hacking scandal that continues to shake the family-controlled News Corp. media empire. Parliament's Culture, Media and Sport Committee said Tuesday that it would like to re-question the 38-year-old scion to sort out conflicting evidence provided to the panel in its investigation of the ethics scandal at News Corp.'s now-shuttered News of the World tabloid.
ARTICLES BY DATE
WORLD
October 30, 2013 | By Janet Stobart
LONDON - A plan to regulate the British press as a result of the country's phone-hacking scandal was signed by Queen Elizabeth II on Wednesday despite the objections of publishers who sought a court order to block such a measure. The royal charter approved by the queen and the nation's major political parties calls for the creation of a watchdog group designed to curb the type of abuses revealed by the scandal. The practices include listening to the voicemails of crime victims, celebrities, royal family members and others, such as employees or relatives of people in the news.
Advertisement
BUSINESS
October 12, 2011 | By Dawn C. Chmielewski, Los Angeles Times
Les Hinton, a former top publishing executive at News Corp. and longtime friend of its chief executive, Rupert Murdoch, has been called by a committee of British Parliament to answer a fresh round of questions this month about the phone hacking scandal roiling the media conglomerate. Hinton served for a dozen years as executive chairman of News Corp.'s British newspaper unit, News International, when the hacking allegedly occurred. He left in late 2007 to become chief executive of Dow Jones, publisher of the Wall Street Journal.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 17, 2013 | By Geneva Overholser
A year ago, word went out that Rupert Murdoch was looking to buy this newspaper. Reaction was swift, strong and all over the map. Some envisioned the father of Fox News turning The Times into another partisan mouthpiece. Others fretted over Murdoch's enmeshment in the United Kingdom's huge phone-hacking and police-corruption scandal. A few countered: Here is a man who loves newspapers and invests in them, lavishly. In short, the response was as complicated as the man. This is the challenge facing David Folkenflik in "Murdoch's World: The Last of the Old Media Empires.
WORLD
July 17, 2011 | By Henry Chu, Los Angeles Times
Rebekah Brooks, the former head of media mogul Rupert Murdoch's British operations, was arrested Sunday in connection with a spiraling phone-hacking scandal, police and media reports said. Scotland Yard confirmed that a 43-year-old woman was arrested at noon on suspicion of conspiring to intercept private voicemails and corruption allegations. British media identified the woman as Brooks. Until her resignation Friday, Brooks was the chief executive of News International, the British subsidiary of Murdoch's media giant News Corp.
WORLD
July 8, 2011 | By Henry Chu and Joe Flint, Los Angeles Times
Facing a tide of outrage over rampant phone-hacking, Rupert Murdoch jettisoned the notorious News of the World tabloid in an effort to protect his media empire, but the dramatic step may prove insufficient to contain the growing scandal or secure his bid to expand an already massive presence in Britain. Murdoch is struggling to ensure that toxic fallout does not infect other parts of News Corp., a media giant with holdings from Asia to the U.S., including the Wall Street Journal and Fox News.
BUSINESS
November 3, 2011 | By Dawn C. Chmielewski, Los Angeles Times
The British phone hacking scandal continues to take its toll on News Corp. The media conglomerate on Wednesday reported a 5% drop in its fiscal first-quarter earnings. It incurred charges associated with shutting down its News of the World tabloid in London, which has been at the center of the scandal, and abandoning its bid to acquire 100% of satellite broadcaster British Sky Broadcasting. News Corp.'s financial disclosures come as a Vanity Fair magazine article — on newsstands Friday but released to media Wednesday — reveals how the hacking crisis has intensified a rift among members of the Murdoch family, which owns 12% of the company's shares but controls nearly 40% of their voting power.
OPINION
July 13, 2011
Good bad news Re "Phone hacking scandal widens," July 12 I could not be more pleased at the damage inflicted on Rupert Murdoch's global misinformation machine. I regret the harm done to the victims of Murdoch's stooges, but I'm pleased the perpetrators have been caught and will probably pay a heavy price. I hope the left in Britain and the United States will take advantage of Murdoch's weakened state as an opportunity to inflict even more damage on him. As an expat American, I especially hope the left in my country will exploit every opportunity to use these and any further charges that may emerge against Murdoch's stooges at Fox News.
WORLD
July 12, 2011 | By Henry Chu, Los Angeles Times
Embattled media magnate Rupert Murdoch's bid for control of Britain's biggest satellite broadcaster ran into further trouble Monday, even as new reports surfaced that a former prime minister and senior members of the royal family were possible targets of a phone-hacking campaign by journalists. Murdoch's long-running attempt to add satellite TV company BSkyB to his News Corp. media conglomerate faces several months of delay after the British government decided to refer the $12-billion bid to regulators charged with determining whether allowing ownership by Murdoch would violate anti-monopoly rules.
WORLD
July 14, 2011 | By Henry Chu, Los Angeles Times
After initially saying no, media mogul Rupert Murdoch and his son James agreed Thursday to appear before lawmakers next week to answer questions about the hacking scandal that has engulfed their company's newspapers in Britain. The about-face came after top political leaders piled pressure on father and son to give evidence before a parliamentary committee, with Deputy Prime Minister Nick Clegg urging the two men to "do the decent thing; you can't hide away from this level of public anguish and anger.
OPINION
March 24, 2013 | By the Los Angeles Times editorial board
Britain's three major political parties have agreed on a new system of regulating newspapers in the aftermath of shocking invasions of privacy by some tabloid journalists. In this case, unanimity doesn't equal wisdom. The London-based Index on Censorship was right to call the new system a "sad day for press freedom in the U.K. " The new arrangement will implement recommendations of a prominent British judge who conducted an inquiry into press conduct after a "phone-hacking" scandal in which journalists illegally accessed information from the telephones of celebrities, politicians and a kidnapped girl who was later found dead.
WORLD
February 1, 2013 | By Janet Stobart
LONDON - A senior police officer was given a 15-month term in prison Friday, the first person sentenced in the wide-ranging phone-hacking inquiry in Britain.   Det. Chief Inspector April Casburn was convicted last month of illegally attempting to sell information to a tabloid journalist in 2010. Judge Adrian Fulford was handed down by who called her actions "a corrupt attempt to make money out of sensitive and potentially very damaging information," according to a BBC report. Scotland Yard, where Casburn had headed the counter-terrorism squad at the time of her offense, issued a statement expressing its “great disappointment” that she “abused her position.” During her trial, Casburn spoke of her unhappiness at work and anger that counter-terrorist officers were diverted to investigate accusations that the now-defunct News of the World tabloid had made extensive use of phone hacking to gain news scoops.
WORLD
November 29, 2012 | By Henry Chu
LONDON - In a highly anticipated and lengthy report, a senior judge Thursday recommended that a new, independent regulatory authority be set up to monitor Britain's raucous press and to crack down on media abuses such as phone hacking and other unethical newsgathering practices. Justice Brian Leveson said such a regulator was necessary because the press had at times “wreaked havoc in the lives of innocent people” through its intrusions on privacy and relentless pursuit of scoops.
WORLD
November 29, 2012 | By Henry Chu, Los Angeles Times
LONDON - Britain should set up an independent regulator to monitor its freewheeling news media and prevent abuses such as the phone-hacking scandal that exposed unethical and sometimes illegal news-gathering practices, a senior judge said Thursday after a yearlong investigation. The new regulating body should be established by law and exclude politicians and editors to guarantee its independence from government and industry pressure, Lord Justice Brian Leveson said in a much-anticipated report that blasted the aggressive tactics often associated with British tabloids and paparazzi.
WORLD
November 20, 2012 | By Henry Chu
LONDON -- A former senior aide to Prime Minister David Cameron and the onetime chief of Rupert Murdoch's British newspapers will be charged with bribery offenses in the latest legal action stemming from Britain's phone-hacking scandal, prosecutors said Tuesday. Authorities announced that Andy Coulson, who was Cameron's top communications deputy, and Rebekah Brooks, who served as head of Murdoch's News International, would be charged in connection with separate incidents in which journalists paid public officials for sensitive information.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 20, 2012 | By Meg James and Joe Flint
After the coffee. Before trying to figure out how to return those Twinkies we ordered on Ebay. The Skinny:  Two prominent former News International executives are expected to be charged in the long-running phone hacking probe in London. John Malone says sports fees are out of control. Joe Flint is back at the controls Wednesday. I'm just your temporary Morning Fix hostess. Daily Dose: A federal judge is trying to mediate the standoff between Hostess and its bakers union.
WORLD
July 19, 2011 | By Henry Chu, Los Angeles Times
After barely a year as Britain's prime minister, David Cameron is facing the gravest crisis of his political career, forced onto the defensive by a spiraling phone-hacking scandal that has sown turmoil in the press, Scotland Yard and the hallowed halls of No. 10 Downing Street. Cameron came under increasingly heavy fire Monday for appointing a former tabloid editor, Andy Coulson, as his communications director, bringing into his inner circle a man now suspected of conspiring to hack into people's cellphones and of bribing police officers for information.
WORLD
August 16, 2011 | By Henry Chu, Los Angeles Times
Rupert Murdoch's media empire suffered a potentially heavy blow in the British phone-hacking scandal Tuesday when Parliament released documents suggesting that reporters and top editors at the News of the World practiced and sanctioned the illegal interception of voicemails. An internal letter written in 2007 by Clive Goodman, a former reporter at the tabloid and the only one convicted so far in the scandal, alleged that phone hacking had the "full knowledge and support" of others at the paper and was "widely discussed" at daily editorial meetings.
BUSINESS
September 21, 2012 | By Henry Chu, Los Angeles Times
LONDON — British Sky Broadcasting, the satellite TV network partially owned by Rupert Murdoch, remains a "fit and proper" holder of a broadcast license despite the phone-hacking scandal that has engulfed Murdoch's media empire, according to Britain's communications watchdog. But the regulatory agency harshly criticized Murdoch's son, James, the former head of BSkyB, for his lackadaisical response to the hacking debacle. The agency said Thursday that James Murdoch "repeatedly fell short of the conduct to be expected of him as a chief executive officer and chairman" of News International, the British arm of his father's media giant News Corp.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|