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Haing S Ngor

NEWS
March 10, 1996 | K. CONNIE KANG and JEFF LEEDS, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Until his death Feb. 25, actor Haing S. Ngor was the most visible champion of the little-known international effort to bring the leaders of the Pol Pot regime in Cambodia to justice. "I feel like I lost my twin brother," said Dith Pran, who worked with Ngor for more than a decade to rouse global public opinion over the deaths of 1.7 million Cambodians at the hands of the Khmer Rouge. "Now I'll have to continue with one hand, carrying Ngor's picture and spirit with me."
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 8, 1996 | LORENZA MUNOZ, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Nearly 100 members of Orange County's Cambodian community on Thursday honored Haing S. Ngor, who was slain outside his Los Angeles home, for helping to bring the plight of Cambodians under the Khmer Rouge to worldwide attention. Ngor, 55, was shot to death Feb. 25 as he got out of his car. The killer remains unidentified. At a memorial service at Cambodian Family Inc., an education and resource center, Cambodian Americans remembered the Oscar-winning actor Thursday for his contributions.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 7, 1996 | K. CONNIE KANG and JEFF LEEDS, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Until his death 11 days ago, actor Haing S. Ngor was the most visible champion of the little-known international effort to bring the leaders of the Pol Pot regime in Cambodia to justice. "I feel like I lost my twin brother," said Dith Pran, who worked with Ngor for more than a decade to rouse global public opinion over the deaths of 1.7 million Cambodians at the hands of the Khmer Rouge. "Now I'll have to continue with one hand, carrying Ngor's picture and spirit with me."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 28, 1996 | K. CONNIE KANG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Many Cambodians in Southern California debated Tuesday why Academy Award-winning actor Haing S. Ngor was shot to death, but some wondered if assassination was the motive because he had tried to bring perpetrators of the Cambodian holocaust to trial before an international tribunal. "We cannot rule out a political motive," said Borann Duong, editor of Cam News, a Cambodian-language newspaper in Long Beach.
NEWS
February 27, 1996 | KENNETH CHANG and ERIC MALNIC, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Academy Award-winning actor Haing S. Ngor--who survived the savage horrors of the Khmer Rouge before starring in "The Killing Fields," a movie about the brutality in his native Cambodia--was found shot to death outside his apartment near Dodger Stadium, police said Monday. The motive for the shooting was unknown, detectives said. But the victim's cousin, Pich S. Dom, guessed that it might be revenge by the Khmer Rouge while neighbors thought that Ngor probably died during a robbery.
NEWS
February 27, 1996 | LORENZA MUNOZ, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Members of Orange County's Cambodian community on Monday mourned the loss of Dr. Haing Ngor, a man who many considered a role model who brought the Cambodian massacres of the mid- to late '70s to international attention.
NEWS
September 12, 1989 | ELIZABETH LU, Times Staff Writer
On Aug. 17, Haing Ngor, winner of an Academy Award for his role in "The Killing Fields," stepped off a plane in Phnom Penh and saw his homeland for the first time since 1979, when he fled the brutal rule of the Communist Khmer Rouge. During his stay in the capital city, there were happy moments, such as his reunion with a younger brother he had not seen in 15 years. But mainly, what he saw saddened him.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 25, 1989 | JERRY BUCK, Associated Press Television Writer
Academy Award-winner Haing Ngor will appear Sunday in a half-hour documentary called "Beyond the Killing Fields" that he hopes will "wake up the world" to the plight of Cambodian refugees. "The documentary shows the work I'm doing and is about the suffering of the people at the border," he said. "We must wake up the world. Why has the world forgotten Cambodia and especially its children? "Before 'The Killing Fields,' no one knew what happened in Cambodia. The Khmer Rouge killed 4 million people.
NEWS
February 15, 1988 | DAVID DEVOSS, Times Staff Writer
The tiny, two-bedroom apartment just east of Chinatown is not the sort of place one expects to find a best-selling author, much less an award-winning actor. Blistering plaster and threadbare carpets complement furniture best described as "serviceable." Only a large temple rubbing from Angkor Wat and a wall covered with awards bespeak the occupant's origin and accomplishments. Dwarfed by a statue of a standing Buddha, his 1985 Oscar for best supporting actor is accorded no special place of honor.
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