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Haiti Religion

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February 3, 1988 | PATRICK GOLDSTEIN
When Wade Davis was in the Amazon, he got lost for 10 days in the jungle. When he went to Haiti, he met a zombie and watched a voodoo priest dig up a dead child and cook its bones as part of the recipe for a deadly poison. So it hardly seemed like a big deal when a pair of woolly monkeys gave the 34-year-old ethnobotanist and author an odd stare as he strolled around the Los Angeles Zoo the other day. They had good reason to be suspicious.
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ENTERTAINMENT
February 3, 1988 | PATRICK GOLDSTEIN
When Wade Davis was in the Amazon, he got lost for 10 days in the jungle. When he went to Haiti, he met a zombie and watched a voodoo priest dig up a dead child and cook its bones as part of the recipe for a deadly poison. So it hardly seemed like a big deal when a pair of woolly monkeys gave the 34-year-old ethnobotanist and author an odd stare as he strolled around the Los Angeles Zoo the other day. They had good reason to be suspicious.
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ENTERTAINMENT
January 1, 1995 | Suzanne Muchnic, Suzanne Muchnic is The Times' art writer
London art dealer Cyril Humphris is one of the art world's most enduring behind-the-scenes players. For the past 30 years or so he has advised leading collectors of European sculpture and helped to build the holdings of the Arthur M. Sackler Gallery in Washington, the Mellon Center at Yale University, the J. Paul Getty Museum in Malibu and the Huntington Library, Art Galleries and Botanical Gardens in San Marino.
NEWS
June 6, 2004 | Paisley Dodds, Associated Press Writer
Named after a sacred tree in the voodoo religion, this Haitian village has few remaining mapou trees and a scant number of others on its surrounding mountains. When floods tore through town last month, many survived by clinging to roots, branches and trunks -- but it was the overall absence of trees that made the onslaught so deadly. At least 1,700 people died, half in the area around Mapou. "We know we need trees, but we also need to eat and to cook," said Philis Milfort, 87.
NEWS
March 7, 1986 | DAN WILLIAMS, Times Staff Writer
A few days after the ouster of President Jean-Claude Duvalier, a mob looted the home of a voodoo priestess here, shattered bottles of herbal medicine, tore apart her altars and stripped the house to bare plaster. On a wall outside, across the street from a mural depicting the blood sacrifice of a goat, vandals scrawled the message: "Down With Voodoo. Free the Zombies."
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