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SCIENCE
October 21, 2013 | By Monte Morin
In a feat that may provide hope to men and women who suffer from hair loss, researchers said they had successfully grown hair follicles in human flesh using implanted donor cells. While rodents have the ability to regenerate lost hair, scientists have so far been unable to trigger re-growth in humans. Instead, they traditionally treat hair loss by removing hair follicles from the back of a patient's head and transplanting them to another area of the scalp. Now, in a study published Monday in the journal PNAS , researchers used lab methods to simulate the behavior of rodent cells in order to induce hair growth in human flesh.
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SCIENCE
October 21, 2013 | By Monte Morin
In a feat that may provide hope to men and women who suffer from hair loss, researchers said they had successfully grown hair follicles in human flesh using implanted donor cells. While rodents have the ability to regenerate lost hair, scientists have so far been unable to trigger re-growth in humans. Instead, they traditionally treat hair loss by removing hair follicles from the back of a patient's head and transplanting them to another area of the scalp. Now, in a study published Monday in the journal PNAS , researchers used lab methods to simulate the behavior of rodent cells in order to induce hair growth in human flesh.
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HEALTH
November 30, 1998 | THOMAS H. MAUGH II
More than 30 million males in the United States are balding or bald, a figure that explains the great success of the hair restorers Rogaine and Propecia. Many men find those drugs unsatisfactory, however. They don't work for some men, and for many others they produce only a light fuzz that is unworthy of the name "hair." Furthermore, they work only in men who have healthy hair follicles that are not currently producing hair.
NEWS
March 21, 2012 | By Melissa Healy, Los Angeles Times / For the Booster Shots blog
In mice and men, baldness is a scourge that cries out for a cure. Fortunately, a far-flung group of American researchers is on it - and on Wednesday reported progress on this front in the very sober journal Science Translational Medicine. Plucking hair follicles from the pates of 22 men with male-pattern baldness(think George Constanza here) and an army of mice, researchers detected a key difference between patches where hair was growing and patches where it was thinning or bald: In humans, a prostaglandin called PGD2 was far more plentiful in areas of the pate that were bald than in patches where hair continued to grow; and in mice, the same prostaglandin was in large supply when they were in the shedding phase of their normal hair follicle cycle.  The team was led by dermatologist Luis Garza (then of the University of Pennsylvania, now at Johns Hopkins University)
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 14, 1986
A derivative of Vitamin A may also be a potent booster to minoxidil for restoring hair loss, a dermatologist said at the annual meeting of the American Academy of Dermatology last week. Dr. Nia Terezakis told her colleagues in New Orleans that two-thirds of 56 patients whose scalps were treated with a solution of tretinoin and minoxidil grew hair on bald areas. Minoxidil is a potent high blood pressure drug that has been shown to promote hair regrowth.
HEALTH
March 1, 2010
If you're shopping for a pill or gadget to trim your waistline, grow your hair or generally make you feel better, you probably take comfort in the words "FDA approved" or "FDA registered. " Even in a time of widespread distrust of government, most people continue to put their faith in the Food and Drug Administration, says Daniel Carpenter, professor of government at Harvard University and author of the soon-to-be published book "Reputation and Power: Organizational Image and Pharmaceutical Regulation at the FDA. " "FDA approval is like the Good Housekeeping seal of approval, only much more so," Carpenter says.
NEWS
May 31, 1995 | THOMAS H. MAUGH II, TIMES MEDICAL WRITER
Scientists are close to identifying a hair-growth gene responsible for an extremely rare disease that is probably the source of ancient werewolf legends, a finding that serves as a dramatic reminder of humans' evolutionary proximity to their animal predecessors. The disease, called congenital generalized hypertrichosis, is characterized by excessive amounts of hair on the face and upper body.
NEWS
June 18, 1993 | CINDY LaFAVRE YORKS, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES; Cindy LaFavre Yorks is a regular contributor to Valley Life
With summer's arrival, the never-ending battle of the nub intensifies. You know, the con stant struggle to keep legs their smoothest. (Blame it on those Nair models.) Models aside, some women just say no to sharp blades and smelly lotions. This courageous handful accepts a trade-off. The pain of molten wax against human skin is endured in exchange for the pleasure of baring smooth legs with unbridled bravado. Waxing provides an ultra-smooth finish no razor or depilatory can match.
BUSINESS
November 20, 1989 | From United Press International
FTC Tries to Cut Short Hair Growth Business: Dr. Ilona Purola, a Finnish physician, testified in federal court in Los Angeles Thursday on behalf of Los Angeles-based Pantron I Corp., the defendant in a suit by the Federal Trade Commission. The FTC charges that Pantron made false claims about the effectiveness of its Helsinki Formula product, which is advertised as being able to stop excessive hair loss and stimulate new hair growth. The court trial is expected to be completed Tuesday, Nov. 21.
NEWS
January 15, 1985 | Associated Press
The government moved Monday to halt the marketing of non-prescription lotions and creams sold to prevent baldness or cause hair to grow, saying the advertising claims are false and misleading. The Food and Drug Administration proposed regulations that would ban the products unless a manufacturer can prove that its product is safe and effective for the advertised purpose. Nothing on the market now has been shown to be effective, the agency said.
HEALTH
March 1, 2010
If you're shopping for a pill or gadget to trim your waistline, grow your hair or generally make you feel better, you probably take comfort in the words "FDA approved" or "FDA registered. " Even in a time of widespread distrust of government, most people continue to put their faith in the Food and Drug Administration, says Daniel Carpenter, professor of government at Harvard University and author of the soon-to-be published book "Reputation and Power: Organizational Image and Pharmaceutical Regulation at the FDA. " "FDA approval is like the Good Housekeeping seal of approval, only much more so," Carpenter says.
HEALTH
January 12, 2009 | By Chris Woolston,, Los Angeles Times Staff Writer
Americans spend billions on hair-care products each year, a remarkable investment for a part of the body with no real function. We clean it, nourish it and style it -- and we definitely mourn its loss. Lots of products and procedures promise to restore thinning or disappearing hair. One especially intriguing option is the HairMax LaserComb, a hand-held laser device that supposedly revives hair follicles. Hailed on TV news programs as a potential "cure for baldness," the device received FDA clearance for men in 2007.
NEWS
February 4, 2002 | STEPHANIE SIMON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Feeling run-down? A bit saggy of spirit? Step right up to the Orgone Energy Accumulator. It looks like a coffin, but it's filled with pure energy. Sit inside and soak up vigor. Men, does your sex life need a boost? Give this prostate gland warmer a try. Women, desperate to expand your bust? Try these suction cups--in such a pretty shade of pink. Or maybe you're suffering from varicose veins? Arthritis? Kidney trouble? Spit on a piece of paper. Slip it into this box.
HEALTH
August 13, 2001 | TIMOTHY GOWER
I've been reflecting a lot lately--especially when bright light shines on the top of my head. My hairline is headed north, and I'm slowly developing a monk-like bare patch at the crown. Which is why in the last few days I've spent a few idle moments--OK, about six or seven hours--surfing the Internet to see what options are available these days for men with thinning hair. Much of the buzz online concerns a remedy that's not yet available.
HEALTH
November 30, 1998 | THOMAS H. MAUGH II
More than 30 million males in the United States are balding or bald, a figure that explains the great success of the hair restorers Rogaine and Propecia. Many men find those drugs unsatisfactory, however. They don't work for some men, and for many others they produce only a light fuzz that is unworthy of the name "hair." Furthermore, they work only in men who have healthy hair follicles that are not currently producing hair.
BUSINESS
February 13, 1997 | From Bloomberg News
Consumers will get 80% of the assets owned by a man whose Los Angeles-based company made $100 million selling a supposed baldness cure known as the "Helsinki Formula," federal officials said Wednesday. Under a settlement announced by the Federal Trade Commission, consumers will get the bulk of the money from Bankruptcy Court proceedings involving former Pantron I Corp. owner Hal Z. Lederman.
NEWS
March 17, 1987 | Associated Press
A government advisory panel Monday recommended approval of the first drug shown to make hair grow on bald men, but with the provision that doctors be instructed to tell their patients not to expect miracles. The panel of outside experts told the Food and Drug Administration it expects the agency to monitor advertising of the product to make sure the manufacturer, Upjohn Co., does not overstate what the hair grower can be expected to do.
NEWS
March 16, 1987 | United Press International
An advisory committee today recommended Food and Drug Administration approval of a drug that can help alleviate baldness, although some members expressed skepticism over how many people would benefit. The unanimous recommendation by the five-member committee is viewed as a forerunner of formal FDA approval in a few months. The Upjohn Co.
BUSINESS
June 20, 1996 | From Reuters
Ever since the biblical Samson had his locks shorn by the scheming Delilah, most men have preferred a full head of hair to the alternative. Now a number of pharmaceutical companies see a chance to grow profits along with hair and are racing to develop a new wave of anti-baldness drugs to compete with the industry's first offering, Pharmacia & Upjohn Inc.'s Rogaine.
NEWS
June 30, 1995 | TERENCE MONMANEY, TIMES MEDICAL WRITER
Working with bits of mouse skin growing in plastic dishes, researchers have used genetic engineering to inch closer to a goal that has eluded sorcerers, cosmetologists and scientists throughout history: a cure for baldness. "We think this opens the field for gene therapy of the hair process," said biochemist Robert M. Hoffman, head of AntiCancer Inc., a biotechnology firm here that is doing the work. To be sure, no such gene-therapy product for restoring long-lost hair exists.
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