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NEWS
January 18, 1993 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
A U.N. envoy said that the army and military-backed government have agreed to allow international civilian observers in Haiti, a move that may ease the refugee crisis and help usher in a return to democracy. The envoy, Dante Caputo, said he hopes the force can be in place by week's end. He characterized the agreement as the first step toward ending army repression since soldiers toppled elected President Jean-Bertrand Aristide in September, 1991.
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WORLD
April 1, 2010 | By Paul Richter
U.S. officials on Wednesday pledged $1.2 billion to rebuild Haiti under an ambitious but controversial plan that would hand the country's government -- long considered corrupt and ineffective -- broad, new control over how to spend the foreign aid money. Secretary of State Hillary Rodham Clinton announced the two-year U.S. pledge at a donors conference at the United Nations, declaring that world powers "cannot retreat to failed strategies" of working around the Haitian government.
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NEWS
January 14, 1992 | KENNETH FREED, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In an act full of unintended irony and defiance, the puppet civilian government here said Monday that it would not go gently from office and called for the defeat of a compromise solution to the Haitian political and economic crisis. Speaking to the opening session of Haiti's National Assembly, Joseph Nerette, the provisional president imposed by the army after the Sept.
WORLD
March 27, 2004 | From Times Wire Reports
The 15-nation Caribbean Community, meeting in Basseterre, St. Kitts, has decided against recognizing Haiti's new U.S.-backed government, senior officials said. They cited concerns over the manner in which ousted President Jean-Bertrand Aristide went into exile. The Haitian government announced that it would block dozens of members of Aristide's administration from leaving the country while it investigates crime allegations. And 2,000 tons of U.N. food aid arrived at Cap Haitien.
NEWS
February 6, 1987
Haiti's government announced strict new security measures that critics said signaled the beginning of a new dictatorship. A government communique said that police will intervene without warrants when a suspect is caught in terrorist or seditious acts.
NEWS
January 23, 1990 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Haiti's military government continued its crackdown on dissent with police raids that halted newscasts of three independent radio stations in the northern port of Cap-Haitien, a witness said. The witness, an employee of Radio Citadelle, said that armed plainclothes officers burst into the station shortly after a newscast that reported on weekend arrests, beatings and the exile of political activists. He said that similar raids occurred at Radio Voix du Nord and Radio Cap-Haitien.
NEWS
March 26, 1999 | From Associated Press
President Rene Preval appointed a new government by decree Thursday in an attempt to end nearly two years of crisis and regain the confidence of the international community. Haiti's new government, packed with Preval allies, was immediately criticized by his political opponents. Yet it probably will be welcomed by Haiti's business sector and an international community frustrated by Haiti's prolonged political stalemate.
NEWS
November 9, 1991 | Times Wire Services
The provisional government issued an arrest order for ousted President Jean-Bertrand Aristide, state radio reported Friday, ahead of talks with foreign governments that want him reinstated. It also ordered the arrest of four other men, including Aristide's prime minister. State television said the men are wanted in an investigation of the death of a prominent Aristide critic and the arrest and alleged torture of a navy officer's wife.
NEWS
January 9, 1988 | DAN WILLIAMS, Times Staff Writer
Despite evidence that the military-dominated government of Haiti sabotaged one attempt at free presidential elections and is hoping to fix the next one, the Reagan Administration is prepared to live with the results of the vote scheduled for next weekend, U.S. officials say.
NEWS
September 2, 2000 | ESTHER SCHRADER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Clinton administration will warn Haiti's government next week that it risks losing tens of millions of dollars in U.S. aid unless it voids the results of widely condemned elections, a State Department official said Friday. The balloting in May and July gave the party of former President Jean-Bertrand Aristide sweeping victories in both houses of Haiti's reconstituted Parliament. But U.S.
NEWS
July 9, 2001 | MARK FINEMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
It was just over a year ago that a peasant mob in this poor coastal town ripped off a 4-ton shipment of Colombian cocaine--a haul worth $20 million even at local prices. Fishermen became instant millionaires. Farmers showered in celebratory beers at local nightclubs. And the sudden largess spawned a host of new social ills. But the populist drug seizure here in a nation that had become a major transshipment hub for Colombian cocaine headed to the U.S.
NEWS
March 21, 2001 | From Times Wire Reports
Supporters of President Jean-Bertrand Aristide shot at a school run by Haiti's opposition leader and lobbed firebombs at an opposition office, raising the stakes in a standoff between the government and its foes. At least four people were reported wounded. Police fired tear gas to disperse the mob outside the school run by Gerard Gourgue, leader of the 15-party opposition alliance called Democratic Convergence.
NEWS
February 8, 2001 | MARK FINEMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
To shouts of "50 more years," Jean-Bertrand Aristide took back Haiti's presidential sash Wednesday, reclaiming the helm of a nation more isolated, divided and impoverished than when he left office five years ago. Beaming with apparent relief, outgoing President Rene Preval embraced his mentor after handing back the blue-and-red mantle of Haitian power at a Legislative Palace bristling with machine guns, security guards and combat gear.
NEWS
November 28, 2000 | MARK FINEMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Emerging after five years of virtual seclusion and a weekend election that almost certainly will return him to power, former President Jean-Bertrand Aristide on Monday reached out to an embittered opposition and a doubting international community with an appeal for peace and reconciliation in his isolated and violent land.
NEWS
November 27, 2000 | MARK FINEMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Jean-Bertrand Aristide and Chavannes Jean-Baptiste once called each other brothers. They marched barefoot side by side across miles of razor-edged rock to protest Haiti's military rulers. Together, more than a decade ago, they built the massive, populist Lavalas Family movement that helped drive out Haiti's brutal dictators and bring Aristide to power.
NEWS
September 6, 2000 | From Times Wire Reports
The Clinton administration vowed to impose economic sanctions against Haiti unless it strengthens democratic procedures in advance of presidential and legislative elections set for Nov. 26. The warning was issued by Luis Lauredo, U.S. ambassador to the Organization of American States, at an OAS permanent council meeting on OAS efforts to help build democracy in Haiti.
NEWS
September 2, 2000 | ESTHER SCHRADER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Clinton administration will warn Haiti's government next week that it risks losing tens of millions of dollars in U.S. aid unless it voids the results of widely condemned elections, a State Department official said Friday. The balloting in May and July gave the party of former President Jean-Bertrand Aristide sweeping victories in both houses of Haiti's reconstituted Parliament. But U.S.
NEWS
July 25, 2000 | MARK FINEMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
For two days last month, they hunted the frail old man. Seat by seat, the police searched every commercial jet leaving Port-au-Prince's airport for the United States. They tore through cars crossing the remote Dominican border and pored over surveillance tapes from cameras outside diplomatic compounds here. They wanted Leon Manus at all costs--and, by his and most others' reckoning, they wanted him dead.
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