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NEWS
September 22, 1995
Thanks for Michael Colton's interesting story about Hacky Sack, "The Goodwill Game" (Sept. 18). I was first introduced to the game in the fall of 1988 when I accompanied 30 University of Redlands students to our Salzburg campus for a semester of study together. We played Hacky Sack all over Europe. I remember one spirited game in the plaza in front of St. Peters, Rome. A too-swift kick resulted in the footbag landing on top of a Polish tour bus. It was lost for good, and we figured it might have made its way back to Poland.
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NEWS
August 9, 2002 | SHAWN HUBLER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The 23rd Annual World Footbag Championships opened here this week with good vibes and scant fanfare, despite the fact that they coincide with the 30th anniversary of the Hacky Sack this year. Yes, there is a world championship featuring that little beanbag kicking game that Deadheads used to play in circles. "Hunh," a middle-aged bureaucrat marveled outside one of the heats at the UC San Francisco student union. "People actually still do that?"
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NEWS
September 18, 1995 | MICHAEL COLTON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
On a hot, crowded Saturday at Venice Beach, Pat King, 19, spots two guys kicking around a Hacky Sack. Hoping to play, too, he whispers the secret password recognized at hack circles around the world: "Mind if I join in?" The Olympics claim to promote peace and unity, but any hacker will tell you the true goodwill game is Hacky Sack. It has kept warrior guards awake in ancient China, warmed up the legs of soccer players, and helped treat sports injuries by stretching muscles and tendons.
NEWS
September 22, 1995
Thanks for Michael Colton's interesting story about Hacky Sack, "The Goodwill Game" (Sept. 18). I was first introduced to the game in the fall of 1988 when I accompanied 30 University of Redlands students to our Salzburg campus for a semester of study together. We played Hacky Sack all over Europe. I remember one spirited game in the plaza in front of St. Peters, Rome. A too-swift kick resulted in the footbag landing on top of a Polish tour bus. It was lost for good, and we figured it might have made its way back to Poland.
NEWS
August 9, 2002 | SHAWN HUBLER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The 23rd Annual World Footbag Championships opened here this week with good vibes and scant fanfare, despite the fact that they coincide with the 30th anniversary of the Hacky Sack this year. Yes, there is a world championship featuring that little beanbag kicking game that Deadheads used to play in circles. "Hunh," a middle-aged bureaucrat marveled outside one of the heats at the UC San Francisco student union. "People actually still do that?"
BUSINESS
December 10, 1997 | Bloomberg News
Mattel Inc. said it agreed to sell its Mattel Sports division to closely held Wham-O Inc. for an undisclosed price as the El Segundo-based company continues to focus on its core brands by shedding non-core businesses. Wham-O, a toy company formed to acquire and reinvigorate classic toy brands, is majority owned by closely held investment firm Charterhouse Group International Inc.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 31, 1997 | BRENDA LOREE
Skate Street is bringing two international competitions to the park in the next few weeks. On Saturday and Sunday, the 29,000-square-foot facility plays host to the Vans Amateur World Skating Contest. Sanctioned by the United Skateboard Federation Inc., the Vans Am runs from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. both days. Street competition is on Saturday and vertical competition is on Sunday. For spectators, the cost is $5 each day and includes a pair of Vans sunglasses or a Vans hacky sack. Nov.
NEWS
December 6, 1990 | RAY RIPTON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Kurt Sonderegger and his fellow enthusiasts wouldn't mind if the sport they love caught on in the United States as soccer did in the 1960s. The sport in question is sepak takraw, and Sonderegger is the manager and an alternate player on a team of Americans that begins play today in the World Sepak Takraw Championships in Bangkok, Thailand.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 31, 2007 | Robert Abele, Special to The Times
Flapping fans may have been replaced by battery-operated spritzing whirrers, computers are missed as much as mommies, and attention deficit meds are as common as hot dogs and Jell-O, but the yearly school-break tradition of kids attending woodsy retreats continues. Bradley Beesley and Sarah Price's soft, brisk and generally surface-deep documentary "Summercamp!"
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 18, 1995
Just what we've been waiting for: a coffeehouse with gold card private membership and maybe valet parking. The Insomnia Cafe, which annoyed its Sherman Oaks neighbors for more than three years with its late hours and noisy customers, is converting to a private, members-only coffeehouse as of today, owner John Dunn said in a surprise announcement Thursday.
NEWS
September 18, 1995 | MICHAEL COLTON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
On a hot, crowded Saturday at Venice Beach, Pat King, 19, spots two guys kicking around a Hacky Sack. Hoping to play, too, he whispers the secret password recognized at hack circles around the world: "Mind if I join in?" The Olympics claim to promote peace and unity, but any hacker will tell you the true goodwill game is Hacky Sack. It has kept warrior guards awake in ancient China, warmed up the legs of soccer players, and helped treat sports injuries by stretching muscles and tendons.
NEWS
May 28, 1999 | ARA NAJARIAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The instruction manual for fun is simple. Bag it. Not sure what that means? Try footbag in all its forms. Those participating in the Southern California Footbag Championships at Hermosa Beach recently might even say "In all its glory." Footbag? So you're not really sure what that is. It's very literal, but most are probably more familiar with the trade name: Hacky Sack. A niche sport to be sure, but perhaps it's the niche for your athletic itch.
NEWS
December 29, 1991 | THE SOCIAL CLIMES STAFF
Who knows, maybe Rollerblading got its start in Tibet. The local non-contact (breaking bones is not the object), non-sexist (girls can play too), non-commercial (no free Nikes, much less athletic scholarships) sports scene has long been open to multicultural additions. The latest is buka . Imported from Southeast Asia, buka is played a little like Hacky Sack.
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