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Haitian People

CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 25, 2002 | GARIOT LOUIMA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Rony St. Urbain and his family drive 45 minutes from Chatsworth to Eagle Rock three times a week to attend French-speaking Jehovah's Witnesses services. St. Urbain and 10,000 other Haitian immigrants in Los Angeles are used to traveling long distances to get together. Tired of being associated with so-called boat people and the practice of voodoo, many Haitians in Southern California have resisted attempts to organize as a community, choosing instead to blend in across the region.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 20, 1995 | MARC LITCHMAN, Marc Litchman is a political consultant and former San Fernando Valley aide to Assemblyman Richard Katz (D-Sylmar) and Rep. Howard Berman (D-Panorama City)
I knew little about the immense problems Haiti faced when I left in January to work on a USAID project run by the Office of Transition Initiatives. It was designed to help Haiti make the transition from political and economic disaster to democracy. The history of government in Haiti is one of corruption, extortion and violence. I was part of an international group, whose job after U.S.
NEWS
June 28, 1995 | KENNETH FREED, TIMES STAFF WRITER
President Jean-Bertrand Aristide said Tuesday that while he regretted problems with Haiti's parliamentary and municipal elections, there was no fraud and the vote was "a major step toward democracy." Speaking against a background of continuing complaints about electoral irregularities and mismanagement, Aristide told American reporters in his office that the major accomplishment of Sunday's elections was their largely peaceful nature.
NEWS
November 9, 1994 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Prime Minister Smarck Michel assumed office at a ceremony in which he played down high hopes and asked for the patience of his long-suffering countrymen. "I want to thank the Haitian people for their patience, and I hope I do not disappoint them," Michel said in a brief speech. Michel was appointed by President Jean-Bertrand Aristide after he was restored to power last month with the backing of the U.S. military.
OPINION
September 25, 1994 | Amy Wilentz, Amy Wilentz is the author of "The Rainy Season: Haiti Since Duvalier" (Simon & Schuster)
There was a picture of a carnival procession, men, women and children wearing bright masks. Of a morning. . .The harsh colors gave an impression of gaiety, the drummers and trumpeters seemed about to play a lively air. Only when you came closer you saw how ugly the masks were and how the masquers surrounded a cadaver in grave-clothes; then the primitive colors went flat. . .Wherever that picture hung, I would feel Haiti close to me.
NEWS
September 20, 1994 | MIKE CLARY, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
The Little Haiti neighborhood here seemed haunted by history Monday, the people riven with mistrust. In barber shops and offices, exiles watched live satellite broadcasts of American troops pouring into their homeland and even people two generations too young for firsthand knowledge of the event recalled the last U.S. occupation of Haiti as if they had been there for each of its 19 years. "I know what happened in 1915," said Miguel Jean, 33, a security guard. "They came and then didn't leave."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 17, 1994 | NICHOLAS RICCARDI, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Dieumaitre Joachim once was beaten for a song. The 32-year-old singer, who remembers being roughed up and locked in a Haitian jail for performing at the inauguration of exiled President Jean-Bertrand Aristide, now follows events in Haiti from a continent away--in an apartment in Inglewood.
OPINION
September 4, 1994 | Amy Wilentz, Amy Wilentz is the author of "The Rainy Season: Haiti Since Duvalier" (Touchstone)
As you drive up to Jean-Rabel, on the dilapidated highway through Haiti's northwest province, it's not always easy to distinguish the emaciated people--standing motionless in their drought-devastated fields--from the sad, plucked twigs of the few trees that remain on the barren land. Haitians call this dusty, famine-ridden place the "Far West." This was Jean-Marie Vincent's parish, the place he worked in and tried to change before he was brutally murdered last Sunday in Port-au-Prince.
NEWS
August 1, 1994 | From Associated Press
Some Haitians welcomed the U.N. approval Sunday of the use of force to topple their military government, saying that freedom is worth any sacrifice. Others predicted a disaster. "I'm afraid Haiti is going to become a new Somalia," said Antoine Joseph, a former president of the lower house of Parliament. A multinational peacekeeping force has failed to curb clan fighting in Somalia. The U.N.
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