Advertisement
 
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsHair
IN THE NEWS

Hair

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
July 13, 1990 | PADDY CALISTRO, Calistro writes a beauty column for The Times Sunday magazine.
This summer's newest hairstyles come straight from the history books--1960s history, that is. Back-combed "bubbles," wash-and-wear geometrics, and hippie-like, long, straight styles are being reshaped. At Cristophe and Vidal Sassoon, two top Beverly Hills salons, recent shows featured versions of looks first seen on the pages of Vogue and Harper's Bazaar more than 20 years ago.
ARTICLES BY DATE
SPORTS
March 27, 2014 | Bill Dwyre
Just in case anybody wonders, Don King is alive and well. Actually, more so than ever. He is 82 going on 50. The hair doesn't quite stand on end in its salute to electrical shock treatments as it once did. That's because there isn't enough of it anymore. But the faded American flag jacket, and the big cigar that he just kind of chews on, and the five or six layers of jeweled necklaces, and the American flag tie, remain standard props. Also standard is the hilarious babble with which he promotes a boxing match from a podium.
Advertisement
IMAGE
January 22, 2012 | By Adam Tschorn, Los Angeles Times
If you're thinking about trying out the latest trend in men's hairstyles, here are a few pointers from the experts on how to do the 'do. What should I ask for? Some folks refer to it as an undercut. Others call it the Jimmy, the Darmody or the Michael Pitt. J.P. Mastey, who owns the Baxter Finley Barber & Shop, says requests even include "the haircut like the young guy with the limp on that old-timey HBO series. " Although most barbers and stylists will probably know what you're talking about, Supercuts senior artistic director Melanie Ash offers a concise description: "Ask for a cut that's shorter through the sides, clippered up all the way, disconnected and left with length through the top. " Or take in a photo of the style.
IMAGE
March 22, 2014 | By Melissa Magsaysay
Do you ever find yourself running out of the house with wet hair? That's apparently become a good thing, right in line with a beauty trend seen recently on pop stars and in edgy fashion editorials. A new hairstyle dubbed the "wob" (for wet bob) has reached "It" hair status after Beyoncé sported a wet-looking bob-length 'do at the Grammy Awards in February. Miley Cyrus also had damp-looking tresses on the March cover of W magazine, as did Sofia Coppola on the February cover of Italian Vogue.
IMAGE
January 29, 2012 | By Kavita Daswani, Special to the Los Angeles Times
For most men, it's about staying competitive in a youth-focused workplace. For others, it's a need to keep up with new young wives. And for some, well, they just like the sleek black tops on those "Jersey Shore" boys. These are among the reasons stylists say that more men - including those in their late 40s and older and those at senior corporate levels - are dyeing their hair, shedding the shame that was once attached to the practice. Hair salons across the board - from inexpensive chains to ritzy Beverly Hills places - are noticing a rise in the number of men coming in for color treatments, hoping that covering the gray will help them hang onto jobs or put them on the fast-track at work.
HEALTH
June 2, 2012
Woolly trivia: • The hair on your head grows at about 0.00000001 miles per hour. That's a half-inch per month. • Every day, the 5 million or so hairs on an adult's body add about 40 yards of new growth. • At any given moment, about 90% of the hairs on your head are growing and 10% are getting ready to abandon ship. • Even on a good day, about 100 hairs from your head will fall out. • The average person could lose tens of thousands of hairs from their scalp without really noticing a difference.
IMAGE
October 25, 2009 | Alene Dawson
When it comes to beauty products, sometimes ignorance is bliss. Snake venom, bird droppings, snail serum, cow dung and whale vomit are but a few of the industry's extreme and off-putting ingredients that one might be shocked to know can be slathered about your body. Hair products are no exception to this somewhat creepy phenomenon. Consumers hoping for a hair miracle are willing to pay extra for deep conditioners and conditioning "treatments" that promise an enviable crowning glory -- even when they contain rather odd-seeming ingredients such as placenta, caviar and hemp.
IMAGE
November 22, 2009
Tips for mixed hair The experts shared a few tips on how to manage your little-bit-of-this and little-bit-of-that terrifically unique tresses: Always go to someone who knows how to work with your hair texture and who is a color expert. Don't relax and color you hair. Do only one or the other or you'll end up with damaged hair. Try Keratin/protein treatments for dry, damaged hair. Always use a thermal protection product when blowing out hair. For frizzy hair, use a water-based dry pomade.
HEALTH
July 13, 2009 | Kathleen Clary Miller
I am making a statement tantamount to a terminal patient raising her hand in protest and announcing, "No more treatments!" Mine is not over something life-threatening, though. After 13 years of it, I am just saying "no" to color: Let the gray grow in! "Aren't you afraid you'll look like 'The Picture of Dorian Gray' -- ancient overnight?" asks one Southern California friend. "But you'll look older!" protests another. Guess what? I am older. And I'm tired of trying so hard to deny it.
IMAGE
December 6, 2009
Hair color glossary of terms Highlights Color is mixed with a developer (most often hydrogen peroxide) into a formula used to lighten hair in streaks. The mixture is applied to strands of dry hair that are then wrapped in foil. Alternatively, a cap with hair threaded through small holes can be used, but the uniform strips can appear unnatural. Lowlights The application technique is similar to highlights, but instead of lightening strands, a darker shade than the base color is applied to hair.
NEWS
March 3, 2014 | By Melissa Magsaysay
Easy and effortless looks ruled the red carpet at Sunday's Academy Awards. Maybe it was the rainy weather that had actresses abandoning a potentially runny smoky eye or sticky up-do shellacked with hair spray in favor of more subtle Oscar looks. Many actresses sported the sleek pixie cut that is so hot right now. Charlize Theron, Anne Hathaway, Kristin Chenoweth and Jennifer Lawrence led the chic short-hair brigade. Lupita Nyong'o topped her short hair off with the accessory of the evening - a delicate gold and diamond headband from Fred Leighton.
NEWS
March 2, 2014 | By Melissa Magsaysay
Hair experts predicted tight and neat up 'dos in order to beat the wet weather, but it seems that actresses on the Oscars red carpet were doing everything but. With the exception of Amy Adams, who was sporting an almost angular up 'do with her deep blue Gucci gown, most of the women Sunday night were wearing their hair long, loose and soft with no fear of having the volume deflate because of rain or humidity. There were plenty of Veronica Lake-inspired side parts and sweeps --- a classic style that seems to pop up at the Oscars every year.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 2, 2014 | By Betsy Sharkey, Los Angeles Times Film Critic
An Oscar, whether it is for lead actress or for makeup and hair, weighs exactly the same (8.5 pounds). A win in production design represents a level of achievement in a craft on par with best director. The night for all the winners is just as golden - same stars overhead. Yet there is a different, dimmer spotlight on the below-the-line contenders. Their red carpet walk will go unnoted, their gowns and tuxedo flair overlooked and their heartfelt speeches mostly unremembered or rudely cut short.
NEWS
March 2, 2014 | By Melissa Magsaysay
Kerry Washington's baby bump, draped in custom Jason Wu, was at the center of her gorgeous Oscar ensemble, but her relaxed waves punctuated the look. Takisha Sturdivant-Drew, Washington's hair stylist of the last 15 years, breaks down the "Scandal" star's winning Oscar beauty: "I saw the Jason Wu dress and knew right away that she had to have a lot of hair and texture," says Sturdivant-Drew. "Also, I wanted it to look kind of beachy, because of the dress was strapless and skin baring.
NEWS
February 28, 2014 | By Melissa Magsaysay
It's a fashion and beauty conundrum that could only exist in L.A.: How will a star attending this year's Oscars avoid a drenched hemline or deflated hairdo if it's still raining on Sunday afternoon? The last time there was a rainy Oscar red carpet was 2010, and even though this week's storm comes during a severe drought, Hollywood isn't used to having its glamour compromised by the elements. After months of preparation and negotiating the right dress from the right designer, plus hair and makeup trials, Hollywood's best fashion pros may be rethinking their game plan or at the very least implementing every trick in the book to ensure their clients look as flawless as if it were 75 degrees and sunny.
NEWS
February 25, 2014 | By Ingrid Schmidt, This post has been corrected, as indicated below:
Hairstylist Federic Fekkai's customers can get personal. “There are women who like to shock me by saying, 'Oh, I thought about you this morning … in my shower,'” he says. But he can laugh because he knows they are referring to his namesake shampoo and conditioner. “We want people to be responding emotionally," he adds. "The way I created this product is for it to be a great experience.” Make that an A-list experience. For more than 20 years, Fekkai -- in town last week to visit his West Coast flagship salon -- has worked on some of the world's most famous heads, names including Scarlett Johansson and Uma Thurman, Claudia Schiffer and Catherine Deneuve.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 6, 2013 | By Christie D'Zurilla
First, Pamela Anderson went pixie short with her blond hair, and now she's gone brunette! The "Baywatch" actress revealed her new look this week during Art Basel 2013 in Miami Beach, Fla. Though she's shown above at a different event on Thursday, Anderson debuted the new 'do on Tuesday, according to People. That event honored her photographer friend Raphael Mazzucco, who told the mag: "Last week we did an incredible shoot, very fantastic. "With her short hair she's giving a whole different vibe.
IMAGE
September 6, 2009 | Whitney Friedlander
Poufed, permed or punctuated with pink and purple spikes, the hair styles of the 1980s exemplified the decade of excess. "It was all about big and extreme," says Snooky Bellomo, who with her sister Tish owns the Manic Panic stores. Now, with miniskirts, leggings and neon fabrics once again wardrobe staples, ready your Aqua Net: Teases, crimps and other stiff coifs are rising up like "Thriller" zombies. You won't see reinterpretations of the decade's ubiquitous and unisex perms or Michael Jackson-esque Jheri curls -- today's style savants don't want anything so "rigid," says Redken creative consultant Guido, who styled Marc Jacobs' fall 2009 neon runway show.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 21, 2014 | By Michael Hiltzik
On March 18, 2011, an official from the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission named Chuck Casto called together the NRC delegation on assignment with him in Tokyo. "We're in never-never land," he told them. Seven days earlier, a magnitude 9 earthquake had rattled a complex of six nuclear power plants known as Fukushima Daiichi, roughly 150 miles northeast of Tokyo. Then came nature's second, more devastating blow: a tsunami that swamped the complex, flooding its electrical generators and putting its three operating reactors out of commission.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 15, 2014 | By Susan King
"American Hustle," "Dallas Buyers Club" and "Behind the Candelabra" were among the winners of the Make-Up Artists and Hair Stylists Guild Awards, set for Saturday evening at the Paramount Studios Theatre. Candance Neal and Robert Stevenson won for best contemporary hairstyling for "Lee Daniels' The Butler," while Donald Mowat and Pamela Westmore earned the trophy for contemporary makeup for "Prisoners. " Kathrine Gordon and Michelle Johnson won the prize for period and/or character hairstyling for "American Hustle," and Robin Mathews won the guild award for makeup in that category for "Dallas Buyers Club.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|