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Hal Fishman

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ENTERTAINMENT
June 20, 1995 | RICK DU BROW, TIMES TELEVISION WRITER
In the fickle field of local TV news, the one operation that has most resisted the ongoing game of musical chairs has been the independent station KTLA-TV Channel 5, where the 10-11 p.m. roundup anchored by Hal Fishman has long been dominant. The obvious reason is clear each night.
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ENTERTAINMENT
August 11, 2010 | By Greg Braxton, Los Angeles Times
"It's time to go. " During the late stages of an honored career that spanned more than six decades, KTLA-TV Channel 5 newsman Stan Chambers rarely considered those words in regards to stepping away from the job and station he loved. He was continually energized by covering news all around Southern California and having a front-row seat to some of the most memorable events in Los Angeles history. Plus, he was having too much fun. But Wednesday, the seemingly tireless 87-year-old Chambers, who covered numerous floods, fires, earthquakes and other catastrophes, will tell his beloved colleagues, friends and viewers that he is leaving the only TV station he's ever worked at, closing a chapter on a resume that began in 1947 and logged more than 22,000 stories.
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OPINION
August 8, 2007
Hot, orange flames were ripping a seam down the south-facing hills of Griffith Park, threatening the newly refurbished observatory and hundreds of posh hillside homes. As always, Hal Fishman was on the air, simultaneously directing coverage and ad-libbing his way through yet another live catastrophe. A Los Feliz resident was patched through by cellphone to describe the scene. "This is Hal Fishman," KTLA-TV Channel 5's anchorman said. "I know who you are," came the reply.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 2, 2009 | Greg Braxton
Veteran KNBC-TV Channel 4 newscaster Paul Moyer, one of the last of a breed of well-paid and highly promoted local news anchors, confirmed his retirement Wednesday from the station at which he's worked for nearly a quarter-century. "It's been a hell of a run," Moyer said in a brief phone interview. "I'm going to miss it, I'm going to miss it a lot. Any success I may have achieved I owe to the people of Southern California. I thank them for every one of those 37 years [in the L.A. market].
ENTERTAINMENT
October 23, 1990 | STEVE WEINSTEIN
Old teachers never die, they just bring their chalk-and-blackboard mentality to the local news. Lesson No. 1: In August, just after Iraqi troops invaded Kuwait, KTLA Channel 5 anchorman Hal Fishman dug up his Michelin road map of the Middle East desert to help illustrate the treacherous route that a convoy of buses filled with American and British women and children would have to navigate to escape Kuwait City.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 6, 1992 | BETH KLEID, Arts and entertainment reports from The Times, national and international news services and the nation's press
Star Gazing: Hal Fishman, anchor of KTLA Channel 5's "News at Ten," will receive a star on the Hollywood Walk of Fame on Wednesday. Fishman, who has been at KTLA since 1975, has been an anchor in Los Angeles for 31 years.
NEWS
October 4, 1987
I would like to commend KTLA Channel 5 for its excellent coverage of Pope John Paul II's visit. The intelligent and insightful information regarding traditions and background of the Pope and Catholic Church given by Hal Fishman and Father Michael Manning especially was much appreciated. Jeanne Wickstrom, Lake Forest
ENTERTAINMENT
April 2, 2009 | Greg Braxton
Veteran KNBC-TV Channel 4 newscaster Paul Moyer, one of the last of a breed of well-paid and highly promoted local news anchors, confirmed his retirement Wednesday from the station at which he's worked for nearly a quarter-century. "It's been a hell of a run," Moyer said in a brief phone interview. "I'm going to miss it, I'm going to miss it a lot. Any success I may have achieved I owe to the people of Southern California. I thank them for every one of those 37 years [in the L.A. market].
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 3, 2007 | Carla Rivera, Times Staff Writer
Hal Fishman, longtime anchor at KTLA Channel 5, was hospitalized with a serious infection after collapsing at his home Wednesday, the station announced at the top of its 10 p.m. newscast Thursday. Fishman, 75, was said to be awake and alert, but no other news about his condition or where he was hospitalized was available, said Rich Goldner, executive producer of KTLA Prime News. Fishman, a news veteran of more than 45 years, has anchored the station's 10 p.m. newscast since 1975.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 11, 2010 | By Greg Braxton, Los Angeles Times
"It's time to go. " During the late stages of an honored career that spanned more than six decades, KTLA-TV Channel 5 newsman Stan Chambers rarely considered those words in regards to stepping away from the job and station he loved. He was continually energized by covering news all around Southern California and having a front-row seat to some of the most memorable events in Los Angeles history. Plus, he was having too much fun. But Wednesday, the seemingly tireless 87-year-old Chambers, who covered numerous floods, fires, earthquakes and other catastrophes, will tell his beloved colleagues, friends and viewers that he is leaving the only TV station he's ever worked at, closing a chapter on a resume that began in 1947 and logged more than 22,000 stories.
OPINION
August 9, 2007
Re "Durable anchor fought TV fluff," obituary, Aug. 8 Hal Fishman was a mensch's mensch. He embodied the telling of the news itself, sooth-telling perhaps, over his 47 years as a broadcaster. Today his story is news. For tomorrow and tomorrow and tomorrow, he is irreplaceable. All our yesterdays have seen many lighted fools and our present has seen more still. Fishman was none of those; he offered his own light and was no fool.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 8, 2007 | SCOTT COLLINS, CHANNEL ISLAND
NEWS anchors just don't hang around for more than four decades anymore -- if they last a contract term or two these days, they're lucky -- which is one reason Hal Fishman's tenure at KTLA-TV was remarkable. Fishman, who died Tuesday at age 75, was the iron horse of Los Angeles broadcasting, the anchor who kept his voice steady and his mien serious even when the television station he called home lapsed into on-air silliness.
OPINION
August 8, 2007
Hot, orange flames were ripping a seam down the south-facing hills of Griffith Park, threatening the newly refurbished observatory and hundreds of posh hillside homes. As always, Hal Fishman was on the air, simultaneously directing coverage and ad-libbing his way through yet another live catastrophe. A Los Feliz resident was patched through by cellphone to describe the scene. "This is Hal Fishman," KTLA-TV Channel 5's anchorman said. "I know who you are," came the reply.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 8, 2007 | Dennis McLellan, Times Staff Writer
Hal Fishman, the award-winning KTLA-TV Channel 5 news anchor who was a Los Angeles broadcasting fixture for nearly 50 years, died Tuesday, the station announced. He was 75. Fishman died at 3 a.m. at his Brentwood home with his family at his side. He had been hospitalized with a serious infection after collapsing at his home Aug. 1, less than a week after being diagnosed with colon cancer. On Friday, the station announced that the disease had spread to his liver.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 4, 2007 | Greg Braxton, Times Staff Writer
Hundreds of messages from viewers poured in Friday wishing KTLA-TV Channel 5 anchor Hal Fishman a speedy recovery and return to his 10 p.m. newscast. Fishman, 75, was hospitalized earlier this week after collapsing at his home and has since been diagnosed with colon cancer, station officials said Friday. Doctors were treating Fishman for an infection he suffered after the collapse when they discovered the cancer, which has spread to his liver, said interim news director Rich Goldner.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 3, 2007 | Carla Rivera, Times Staff Writer
Hal Fishman, longtime anchor at KTLA Channel 5, was hospitalized with a serious infection after collapsing at his home Wednesday, the station announced at the top of its 10 p.m. newscast Thursday. Fishman, 75, was said to be awake and alert, but no other news about his condition or where he was hospitalized was available, said Rich Goldner, executive producer of KTLA Prime News. Fishman, a news veteran of more than 45 years, has anchored the station's 10 p.m. newscast since 1975.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 7, 2006
RE "Edwards Spends This Parade Out in the Cold," by Susan King, Jan. 3, and "Rain on Rose Parade Is OK for KTLA," by Scott Collins, Jan. 4: Memo to KTLA: Some things don't need to be improved. Some things are just tradition, like Bob Eubanks and Stephanie Edwards in the booth for the Rose Parade. After half an hour of this year's format, I turned off the broadcast. For the first time in 25 years, I didn't watch. Why, you ask? Because the spark wasn't there. The repartee wasn't there. The tradition wasn't there.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 17, 1998
Re Brian Lowry's article on the UCLA television violence study ("Study Finds Improvement in Handling of On-Air Violence," Jan. 14): Although Lowry regularly reports on television, he obviously is caught in this archaic notion that journalism is supposed to be objective and fair. The "real" truth about the UCLA study was reported Tuesday night on KTLA-TV Channel 5. Trusted journalist Hal Fishman shared with me and my fellow Angelenos the fantastic news that KTLA, through its affiliation with the WB Network, was contributing to a lessening of violent programming on TV. In an exciting and exclusive video clip, KTLA's beaming station manager backed up Hal's newsworthy proclamation, noting that WB's programming had received complimentary mention in the UCLA study.
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