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Hae Kyung Lee

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November 9, 1996 | VICTORIA LOOSELEAF, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
If dancer-choreographer Hae Kyung Lee were to have her own theme park, it would consist of a steady stream of Steve Moshier Muzak, Stephen Bennett's cool lighting, lots of sexy costumes (both diaphanous and skimpy) and a series of postmodern undulations that the Korean American artist would design in order to transport the thrill-seeking audience into her visionary world. A "Lee-ticket," if you will. Would it succeed? Not always.
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ENTERTAINMENT
June 30, 2008 | Sara Wolf, Special to The Times
At her best, choreographer Hae Kyung Lee can alter one's perception, transforming bone and muscle into a field of fluctuating vibration or flowing motion. Indeed, with her proclivity for combining the meditative with the highly athletic, perceptual flux is necessary for the work to cohere into something more than an amalgamation of opposing energies and elements. Otherwise, Lee's dances can look overstuffed and, well, just plain awkward.
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ENTERTAINMENT
June 30, 2008 | Sara Wolf, Special to The Times
At her best, choreographer Hae Kyung Lee can alter one's perception, transforming bone and muscle into a field of fluctuating vibration or flowing motion. Indeed, with her proclivity for combining the meditative with the highly athletic, perceptual flux is necessary for the work to cohere into something more than an amalgamation of opposing energies and elements. Otherwise, Lee's dances can look overstuffed and, well, just plain awkward.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 16, 2007 | Victoria Looseleaf, Special to The Times
Dancer-choreographer Hae Kyung Lee, clad in a scarlet satin slip onstage at Cal State L.A.'s State Playhouse on Friday night, offered alternating depictions of rampant ecstasy and butoh-like inevitability in a ferocious performance of beating-heart virtuosity. Her solo was one of three premieres in a concert titled "Salm" -- Korean for "daily life." The other works were performed by her 15-year-old locally based troupe, Hae Kyung Lee and Dancers.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 22, 2006
I agree with Chris Pasles that there was "a high wow factor" to some of the work presented by the Diavolo Dance Theatre ["Getting Its Ideas Out in the Open," July 17]. I disagree that in using the California Plaza, "perhaps no other company has used the outdoor facility so extensively and imaginatively." The boring pieces "Door Explorations" or the daringly exciting "Trajectoire" can equally be executed and appreciated outdoors or indoors in a traditional theater. I would say that "no other company has used the outdoor facility so extensively and imaginatively" than Hae Kyung Lee and Dancers (2000)
ENTERTAINMENT
April 16, 2007 | Victoria Looseleaf, Special to The Times
Dancer-choreographer Hae Kyung Lee, clad in a scarlet satin slip onstage at Cal State L.A.'s State Playhouse on Friday night, offered alternating depictions of rampant ecstasy and butoh-like inevitability in a ferocious performance of beating-heart virtuosity. Her solo was one of three premieres in a concert titled "Salm" -- Korean for "daily life." The other works were performed by her 15-year-old locally based troupe, Hae Kyung Lee and Dancers.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 30, 2003 | Victoria Looseleaf, Special to The Times
Silent screams. A sea of sorrow. The body as a temple for redemption. Welcome to the world of Hae Kyung Lee, a fearless artist whose latest work, "Caught Between Boundaries," journeys to a netherworld of emotion and pain. Fastidiously performed by Hae Kyung Lee and Dancers on Saturday, this 30-minute triptych, recently mounted in Germany and South Korea, left the audience at Cal State L.A.'s State Playhouse stunned. And, to those willing to go there, in a province of awe.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 10, 2002 | LEWIS SEGAL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The annual COLA (City of Los Angeles) performance series began Friday with new one-act works by performance artist Tim Miller and contemporary choreographer Hae Kyung Lee on two stages in the Los Angeles Theatre Center. In "Us," Miller said goodbye to Los Angeles just a few blocks from the old Los Angeles Contemporary Exhibitions site where he made a major breakthrough in 1984 with "Postwar."
ENTERTAINMENT
November 30, 1997 | Victoria Looseleaf
The DanceWest program includes the following works: Friday "Confrontation," Hae Kyung Lee & Dancers, a rumination on inner conflict. "Sleep (making peace with the angels)," Pat Graney Company, an examination of the dream state, with a contribution from ceramic artist Marilyn Lysohir. "Windscape," Oguri, an examination of what the choreographer calls an uncontrollable element. "Quatre" (Four), Diavolo Dance Theater, a revision of Heim's signature piece "The Cage."
ENTERTAINMENT
July 22, 2006
I agree with Chris Pasles that there was "a high wow factor" to some of the work presented by the Diavolo Dance Theatre ["Getting Its Ideas Out in the Open," July 17]. I disagree that in using the California Plaza, "perhaps no other company has used the outdoor facility so extensively and imaginatively." The boring pieces "Door Explorations" or the daringly exciting "Trajectoire" can equally be executed and appreciated outdoors or indoors in a traditional theater. I would say that "no other company has used the outdoor facility so extensively and imaginatively" than Hae Kyung Lee and Dancers (2000)
ENTERTAINMENT
June 30, 2003 | Victoria Looseleaf, Special to The Times
Silent screams. A sea of sorrow. The body as a temple for redemption. Welcome to the world of Hae Kyung Lee, a fearless artist whose latest work, "Caught Between Boundaries," journeys to a netherworld of emotion and pain. Fastidiously performed by Hae Kyung Lee and Dancers on Saturday, this 30-minute triptych, recently mounted in Germany and South Korea, left the audience at Cal State L.A.'s State Playhouse stunned. And, to those willing to go there, in a province of awe.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 10, 2002 | LEWIS SEGAL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The annual COLA (City of Los Angeles) performance series began Friday with new one-act works by performance artist Tim Miller and contemporary choreographer Hae Kyung Lee on two stages in the Los Angeles Theatre Center. In "Us," Miller said goodbye to Los Angeles just a few blocks from the old Los Angeles Contemporary Exhibitions site where he made a major breakthrough in 1984 with "Postwar."
ENTERTAINMENT
November 9, 1996 | VICTORIA LOOSELEAF, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
If dancer-choreographer Hae Kyung Lee were to have her own theme park, it would consist of a steady stream of Steve Moshier Muzak, Stephen Bennett's cool lighting, lots of sexy costumes (both diaphanous and skimpy) and a series of postmodern undulations that the Korean American artist would design in order to transport the thrill-seeking audience into her visionary world. A "Lee-ticket," if you will. Would it succeed? Not always.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 13, 1985 | LEWIS SEGAL, Times Dance Writer
Since a feminist sensibility has always been central to modern dance, it came as no surprise that the "Visions" programs, Friday and Saturday in the Japan America Theatre, focused on women's perceptions and states of feeling. More unexpected in this ambitious multi-choreographer dance event, however, was the prevailing sense of isolation. In her repetitive, hourlong "Solitudes," Emilie Conrad-Da'oud created three slightly overlapping character solos about desperate loneliness.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 1, 2001
* "The Most Happy Fella," a Reprise! Semin-staged production of the Frank Loesser musical, plays Nov. 7 through 18 at UCLA's Freud Playhouse, Westwood, (310) 825-2101. $55-$60. * "Honk!," International City Theatre's production of "The Ugly Duckling"-based musical comedy by British team George Stiles and Anthony Drewe, plays Nov. 9 through Dec. 9 at the Center Theatre, Long Beach Performing Arts Center, 300 E. Ocean Blvd., Long Beach, (562) 436-4610. $31-$39; opening night, $50-$60.
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