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REAL ESTATE
September 27, 1987
Pantron I, manufacturing and distributor of Helsinki hair products, has purchased a 16,750-square-foot building at 8322 Beverly Blvd. for $2.55 million, according to L. J. Hooker International, which represented the buyer. A partnership represented by Coldwell Banker sold the building, in which Pantron will occupy 5,000 square feet of space beginning in December.
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HEALTH
April 5, 2014 | Mary MacVean
Amy Soergel's lip gloss was making her sick. The problem, she realized, was gluten -- hydrologized wheat protein, to be exact. Then she went to the hairdresser who used a shampoo that made her neck burn. Again, it contained gluten. "There's hidden gluten in many places you may not consider," including stamp and envelope glues, toothpaste and lip balms, says Soergel, who has a store, Naturally Soergel's, near Pittsburgh that caters to people with allergies. Indeed, for people with celiac disease, a bit of gluten that might get swallowed from a lipstick or a stream of shampoo in the shower can be enough to cause illness.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 14, 1999
A Newport Beach man is scheduled to be sentenced today to 16 months in prison after admitting a scheme to sell up to $1 million of counterfeit John Paul Mitchell hair products, authorities said. The company has a plant in Saugus. Joseph Frederick Thompson, 33, was charged in 1997 with selling 10 tractor-trailer loads of fake Mitchell-brand shampoo and conditioner to a New York distributor, but fled the country before he could be prosecuted.
SCIENCE
August 12, 2013 | By Tony Barboza
You might wonder what ingredient in a Mexican-made hair gel called Moco de Gorila - or Gorilla Snot - got its distributor in trouble with the law. It's probably not what you're thinking. It was the styling product's smog-forming compounds that prompted California air regulators to take action against Midway Importing Inc. The Houston-based company, which distributes health and beauty care products nationwide, paid $213,000 in fines for selling the line of hair gel in violation of consumer product regulations designed to protect air quality, the California Air Resources Board said Monday.
SCIENCE
August 12, 2013 | By Tony Barboza
You might wonder what ingredient in a Mexican-made hair gel called Moco de Gorila - or Gorilla Snot - got its distributor in trouble with the law. It's probably not what you're thinking. It was the styling product's smog-forming compounds that prompted California air regulators to take action against Midway Importing Inc. The Houston-based company, which distributes health and beauty care products nationwide, paid $213,000 in fines for selling the line of hair gel in violation of consumer product regulations designed to protect air quality, the California Air Resources Board said Monday.
BUSINESS
January 4, 2005
* Alberto-Culver Co., the world's No. 1 seller of hair products to salons, said it bought beauty products distributor CosmoProf of Chatsworth to expand into Los Angeles and Hawaii. Terms weren't disclosed. * SuperGen Inc., the Dublin, Calif.-based maker of the Nipent leukemia drug, said it withdrew a U.S. application to sell a pancreatic cancer medicine because regulators indicated that they would reject it.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 6, 1998 | BETTINA BOXALL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
When, after several days of trying, Madam C. J. Walker was finally allowed to speak at a 1912 convention of mostly male business owners, she described herself as a woman who started in the cotton fields of the South, was promoted to the washtub and finally promoted herself into manufacturing. Walker, the first female African American millionaire, just got another promotion: onto a first-class U.S. postage stamp. The 21st stamp in the U.S.
NEWS
September 25, 1992 | ROSE APODACA, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Hair has always served as a rebellious symbol of the times. Coco Chanel lopped off her long locks to create a defiant bob that announced independence to roaring '20s suffragettes. Four decades later, hippies wore their hair straight and long to defy an Establishment that was shipping shaved-headed men off to war.
NEWS
June 19, 1987 | DIANE REISCHEL, Times Staff Writer
If hair styles carry a social message--feminism, look out. The new word is hindsight--from smooth blankets of Veronica Lake locks to what the Sassoon people call "less aggressive" hair. The salon uses a Marilyn Monroe look-alike in photos that clinch a sex kitten message. "We're right in the middle of this gorgeous hair thing," pronounces New York modeling agent Eileen Ford. "We've all grown our hair, and I don't see anyone asking for short hair." L.A.
HEALTH
April 5, 2014 | Mary MacVean
Amy Soergel's lip gloss was making her sick. The problem, she realized, was gluten -- hydrologized wheat protein, to be exact. Then she went to the hairdresser who used a shampoo that made her neck burn. Again, it contained gluten. "There's hidden gluten in many places you may not consider," including stamp and envelope glues, toothpaste and lip balms, says Soergel, who has a store, Naturally Soergel's, near Pittsburgh that caters to people with allergies. Indeed, for people with celiac disease, a bit of gluten that might get swallowed from a lipstick or a stream of shampoo in the shower can be enough to cause illness.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 8, 2013 | By Nardine Saad
It's the shear that was heard around the world: Beyonce has a pixie cut. The pop diva shared three uncaptioned photos of her scalp-skimming 'do Wednesday on Instagram, posing demurely in a mirror as she gingerly frames shorn honey-blond locks with her hands. You can almost hear her say, "How do I look?" Big deal, you say? Kind of. Stars including Halle Berry, Anne Hathaway and Michelle Williams have all rocked out the elfin 'do for film roles and more importantly kept them to reinvent themselves, a la singers Miley Cyrus and Rihanna.  PHOTOS: Beyonce and Jay Z through the years The "Girls (We Run the World)"
IMAGE
September 9, 2012 | By Alene Dawson, Los Angeles Times
It's a notion ingrained early: September, the start of the traditional school year, is a time to start over. For the nonstudent, that may mean cleaning out your closets, enrolling in an exercise class or recommitting to New Year's resolutions. It's also a good time to review your beauty routines. You should always get rid of products that are past their expiration dates, of course. And we checked with some experts about what else to toss, keep and add this season. Makeup Tim Quinn , national director of creative artistry, Giorgio Armani Beauty Toss Heavy powder and heavy oil-based foundations: "With most of the new foundations and new technology, you don't even need a powder … this whole idea of setting your makeup is almost obsolete.
IMAGE
April 22, 2012 | By Janet Kinosian, Special to the Los Angeles Times
It's never been easier to feel like a natural woman. The 1960s mantra about getting ourselves back to the garden now applies to an increasing number of beauty products, with some small companies literally going to the garden and farm to bring customers fresh, natural, pure and organic ingredients in their hair- and skin-care items. These products provide an alternative to more mainstream offerings, which over the last half-century have become increasingly laden with synthetics that some would rather avoid.
BUSINESS
January 22, 2012 | By Ronald D. White, Los Angeles Times
The gig(s): John Paul DeJoria, 67, is co-founder and chief executive of Beverly Hills-based John Paul Mitchell Systems, a 32-year-old hair-care products line that is sold in 87 countries and logs nearly $1 billion in annual sales. The brand includes 110 Paul Mitchell schools in the U.S. DeJoria is also co-founder of the Patron Spirits Co. line of tequilas and holds interests in several other ventures. Unglamorous beginnings: "I grew up in East L.A. I didn't think it was a bad place.
NEWS
March 18, 2011 | By Shari Roan, Los Angeles Times
Hair-loss products that contain the drug finasteride and are sold under the brand names Propecia and Proscar are known to cause sexual side effects in some men. But a new study suggests that the sexual dysfunction can last for several months after stopping the medications. Researchers interviewed 71 men age 21 to 46 who were in good health but claimed they experienced sexual side effects after beginning finasteride. The men reported various problems such as erectile dysfunction (92% experienced this)
IMAGE
January 16, 2011 | By Alexandra Drosu, Special to the Los Angeles Times
Thanks to the Internet, you no longer need to trek to the far corners of the world to find the latest beauty balms. However, even in today's global market, some products are hard to get online. If you're planning a trip to any of these five cities, bring home the following beauty must-haves. Just keep the products in their original containers and remember to declare them at customs. Beirut Beesline: This affordable collection of skin, hair and body products is sold in pharmacies.
BUSINESS
January 9, 1990 | LINDA WILLIAMS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
You say your hair is falling out? Stand on your head and rub your stomach three times. You say your problem is sexual? How about putting a new, copper penny under your pillow every night. If that sounds ridiculous, more than a few Americans waste a lot of time and money on so-called cures for baldness and aphrodisiacs that have about the same chance of success, according to the Food and Drug Administration.
NEWS
January 5, 1992 | ANTHONY GIORGIANNI, THE HARTFORD COURANT
Take some garlic, rosemary, safflower oil, papaya, a bit of cucumber, lettuce and tomato and what do you have? A Caesar salad? Dinner at a posh yuppie restaurant? The recipe for your Aunt Minnie's world-famous gazpacho? Maybe. But it also could be your shampoo or conditioner. Fruits, vegetables and other exotic ingredients are popular selling points in modern hair products.
IMAGE
November 22, 2009 | By Alene Dawson
You've seen the great hair divide in the movies: "Steel Magnolias" was centered in Truvy's beauty salon, which catered to white women; Queen Latifah's "Beauty Shop," on the other hand, had a clientele that was almost exclusively black. For years, with few exceptions when it came to hair care, never the twain should meet. But today, with mixed marriages surging, hair is no longer black or white. "You are beginning to see a surge of mixed hair in hair salons," says celebrity stylist Ted Gibson of television's "What Not to Wear."
IMAGE
October 25, 2009 | Alene Dawson
When it comes to beauty products, sometimes ignorance is bliss. Snake venom, bird droppings, snail serum, cow dung and whale vomit are but a few of the industry's extreme and off-putting ingredients that one might be shocked to know can be slathered about your body. Hair products are no exception to this somewhat creepy phenomenon. Consumers hoping for a hair miracle are willing to pay extra for deep conditioners and conditioning "treatments" that promise an enviable crowning glory -- even when they contain rather odd-seeming ingredients such as placenta, caviar and hemp.
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