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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 2, 1996 | BOB POOL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Mess up this story and you'll pay, an inner voice warned. Someone will be laying on a curse, conjuring up an evil spirit. Poking pins in a reporter doll. After all, who suffers if you pooh-pooh voodoo? You do. Anyone who has ever seen a zombie movie knows that. So maybe it was a mistake to paraphrase singer Keely Smith the other day when Westwood's top voodoo expert stuck out his hand and introduced himself. "So, how long has 'That Old Black Magic' had you in its spell?" Donald J.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 4, 1996 | BOB POOL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Mess up this story and you'll pay, an inner voice warned. Someone will be laying on a curse, conjuring up an evil spirit. Poking pins in a reporter doll. After all, who suffers if you pooh-pooh voodoo? You do. Anyone who has ever seen a zombie movie knows that. So maybe it was a mistake to paraphrase singer Keely Smith the other day when Westwood's top voodoo expert stuck out his hand and introduced himself. "So, how long has 'That Old Black Magic' had you in its spell?" Donald J.
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NEWS
November 30, 1994 | MARK FINEMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
As the celebrations of this nation's new democracy swirled around the Croix des Bossales market where she had sold drinking water for years by the glass, Rita Jean-Gilles was too weak to stand, let alone march. Her chest hurt. Her feet were swollen. She had survived years of crushing poverty, military oppression and an illness she still denies.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 2, 1996 | BOB POOL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Mess up this story and you'll pay, an inner voice warned. Someone will be laying on a curse, conjuring up an evil spirit. Poking pins in a reporter doll. After all, who suffers if you pooh-pooh voodoo? You do. Anyone who has ever seen a zombie movie knows that. So maybe it was a mistake to paraphrase singer Keely Smith the other day when Westwood's top voodoo expert stuck out his hand and introduced himself. "So, how long has 'That Old Black Magic' had you in its spell?" Donald J.
NEWS
September 29, 1992 | KENNETH FREED, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The English novelist E. M. Forster once wrote that the very poor "are unthinkable, and only to be approached by the statistician or the poet." Forster never saw Haiti. For here in this lost land of skeletal children, a land purged of nearly all human values, the very poor are everywhere, spectral forms, some with just enough strength to hold out their hands for alms, many with dead eyes void of even the hope of charity. These are faces too horrifying for even the words of poets.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 4, 1996 | BOB POOL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Mess up this story and you'll pay, an inner voice warned. Someone will be laying on a curse, conjuring up an evil spirit. Poking pins in a reporter doll. After all, who suffers if you pooh-pooh voodoo? You do. Anyone who has ever seen a zombie movie knows that. So maybe it was a mistake to paraphrase singer Keely Smith the other day when Westwood's top voodoo expert stuck out his hand and introduced himself. "So, how long has 'That Old Black Magic' had you in its spell?" Donald J.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 3, 1988 | PATRICK GOLDSTEIN
When Wade Davis was in the Amazon, he got lost for 10 days in the jungle. When he went to Haiti, he met a zombie and watched a voodoo priest dig up a dead child and cook its bones as part of the recipe for a deadly poison. So it hardly seemed like a big deal when a pair of woolly monkeys gave the 34-year-old ethnobotanist and author an odd stare as he strolled around the Los Angeles Zoo the other day. They had good reason to be suspicious.
NEWS
May 29, 1989 | DON A. SCHANCHE, Times Staff Writer
A dramatic increase in heterosexually transmitted AIDS in Haiti and other Caribbean islands has alarmed specialists and researchers, who say they fear that a lethal wave of infection--like the epidemic that has swept a number of African countries--will soon engulf this region. "The potential exists for a massive epidemic propagated mostly by heterosexual transmission," said Dr. Thomas C. Quinn of the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases at Bethesda, Md. Quinn is co-author of a new study describing the ominous trend in the Caribbean basin and parts of Latin America.
NEWS
October 15, 1994 | TRACY WILKINSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The brother of slain Justice Minister Guy Malary trembled as he stood in the pulpit of Sacre Coeur Church on Friday, his hands raised before a solemn audience that included some of exiled President Jean-Bertrand Aristide's most high-profile supporters. "Is it justice," he cried, "when they kill our people and then they are allowed to leave the country? "Is that justice?" he asked, referring to the lucrative, U.S.-sponsored departure of Haiti's military dictators.
NEWS
November 30, 1994 | MARK FINEMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
As the celebrations of this nation's new democracy swirled around the Croix des Bossales market where she had sold drinking water for years by the glass, Rita Jean-Gilles was too weak to stand, let alone march. Her chest hurt. Her feet were swollen. She had survived years of crushing poverty, military oppression and an illness she still denies.
NEWS
September 29, 1992 | KENNETH FREED, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The English novelist E. M. Forster once wrote that the very poor "are unthinkable, and only to be approached by the statistician or the poet." Forster never saw Haiti. For here in this lost land of skeletal children, a land purged of nearly all human values, the very poor are everywhere, spectral forms, some with just enough strength to hold out their hands for alms, many with dead eyes void of even the hope of charity. These are faces too horrifying for even the words of poets.
NEWS
May 29, 1989 | DON A. SCHANCHE, Times Staff Writer
A dramatic increase in heterosexually transmitted AIDS in Haiti and other Caribbean islands has alarmed specialists and researchers, who say they fear that a lethal wave of infection--like the epidemic that has swept a number of African countries--will soon engulf this region. "The potential exists for a massive epidemic propagated mostly by heterosexual transmission," said Dr. Thomas C. Quinn of the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases at Bethesda, Md. Quinn is co-author of a new study describing the ominous trend in the Caribbean basin and parts of Latin America.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 3, 1988 | PATRICK GOLDSTEIN
When Wade Davis was in the Amazon, he got lost for 10 days in the jungle. When he went to Haiti, he met a zombie and watched a voodoo priest dig up a dead child and cook its bones as part of the recipe for a deadly poison. So it hardly seemed like a big deal when a pair of woolly monkeys gave the 34-year-old ethnobotanist and author an odd stare as he strolled around the Los Angeles Zoo the other day. They had good reason to be suspicious.
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