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April 17, 1993 | MIKE CLARY, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Earlier this month 51 Haitian refugees, most of them with full-blown AIDS, were flown quietly to the United States and paroled to relatives in Miami, New York and Boston after they became so sick they no longer could be treated at a dusty, barbed wire-enclosed camp at Guantanamo, Cuba, where they have been held for more than a year. Still remaining at the makeshift tent city at the U.S.
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NEWS
January 8, 1995 | KENNETH FREED, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Nearly 300 Haitians, somber and disconsolate, were forcibly returned to their country Saturday as the United States stepped up its program to clear the refugees out of their haven at the U.S. naval base at Guantanamo Bay, Cuba. The U.S. Coast Guard cutter Boutwell arrived at midmorning with 289 refugees. Some had been at Guantanamo since last summer after fleeing Haiti's poverty and political terror in makeshift and overloaded rafts.
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NEWS
January 25, 1992 | MIKE CLARY, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Hours after 1,072 Haitian refugees were picked up at sea--a record one-day total--a Pentagon official expressed concern Friday that a new mass migration from the Caribbean island may be under way that could soon swamp a temporary tent city at the U.S. Naval Base at Guantanamo Bay, Cuba. "It'll only take a few days and we're overloaded," the official said. "Five days like this and we're in trouble." After the U.S.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 19, 1993 | From Religious News Service
The National Council of Churches and the U.S. Catholic Conference are taking the lead in resettling the 138 HIV-infected Haitians being released from the Guantanamo Navy base in Cuba. The Haitian refugees have been held at Guantanamo since early in 1992, living in what has been reported as deplorable conditions. The two religious organizations have been pressing the government to release the HIV-infected refugees and allow church groups to resettle them. On June 8, U.S.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 19, 1993 | From Religious News Service
The National Council of Churches and the U.S. Catholic Conference are taking the lead in resettling the 138 HIV-infected Haitians being released from the Guantanamo Navy base in Cuba. The Haitian refugees have been held at Guantanamo since early in 1992, living in what has been reported as deplorable conditions. The two religious organizations have been pressing the government to release the HIV-infected refugees and allow church groups to resettle them. On June 8, U.S.
NEWS
January 8, 1995 | KENNETH FREED, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Nearly 300 Haitians, somber and disconsolate, were forcibly returned to their country Saturday as the United States stepped up its program to clear the refugees out of their haven at the U.S. naval base at Guantanamo Bay, Cuba. The U.S. Coast Guard cutter Boutwell arrived at midmorning with 289 refugees. Some had been at Guantanamo since last summer after fleeing Haiti's poverty and political terror in makeshift and overloaded rafts.
NEWS
June 18, 1993 | From Associated Press
A second group of Haitian refugees flew into Miami on Thursday after spending up to two years at a U.S. military camp in Cuba because they have the virus that causes AIDS. Forty to 50 passengers were aboard the C-130 transport that landed at Miami International Airport just before 10:30 a.m., said Ron Tomalis, spokesman for the U.S. Justice Department.
NEWS
November 26, 1991 | MELISSA HEALY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Defense Department began mobilizing hundreds of medical professionals, military police and refugee experts Monday for deployment to Guantanamo Bay, Cuba, where they are to assume a vastly expanded role in the care and feeding of thousands of Haitians fleeing their country's new military government, defense officials said. Responding to the growing flood of Haitian refugees, and to a Florida judge's decision prohibiting the United States from turning them back, Gen. Colin L.
NEWS
April 30, 1993 | MIKE CLARY, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Funeral services were being arranged Thursday for a 26-year-old Haitian refugee who died of AIDS two weeks after he was permitted to leave a detention camp at the U.S. Naval Base at Guantanamo Bay, Cuba, and join his father in Homestead, Fla. The death Tuesday of Joel Saintil touched off a new wave of criticism by refugee advocates over the refusal of the Clinton Administration to grant humanitarian parole to 150 other HIV-infected Haitians being held at Guantanamo.
NEWS
June 18, 1993 | From Associated Press
A second group of Haitian refugees flew into Miami on Thursday after spending up to two years at a U.S. military camp in Cuba because they have the virus that causes AIDS. Forty to 50 passengers were aboard the C-130 transport that landed at Miami International Airport just before 10:30 a.m., said Ron Tomalis, spokesman for the U.S. Justice Department.
NEWS
April 30, 1993 | MIKE CLARY, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Funeral services were being arranged Thursday for a 26-year-old Haitian refugee who died of AIDS two weeks after he was permitted to leave a detention camp at the U.S. Naval Base at Guantanamo Bay, Cuba, and join his father in Homestead, Fla. The death Tuesday of Joel Saintil touched off a new wave of criticism by refugee advocates over the refusal of the Clinton Administration to grant humanitarian parole to 150 other HIV-infected Haitians being held at Guantanamo.
NEWS
April 17, 1993 | MIKE CLARY, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Earlier this month 51 Haitian refugees, most of them with full-blown AIDS, were flown quietly to the United States and paroled to relatives in Miami, New York and Boston after they became so sick they no longer could be treated at a dusty, barbed wire-enclosed camp at Guantanamo, Cuba, where they have been held for more than a year. Still remaining at the makeshift tent city at the U.S.
NEWS
January 25, 1992 | MIKE CLARY, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Hours after 1,072 Haitian refugees were picked up at sea--a record one-day total--a Pentagon official expressed concern Friday that a new mass migration from the Caribbean island may be under way that could soon swamp a temporary tent city at the U.S. Naval Base at Guantanamo Bay, Cuba. "It'll only take a few days and we're overloaded," the official said. "Five days like this and we're in trouble." After the U.S.
NEWS
November 26, 1991 | MELISSA HEALY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Defense Department began mobilizing hundreds of medical professionals, military police and refugee experts Monday for deployment to Guantanamo Bay, Cuba, where they are to assume a vastly expanded role in the care and feeding of thousands of Haitians fleeing their country's new military government, defense officials said. Responding to the growing flood of Haitian refugees, and to a Florida judge's decision prohibiting the United States from turning them back, Gen. Colin L.
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