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WORLD
April 24, 2011 | By Allyn Gaestel, Los Angeles Times
Dumped in a squalid holding cell and then shunned by a society he doesn't know, Patrick Escarment struggles to learn Creole and build a life in earthquake-devastated Haiti. His arrival here this year was not voluntary. Escarment was in the first group of Haitians with criminal records to be deported from the United States to Haiti after a one-year moratorium. After the Jan. 12, 2010, earthquake that destroyed most of this capital and killed more than 300,000 people, the Obama administration suspended deportations.
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ENTERTAINMENT
December 28, 2012 | By Hector Tobar, Los Angeles Times
Farewell, Fred Voodoo A Letter from Haiti Amy Wilentz Simon & Schuster: 352 pp., $27 When an earthquake struck Haiti in 2010, killing thousands, Amy Wilentz tried to stay away. This wasn't easy for her to do. The Haitian people, their language and the unique beauty and madness of their country have been her obsession for a quarter-century. Indeed Wilentz, a Los Angeles writer and award-winning journalist, knows Haiti as well as any American writer has known a country that's not her own. Wilentz, author of the acclaimed book "The Rainy Season," didn't go to Haiti because she couldn't stand the idea of seeing that country of proud dreamers treated as just another group of pathetic disaster victims.
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WORLD
January 21, 2010 | By Tracy Wilkinson
Gregory Mevs leaped from his armored silver Toyota SUV and marched past the guards and mango trees into what serves these days as the center of the Haitian government. He was ready to dispense a million gallons of fuel to the earthquake-ravaged capital. But the paperwork was not in order. He needed the Haitian prime minister's signature. Ten minutes later, he had it. Mevs can do that. He has the prime minister's ear. He hobnobs with people like Bill Clinton, George Soros and the chief executives of the world's largest corporations.
WORLD
July 24, 2011 | By Allyn Gaestel, Los Angeles Times
Instead of the commuters typically packed into the bright blue and red "tap tap" pickup truck weaving through Haiti's capital, a man, shrunken, dehydrated, dressed in a diaper and attached to an IV, lay on the floor. As the ad-hoc ambulance in Port-au-Prince attested, cholera refuses to leave the country. The bacterial disease that ravaged Haiti last fall had spread quickly to all regions, but calmed down in the dry spring months. With the rainy season now in progress, clinics across the country are again bustling with seriously ill patients.
NEWS
February 25, 1986 | DAN WILLIAMS, Times Staff Writer
A former police chief of Port-au-Prince who headed a military unit known for its use of torture has left for exile in Brazil with the permission of the new government of Haiti. The flight of Col. Albert Pierre indicates that the ruling National Council that succeeded ex-President Jean-Claude Duvalier is shying away from prosecuting deposed officials for human rights abuses. Three of the five members of the National Council are armed forces officers.
NEWS
December 2, 1987 | From Times Wire Services
The State Department called on the Haitian government Tuesday to take "dramatic and credible steps" aimed at punishing those responsible for the terror campaign that led to the postponement of national elections Sunday. Department spokesman Charles Redman renewed the U.S. call for a restoration of democratic processes in Haiti, and he held out the possibility that the Organization of American States may issue a similar appeal.
NEWS
September 19, 1988 | Associated Press
The United States anticipates difficulty in dealing with the new government of Haiti if its army is to be headed by a colonel facing a drug indictment in Florida, the White House said today. Frantz Lubin, Haiti's director of information, said in Port-au-Prince over the weekend that Jean-Claude Paul, commander of the Dessalines barracks, was assuming command of the army. However, Gen. Prosper Avril, in announcing Sunday that he is assuming the presidency, did not mention Paul.
NEWS
April 14, 1993 | ART PINE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Clinton Administration is considering sending a small contingent of U.S. troops to Haiti, mainly to help with reconstruction efforts, if the United Nations succeeds in brokering a settlement this week that would restore democracy to that strife-torn nation. The plan, described by senior U.S. officials, was disclosed as U.N.
WORLD
January 27, 2010 | By Scott Kraft
Farrah Leolo, a 9-year-old with a charming smile, was dressed for an important journey. Her hair was braided and she wore a crisp white blouse and pink slacks. In her pocket, she had cookies and passport-sized photos. A few minutes after Farrah left the Horizon of Hope child-care center with French Embassy officials this week, her adoptive mother called the center's owner, Kathelen Douyon, from Paris. "She looked so beautiful," Douyon told the mother. Then, choking back tears, she silently handed the phone to an aide and put her face in her hands.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 3, 1987 | BRIAN ATWOOD, Brian Atwood is the president of the National Democratic Institute for International Affairs in Washington.
Policy-makers around the hemisphere are this week considering their options for dealing with a military government in Haiti that has sabotaged an election fervently desired by its own people. The policy alternatives can become clear only after a realistic analysis of what caused this aborted election. I was the co-leader, with former Prime Minister George C.
WORLD
April 24, 2011 | By Allyn Gaestel, Los Angeles Times
Dumped in a squalid holding cell and then shunned by a society he doesn't know, Patrick Escarment struggles to learn Creole and build a life in earthquake-devastated Haiti. His arrival here this year was not voluntary. Escarment was in the first group of Haitians with criminal records to be deported from the United States to Haiti after a one-year moratorium. After the Jan. 12, 2010, earthquake that destroyed most of this capital and killed more than 300,000 people, the Obama administration suspended deportations.
WORLD
January 20, 2011 | By Tracy Wilkinson, Los Angeles Times
There are as many theories about why Jean-Claude Duvalier returned to Haiti as there are cracks in the crumpled walls of the presidential palace. Did the doddering dictator come home to die? Or is a still-wily Baby Doc here in a scheme to recover millions of looted dollars? Or is he a pawn in a ploy to upend an unresolved political process ? and to the favor of whom? Duvalier himself has uttered only a few words publicly since he stunned the world by returning to Haiti on Sunday, ending a quarter of a century in exile in France.
OPINION
January 16, 2011 | By Amy Wilentz
Here's what's wrong with Haiti right now: A year after an earthquake ripped through the capital and nearby towns like an atomic bomb, killing an estimated 300,000 people, the Haitian government is wasting its limited energies politicking rather than working on a serious recovery plan. Pushed by an international community that wants to know what government it will be dealing with as promised foreign recovery monies come into the country, Haitian officials have fallen into a vortex of farcical horse-trading to determine who will next take hold of this bucking and plunging country and try to ride it into the future.
OPINION
November 23, 2010 | By Dan Beeton
Haiti is scheduled to hold elections on Nov. 28, and nothing ? neither the cholera outbreak that has killed more than 1,000 people nor the fact that more than 1 million earthquake survivors remain homeless ? seems likely to convince the Haitian government or its international backers that the vote should be postponed. It should be. Why? The electoral process is rigged. Unfortunately, the Obama administration seems happy to go along with the charade. Earlier this month President Obama rightly condemned the bogus elections in Burma (renamed Myanmar by the military regime)
OPINION
July 19, 2010
Six months after Haiti was ravaged by the fifth deadliest earthquake in history (according to the U.S. Geological Survey), it's hard to find anybody involved in the reconstruction effort who isn't deeply frustrated by the lack of progress. Relief organizations rail against the Haitian government for its failure to come up with a plan for removing debris or perform other vital logistical duties; government ministers fire back that the nonprofits are confusing matters by failing to coordinate their efforts.
WORLD
April 1, 2010 | By Paul Richter
U.S. officials on Wednesday pledged $1.2 billion to rebuild Haiti under an ambitious but controversial plan that would hand the country's government -- long considered corrupt and ineffective -- broad, new control over how to spend the foreign aid money. Secretary of State Hillary Rodham Clinton announced the two-year U.S. pledge at a donors conference at the United Nations, declaring that world powers "cannot retreat to failed strategies" of working around the Haitian government.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 24, 1988 | ALEX STEPICK, Alex Stepick is an associate professor of anthropology and sociology at Florida International University in Miami
After the Haitian military brutally defeated democracy by disrupting elections last November, I suspected that Lt. Gen. Henri Namphy was a keen student of history. I predicted that the Haitian military would do as it did 30 years earlier when it arranged the election of Francois (Papa Doc) Duvalier. This time the selected candidate was Leslie Manigat, whom Namphy removed from power this past week. Namphy has proved to be an even better student of Haitian history than I had thought.
WORLD
January 20, 2011 | By Tracy Wilkinson, Los Angeles Times
There are as many theories about why Jean-Claude Duvalier returned to Haiti as there are cracks in the crumpled walls of the presidential palace. Did the doddering dictator come home to die? Or is a still-wily Baby Doc here in a scheme to recover millions of looted dollars? Or is he a pawn in a ploy to upend an unresolved political process ? and to the favor of whom? Duvalier himself has uttered only a few words publicly since he stunned the world by returning to Haiti on Sunday, ending a quarter of a century in exile in France.
WORLD
February 10, 2010 | From Reuters
A Haitian judge has decided to release 10 U.S. missionaries accused of kidnapping 33 children and trying to spirit them out of the earthquake- stricken country, a judicial source said Wednesday. The source said the missionaries, who have been in jail since they were stopped at Haiti's border with the Dominican Republic on Jan. 29, could be released as early as Thursday. "The order will be to release them," the source, who asked not to be named, told Reuters. The decision has not yet been made public.
WORLD
February 2, 2010 | By Mitchell Landsberg
David Saill is 10 years old, and he came to school Monday in a freshly ironed shirt and baggy black slacks to reclaim a piece of his lost life. He couldn't have it all back. Not his home, which collapsed in the Jan. 12 earthquake. Not his very best friend, Laguer, who died when his own house fell on him. Not the sense of security he felt before he knew that the earth could shake apart his known universe. But school -- that he could have back. Or so he was told. Monday was the first day that schools in Haiti could reopen after the earthquake, which was centered near the capital, Port-au-Prince.
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