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NEWS
June 2, 1992 | From Associated Press
Police arrested four students and a radio reporter Monday as anti-government demonstrations resumed in public high schools in the Haitian capital. Schools reopened Monday after being closed last week because of protests demanding the return of Jean Bertrand Aristide, the elected president who was toppled in a bloody military coup last September. Three girls were arrested at one school where plainclothes police officers scaled the wall and jumped into the courtyard.
ARTICLES BY DATE
WORLD
February 2, 2010 | By Mitchell Landsberg
David Saill is 10 years old, and he came to school Monday in a freshly ironed shirt and baggy black slacks to reclaim a piece of his lost life. He couldn't have it all back. Not his home, which collapsed in the Jan. 12 earthquake. Not his very best friend, Laguer, who died when his own house fell on him. Not the sense of security he felt before he knew that the earth could shake apart his known universe. But school -- that he could have back. Or so he was told. Monday was the first day that schools in Haiti could reopen after the earthquake, which was centered near the capital, Port-au-Prince.
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WORLD
November 9, 2008 | Associated Press
Rescuers pulled four children alive Saturday from the rubble of a three-story school that collapsed on hundreds of students and teachers, killing at least 88 people. Emergency workers cradled the dazed children in their arms and rushed them into ambulances, U.N. police spokesman Andre Leclerc said. The extent of the injuries to the two girls, ages 3 and 5, and two boys, a 7-year-old and a teenager, was unknown, Leclerc said.
WORLD
November 9, 2008 | Associated Press
Rescuers pulled four children alive Saturday from the rubble of a three-story school that collapsed on hundreds of students and teachers, killing at least 88 people. Emergency workers cradled the dazed children in their arms and rushed them into ambulances, U.N. police spokesman Andre Leclerc said. The extent of the injuries to the two girls, ages 3 and 5, and two boys, a 7-year-old and a teenager, was unknown, Leclerc said.
WORLD
February 2, 2010 | By Mitchell Landsberg
David Saill is 10 years old, and he came to school Monday in a freshly ironed shirt and baggy black slacks to reclaim a piece of his lost life. He couldn't have it all back. Not his home, which collapsed in the Jan. 12 earthquake. Not his very best friend, Laguer, who died when his own house fell on him. Not the sense of security he felt before he knew that the earth could shake apart his known universe. But school -- that he could have back. Or so he was told. Monday was the first day that schools in Haiti could reopen after the earthquake, which was centered near the capital, Port-au-Prince.
NEWS
January 9, 1986
Haiti closed schools and warned that troops will crush all demonstrations in an attempt to halt a wave of violence that has claimed at least five lives since Nov. 28. Thousands of students have boycotted classes to protest poor living conditions and a July 22 referendum that increased the power of Jean-Claude Duvalier, self-appointed president for life.
OPINION
August 6, 2007
Re "Haiti debates having a homegrown army," July 30 The Haitian army was not homegrown. It was formed by an act of the U.S. Congress. Its most memorable officers were only distinguished by their bloody history of disenfranchising and suppressing the interests of Haiti's masses on behalf of the economic elite they protected and the U.S. interests they were created to secure.
WORLD
March 19, 2005 | From Associated Press
World donors approved $1 billion in aid projects for Haiti on Friday, promising to repair its roads and rebuild its battered power grid in an effort to help the Western Hemisphere's poorest nation as it prepares for fall elections. A meeting here in French Guiana's capital confirmed pledges made last summer, but diplomats attending the one-day summit said that assigning specific projects to each contributing nation would increase accountability.
WORLD
November 1, 2004 | Carol J. Williams, Times Staff Writer
Outside the rusted gates of a boys elementary school, Acelin Lazarre peddles pencils, notebooks and lunch boxes. When the streets are quiet, she can earn 25 to 30 gourdes, less than a dollar but enough to save school fees for her daughter and buy their single daily meal of rice or macaroni.
NEWS
February 22, 1986 | DAN WILLIAMS, Times Staff Writer
The people of Haiti are enjoying what what they call a second independence, taking part in long-forbidden activities like going on strike and calling public meetings. They joke about Jean-Claude Duvalier, the president-for-life who has been driven into exile, and about the Tontons Macoutes, the Duvalier thugs who terrorized them for years. They inquire about what kept the eternal flame burning across from the Presidential Palace, a flame that has gone out.
NEWS
June 2, 1992 | From Associated Press
Police arrested four students and a radio reporter Monday as anti-government demonstrations resumed in public high schools in the Haitian capital. Schools reopened Monday after being closed last week because of protests demanding the return of Jean Bertrand Aristide, the elected president who was toppled in a bloody military coup last September. Three girls were arrested at one school where plainclothes police officers scaled the wall and jumped into the courtyard.
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