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Haing S Ngor

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 8, 1996 | LORENZA MUNOZ, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Nearly 100 members of Orange County's Cambodian community on Thursday honored Haing S. Ngor, who was slain outside his Los Angeles home, for helping to bring the plight of Cambodians under the Khmer Rouge to worldwide attention. Ngor, 55, was shot to death Feb. 25 as he got out of his car. The killer remains unidentified. At a memorial service at Cambodian Family Inc., an education and resource center, Cambodian Americans remembered the Oscar-winning actor Thursday for his contributions.
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ENTERTAINMENT
July 17, 2013 | By David Ng
Haing S. Ngor won an Academy Award for portraying a survivor of Cambodia's Khmer Rouge regime in the 1984 movie "The Killing Fields," but his own life story offers an equally riveting and dramatic tale. That's the audience hook for a new stage play based on the life and untimely death of the doctor-turned-actor. Although the playwright contends that he was scrupulous in adapting Ngor's life for the theater, the estate of the late Oscar winner has come out against the play, threatening to take legal action against the writer.
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NEWS
February 27, 1996 | KENNETH CHANG and ERIC MALNIC, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Academy Award-winning actor Haing S. Ngor--who survived the savage horrors of the Khmer Rouge before starring in "The Killing Fields," a movie about the brutality in his native Cambodia--was found shot to death outside his apartment near Dodger Stadium, police said Monday. The motive for the shooting was unknown, detectives said. But the victim's cousin, Pich S. Dom, guessed that it might be revenge by the Khmer Rouge while neighbors thought that Ngor probably died during a robbery.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 20, 1998 | STEVE BERRY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
After hearing a tearful niece say her Oscar-winning uncle saved her from "the killing fields of Cambodia," a Superior Court judge Tuesday sentenced three admitted gang members to long prison terms for the robbery and murder of Haing Ngor two years ago in Chinatown. "He was a provider for orphans, widows and handicapped victims of the Cambodian holocaust," said Sophia Ngor, whose parents were killed by the Khmer Rouge rulers of her native land when she was 5.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 14, 1996
The Los Angeles City Council on Wednesday offered $25,000 for information leading to the arrest and conviction of the person or people responsible for the murder of Dr. Haing S. Ngor. Ngor, best known locally for his Academy Award-winning performance in the movie "The Killing Fields," was shot to death near Chinatown on Feb. 25 around 8:30 p.m. as he got out of his car.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 28, 1996 | K. CONNIE KANG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Many Cambodians in Southern California debated Tuesday why Academy Award-winning actor Haing S. Ngor was shot to death, but some wondered if assassination was the motive because he had tried to bring perpetrators of the Cambodian holocaust to trial before an international tribunal. "We cannot rule out a political motive," said Borann Duong, editor of Cam News, a Cambodian-language newspaper in Long Beach.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 27, 1996 | ERIC MALNIC, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Murder charges were filed Friday against three men suspected of shooting Academy Award-winning actor and Cambodian activist Haing S. Ngor to death in February outside his apartment near Dodger Stadium. Tak Sun Tan, 19, of Alhambra was arrested Friday afternoon, the Los Angeles County district attorney's office said. Jason Chan, 18, and Idra Lim, 19, both of Los Angeles, were already in police custody in connection with an unrelated robbery, officials said.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 17, 1998 | DANIEL YI and GREG KRIKORIAN, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Three Chinatown gang members were convicted by separate juries Thursday of murdering human rights activist and Oscar-winning actor Haing Ngor, who escaped Cambodia's infamous "killing fields" only to be gunned down outside his Los Angeles apartment in a 1996 robbery. The convictions of Tak Sun Tan, 21, and 20-year-olds Jason Chan and Indra Lim came on the same day that authorities in Cambodia confirmed the fatal heart attack of Pol Pot, whose murderous regime claimed more than 1 million lives.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 7, 1996 | K. CONNIE KANG and JEFF LEEDS, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Until his death 11 days ago, actor Haing S. Ngor was the most visible champion of the little-known international effort to bring the leaders of the Pol Pot regime in Cambodia to justice. "I feel like I lost my twin brother," said Dith Pran, who worked with Ngor for more than a decade to rouse global public opinion over the deaths of 1.7 million Cambodians at the hands of the Khmer Rouge. "Now I'll have to continue with one hand, carrying Ngor's picture and spirit with me."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 24, 1998 | MILES CORWIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In a highly unusual action Monday, the judge in the trial of three men suspected of killing Oscar-winning actor Haing Ngor banned reporters from the courtroom after they refused to comply with his order not to report on the opening statement. Superior Court Judge J.D. Smith said that he asked reporters to withhold information because each of the three defendants has a separate jury.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 17, 1998 | DANIEL YI and GREG KRIKORIAN, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Three Chinatown gang members were convicted by separate juries Thursday of murdering human rights activist and Oscar-winning actor Haing Ngor, who escaped Cambodia's infamous "killing fields" only to be gunned down outside his Los Angeles apartment in a 1996 robbery. The convictions of Tak Sun Tan, 21, and 20-year-olds Jason Chan and Indra Lim came on the same day that authorities in Cambodia confirmed the fatal heart attack of Pol Pot, whose murderous regime claimed more than 1 million lives.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 25, 1998 | DANIEL YI, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A day after banning reporters from the courtroom where three men are being tried in the slaying of actor Haing Ngor, a judge Tuesday rescinded his ruling and made transcripts of the court proceedings available to the media. In an unusual arrangement, separate juries have been impaneled for each of the defendants--Tak Sun Tan, 21, Jason Chan, 20, and Indra Lim, 20. The men are charged with robbing and murdering Ngor, 55, in his apartment's carport two years ago.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 24, 1998 | MILES CORWIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In a highly unusual action Monday, the judge in the trial of three men suspected of killing Oscar-winning actor Haing Ngor banned reporters from the courtroom after they refused to comply with his order not to report on the opening statement. Superior Court Judge J.D. Smith said that he asked reporters to withhold information because each of the three defendants has a separate jury.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 10, 1996
A key witness who identified the three suspected killers of Oscar-winning actor Haing Ngor recanted his testimony Monday, saying police told him which suspects to pick out and what story to tell. Earlier in the preliminary hearing, Sarik Vireak had told the judge that he was frightened as he gave testimony against the three alleged gang members accused of killing the Cambodian actor.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 27, 1996 | ERIC MALNIC, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Murder charges were filed Friday against three men suspected of shooting Academy Award-winning actor and Cambodian activist Haing S. Ngor to death in February outside his apartment near Dodger Stadium. Tak Sun Tan, 19, of Alhambra was arrested Friday afternoon, the Los Angeles County district attorney's office said. Jason Chan, 18, and Idra Lim, 19, both of Los Angeles, were already in police custody in connection with an unrelated robbery, officials said.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 14, 1996
The Los Angeles City Council on Wednesday offered $25,000 for information leading to the arrest and conviction of the person or people responsible for the murder of Dr. Haing S. Ngor. Ngor, best known locally for his Academy Award-winning performance in the movie "The Killing Fields," was shot to death near Chinatown on Feb. 25 around 8:30 p.m. as he got out of his car.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 25, 1989 | JERRY BUCK, Associated Press Television Writer
Academy Award-winner Haing Ngor will appear Sunday in a half-hour documentary called "Beyond the Killing Fields" that he hopes will "wake up the world" to the plight of Cambodian refugees. "The documentary shows the work I'm doing and is about the suffering of the people at the border," he said. "We must wake up the world. Why has the world forgotten Cambodia and especially its children? "Before 'The Killing Fields,' no one knew what happened in Cambodia. The Khmer Rouge killed 4 million people.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 20, 1998 | STEVE BERRY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
After hearing a tearful niece say her Oscar-winning uncle saved her from "the killing fields of Cambodia," a Superior Court judge Tuesday sentenced three admitted gang members to long prison terms for the robbery and murder of Haing Ngor two years ago in Chinatown. "He was a provider for orphans, widows and handicapped victims of the Cambodian holocaust," said Sophia Ngor, whose parents were killed by the Khmer Rouge rulers of her native land when she was 5.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 8, 1996 | LORENZA MUNOZ, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Nearly 100 members of Orange County's Cambodian community on Thursday honored Haing S. Ngor, who was slain outside his Los Angeles home, for helping to bring the plight of Cambodians under the Khmer Rouge to worldwide attention. Ngor, 55, was shot to death Feb. 25 as he got out of his car. The killer remains unidentified. At a memorial service at Cambodian Family Inc., an education and resource center, Cambodian Americans remembered the Oscar-winning actor Thursday for his contributions.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 7, 1996 | K. CONNIE KANG and JEFF LEEDS, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Until his death 11 days ago, actor Haing S. Ngor was the most visible champion of the little-known international effort to bring the leaders of the Pol Pot regime in Cambodia to justice. "I feel like I lost my twin brother," said Dith Pran, who worked with Ngor for more than a decade to rouse global public opinion over the deaths of 1.7 million Cambodians at the hands of the Khmer Rouge. "Now I'll have to continue with one hand, carrying Ngor's picture and spirit with me."
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