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Haiti Celebrations

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NEWS
October 18, 1994 | TRACY WILKINSON and KENNETH FREED, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Proof that Haiti remains extremely volatile was in evidence Monday as friendly but unruly crowds mobbed the car carrying President Jean-Bertrand Aristide and then hurled stones and insults at Haiti's senior military officer, whose family home was torched.
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ENTERTAINMENT
November 3, 1995 | LUCILLE RENWICK, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Papa Legba, open the gate / Open the gate / To let us come in. * In a Vodou ceremony, the deity Legba serves as the gatekeeper, barring anyone from connecting to other spirits in the immortal world without first going through him. In UCLA's "Sacred Arts of Haitian Vodou," the dozen featured artists are gatekeepers themselves, with their art opening doors to an enigmatic religion often misconstrued to mean zombies, pins stuck in dolls and other kinds of black magic.
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NEWS
October 16, 1994 | From Associated Press
The Security Council welcomed the return of President Jean-Bertrand Aristide to Haiti on Saturday by lifting its crippling sanctions against the Caribbean nation. The vote was 14 in favor with one abstention, Brazil. "Our hopes and our prayers are with the people of Haiti as they begin to rebuild their country," U.S. Ambassador Madeleine Albright told the council. "To the people of Haiti we say: We are with you and we will help you."
NEWS
November 3, 1994 | MARK FINEMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
U.S. combat troops took up sniper positions atop tombs Wednesday to guard President Jean-Bertrand Aristide as the former exile ventured out for a rare public visit--kneeling at a cemetery and two churches to pray for Haitian priests, politicians and thousands of others who died for him and his democratic cause under three years of military rule.
NEWS
October 16, 1994
The return to Haiti of President Jean-Bertrand Aristide inspired expressions of joy, gratitude and hope. "The 15th of October. What a beautiful day this is . . . a day to celebrate, a day of deliverance, a day of nonviolence." --Jean-Bertrand Aristide, arriving at the Haitian airport in Port-au-Prince after three years of exile * "His message of no vengeance, no violence, is the right thing to heal Haiti, attract investment and create jobs to break the cycle of poverty." --The Rev.
NEWS
November 3, 1994 | MARK FINEMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
U.S. combat troops took up sniper positions atop tombs Wednesday to guard President Jean-Bertrand Aristide as the former exile ventured out for a rare public visit--kneeling at a cemetery and two churches to pray for Haitian priests, politicians and thousands of others who died for him and his democratic cause under three years of military rule.
NEWS
February 8, 1991 | DON A. SCHANCHE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Father Jean Bertrand Aristide, a slum priest who became Haiti's first democratically elected president, was sworn into office Thursday. He immediately announced a wholesale reorganization of the once-dominant army that has been blamed for most of the impoverished country's violence and bloodshed in recent years.
NEWS
November 19, 1991 | KENNETH FREED, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Haitian army gave a parade Monday and nobody came. The occasion was the annual celebration of Haiti's defeat of French forces at the battle of Vertieres in 1803, when the onetime slave colony sealed its bid for independence. But instead of celebrating the historic victory over Napoleon's army, the Haitian people turned their backs on the military, some literally.
NEWS
November 2, 1994 | MARK FINEMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
As Haiti mourned its dead Tuesday in the heart of Port-au-Prince's main cemetery, voodoo worshipers offered rum, food and flowers at the skull-topped cross of Baron Samedi, leader of the spirits that rule Haiti's Day of the Dead. Christians held candles in one hand and trowels in the other, offering blessings and promising repairs for hundreds of desecrated tombs, the work of impoverished grave robbers, that stand as silent and grim testimony to Haiti's prolonged despair.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 3, 1995 | LUCILLE RENWICK, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Papa Legba, open the gate / Open the gate / To let us come in. * In a Vodou ceremony, the deity Legba serves as the gatekeeper, barring anyone from connecting to other spirits in the immortal world without first going through him. In UCLA's "Sacred Arts of Haitian Vodou," the dozen featured artists are gatekeepers themselves, with their art opening doors to an enigmatic religion often misconstrued to mean zombies, pins stuck in dolls and other kinds of black magic.
NEWS
November 2, 1994 | MARK FINEMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
As Haiti mourned its dead Tuesday in the heart of Port-au-Prince's main cemetery, voodoo worshipers offered rum, food and flowers at the skull-topped cross of Baron Samedi, leader of the spirits that rule Haiti's Day of the Dead. Christians held candles in one hand and trowels in the other, offering blessings and promising repairs for hundreds of desecrated tombs, the work of impoverished grave robbers, that stand as silent and grim testimony to Haiti's prolonged despair.
NEWS
October 18, 1994 | TRACY WILKINSON and KENNETH FREED, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Proof that Haiti remains extremely volatile was in evidence Monday as friendly but unruly crowds mobbed the car carrying President Jean-Bertrand Aristide and then hurled stones and insults at Haiti's senior military officer, whose family home was torched.
NEWS
October 16, 1994 | From Associated Press
The Security Council welcomed the return of President Jean-Bertrand Aristide to Haiti on Saturday by lifting its crippling sanctions against the Caribbean nation. The vote was 14 in favor with one abstention, Brazil. "Our hopes and our prayers are with the people of Haiti as they begin to rebuild their country," U.S. Ambassador Madeleine Albright told the council. "To the people of Haiti we say: We are with you and we will help you."
NEWS
October 16, 1994
The return to Haiti of President Jean-Bertrand Aristide inspired expressions of joy, gratitude and hope. "The 15th of October. What a beautiful day this is . . . a day to celebrate, a day of deliverance, a day of nonviolence." --Jean-Bertrand Aristide, arriving at the Haitian airport in Port-au-Prince after three years of exile * "His message of no vengeance, no violence, is the right thing to heal Haiti, attract investment and create jobs to break the cycle of poverty." --The Rev.
NEWS
November 19, 1991 | KENNETH FREED, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Haitian army gave a parade Monday and nobody came. The occasion was the annual celebration of Haiti's defeat of French forces at the battle of Vertieres in 1803, when the onetime slave colony sealed its bid for independence. But instead of celebrating the historic victory over Napoleon's army, the Haitian people turned their backs on the military, some literally.
NEWS
February 8, 1991 | DON A. SCHANCHE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Father Jean Bertrand Aristide, a slum priest who became Haiti's first democratically elected president, was sworn into office Thursday. He immediately announced a wholesale reorganization of the once-dominant army that has been blamed for most of the impoverished country's violence and bloodshed in recent years.
WORLD
January 6, 2004 | Carol J. Williams, Times Staff Writer
An opposition alliance trying to force President Jean-Bertrand Aristide to resign announced a new wave of protests -- including a two-day nationwide strike -- to show the depth of popular disenchantment with the once-beloved leader. Monday's appeal for an intensified campaign of civil disobedience follows violent clashes with police and pro-Aristide gangs during Haiti's bicentennial celebrations on New Year's Day.
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