Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsHaitian Army
IN THE NEWS

Haitian Army

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
September 18, 1994 | From Associated Press
Terrified by the possibility of a U.S. invasion or retaliation from supporters of the ruling army, Haitians flocked to bus stations throughout the capital Saturday to flee the city. A woman carrying her year-old daughter dressed in a white Sunday dress was sprinting to catch an overcrowded bus that was pulling out. One man jumped onto the rear bumper with such force that he broke a tail light when the vehicle unexpectedly stopped.
ARTICLES BY DATE
OPINION
August 6, 2007
Re "Haiti debates having a homegrown army," July 30 The Haitian army was not homegrown. It was formed by an act of the U.S. Congress. Its most memorable officers were only distinguished by their bloody history of disenfranchising and suppressing the interests of Haiti's masses on behalf of the economic elite they protected and the U.S. interests they were created to secure.
Advertisement
NEWS
October 12, 1994 | KENNETH FREED, TIMES STAFF WRITER
For all intents and purposes, Haiti's army, an instrument of corruption and repression by tyrants and dictators across nearly two centuries, no longer exists, according to U.S. officials and military officers. "It died yesterday. It is a corpse, it just hasn't been buried yet. That comes Saturday," said a senior U.S. army officer. He spoke of the resignation Monday of former Commander in Chief Lt. Gen. Raoul Cedras and his chief aide, Brig. Gen.
WORLD
December 19, 2004 | Carol J. Williams, Times Staff Writer
In a move applying both force and appeasement, officials of the embattled interim government said Saturday that they had ended an armed standoff with soldiers of the disbanded Haitian army by promising them back wages and jobs in exchange for their weapons. Although more radical elements of the demobilized army remained at large, both the government of interim Prime Minister Gerard Latortue and a U.N.
OPINION
August 6, 2007
Re "Haiti debates having a homegrown army," July 30 The Haitian army was not homegrown. It was formed by an act of the U.S. Congress. Its most memorable officers were only distinguished by their bloody history of disenfranchising and suppressing the interests of Haiti's masses on behalf of the economic elite they protected and the U.S. interests they were created to secure.
NEWS
September 24, 1993 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
The U.N. Security Council voted to send 1,267 police and military advisers, including about 500 uniformed Americans, to help stabilize Haiti as it awaits the return Oct. 30 of ousted President Jean-Bertrand Aristide. The action follows a series of bloody attacks on Aristide supporters by gunmen backing the military regime, threatening the U.N.-sponsored effort to restore Aristide to power. Most of the U.S.
NEWS
August 1, 1994 | From Associated Press
Some Haitians welcomed the U.N. approval Sunday of the use of force to topple their military government, saying that freedom is worth any sacrifice. Others predicted a disaster. "I'm afraid Haiti is going to become a new Somalia," said Antoine Joseph, a former president of the lower house of Parliament. A multinational peacekeeping force has failed to curb clan fighting in Somalia. The U.N.
NEWS
September 22, 1993 | NORMAN KEMPSTER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Jean-Bertrand Aristide, the exiled priest who is scheduled to reclaim Haiti's presidency in less than six weeks, called on the United Nations on Tuesday to reimpose economic sanctions until Haitian army chief Raoul Cedras and other military "killers" relinquish power and leave the island.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 17, 1993
Rep. Robert G. Torricelli's appeal for an amnesty of the mass murderers in the Haitian army (Commentary, May 6) elevates defeatism to a virtue. International law and basic decency require that governments prosecute those responsible for state-sponsored murder and torture. Yet he argues that an amnesty for these crimes is necessary in Haiti because of Latin America's mixed record of bringing gross abusers to justice over the past decade. What Torricelli ignores is the U.S. contribution to this impunity.
NEWS
April 14, 1993 | NORMAN KEMPSTER and ART PINE, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Deposed Haitian President Jean-Bertrand Aristide has agreed to a delicate formula that would restore him to office in exchange for amnesty for the coup leaders who ousted him 19 months ago, a source close to the former president said Tuesday. The new package was carried to Haiti by U.N. special envoy Dante Caputo, who has been working for months to cobble together an agreement that would restore democracy to the troubled Caribbean island nation.
WORLD
October 29, 2004 | Carol J. Williams, Times Staff Writer
In crisp new camouflage uniforms, automatic rifles at the ready, militia members from the disbanded Haitian army rumble out of their hilltop villa compound in a daily show of force to comfort the elite and intimidate armed radicals paralyzing the capital below. Five miles downhill, in the most desperate neighborhoods of Port-au-Prince, the army of the slums trains its own weapons and anger on government and commerce. For three weeks the gunmen have been sniping at port workers, police and U.N.
NEWS
February 11, 2000
Former Haitian Gen. Claude Raymond, 69, the once-dreaded chief of ousted dictator Jean-Claude Duvalier's army. Raymond became Duvalier's chief of staff and interior minister when the dictator succeeded his father, Francois "Papa Doc" Duvalier, who died in 1971 after 14 years of repressive rule. Raymond, who had been a bodyguard and army chief to the senior Duvalier, retired shortly thereafter. After the younger Duvalier was ousted in 1986, Raymond declared himself a candidate for the presidency.
NEWS
January 8, 1995 | From Reuters
The headquarters of Haiti's military--the once-feared symbol of tyranny in the Caribbean nation--is to be turned into the offices for the recently created Ministry for Women's Affairs, a presidential decree issued Saturday said. The decree provides a home for the women's ministry that has been without a base since its inception in November. It was unclear when Minister Lyse-Marie Dejean will move into her new office or where the new seat of the army will be.
NEWS
October 12, 1994 | KENNETH FREED, TIMES STAFF WRITER
For all intents and purposes, Haiti's army, an instrument of corruption and repression by tyrants and dictators across nearly two centuries, no longer exists, according to U.S. officials and military officers. "It died yesterday. It is a corpse, it just hasn't been buried yet. That comes Saturday," said a senior U.S. army officer. He spoke of the resignation Monday of former Commander in Chief Lt. Gen. Raoul Cedras and his chief aide, Brig. Gen.
NEWS
September 18, 1994 | From Associated Press
Terrified by the possibility of a U.S. invasion or retaliation from supporters of the ruling army, Haitians flocked to bus stations throughout the capital Saturday to flee the city. A woman carrying her year-old daughter dressed in a white Sunday dress was sprinting to catch an overcrowded bus that was pulling out. One man jumped onto the rear bumper with such force that he broke a tail light when the vehicle unexpectedly stopped.
NEWS
August 1, 1994 | From Associated Press
Some Haitians welcomed the U.N. approval Sunday of the use of force to topple their military government, saying that freedom is worth any sacrifice. Others predicted a disaster. "I'm afraid Haiti is going to become a new Somalia," said Antoine Joseph, a former president of the lower house of Parliament. A multinational peacekeeping force has failed to curb clan fighting in Somalia. The U.N.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 11, 1987
I salute your editorial condemning the brutal sabotage of the Haitian elections ("Sabotaging Democracy," Dec. 1). However, while you are correct in laying the blame at the doorstep of the military junta, you have made the mistake of chastising the tenant and letting the landlord go free. There can be no doubt that the massacre of voters on that bloody Sunday is the fault of the policies of the United States. The United States invaded Haiti in 1915, ostensibly to restore order in a time of political turmoil.
WORLD
December 19, 2004 | Carol J. Williams, Times Staff Writer
In a move applying both force and appeasement, officials of the embattled interim government said Saturday that they had ended an armed standoff with soldiers of the disbanded Haitian army by promising them back wages and jobs in exchange for their weapons. Although more radical elements of the demobilized army remained at large, both the government of interim Prime Minister Gerard Latortue and a U.N.
NEWS
July 27, 1994 | KENNETH FREED, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Haitian military, satisfied it has faced down the threat of U.S. military intervention, now expects to maneuver the United States into easing its punishing economic sanctions while keeping President Jean-Bertrand Aristide in exile, Haitian army and political sources say.
NEWS
September 24, 1993 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
The U.N. Security Council voted to send 1,267 police and military advisers, including about 500 uniformed Americans, to help stabilize Haiti as it awaits the return Oct. 30 of ousted President Jean-Bertrand Aristide. The action follows a series of bloody attacks on Aristide supporters by gunmen backing the military regime, threatening the U.N.-sponsored effort to restore Aristide to power. Most of the U.S.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|