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Hal Ketchum

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ENTERTAINMENT
October 8, 1992 | RICHARD CROMELIN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Hal Ketchum doesn't come to Nashville by the usual country roads. Born and raised in the Adirondacks of New York, he played R&B drums as a youth, then moved into the Austin singer-songwriter scene of the early '80s. Add Van Morrison and Jonathan Edwards influences to the usual country foundation of Haggard and Jones, and you have the makings of something slightly different.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 29, 1994 | STEVE HOCHMAN
The spangly, red leather jacket Hal Ketchum wore for the first part of his House of Blues show Thursday seemed a bit at odds with the literate earthiness of his songs. But the earnest enthusiasm with which he performed showed that even in the restrictive world of country music, you can have it both ways.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 29, 1994 | STEVE HOCHMAN
The spangly, red leather jacket Hal Ketchum wore for the first part of his House of Blues show Thursday seemed a bit at odds with the literate earthiness of his songs. But the earnest enthusiasm with which he performed showed that even in the restrictive world of country music, you can have it both ways.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 29, 1993 | MIKE BOEHM, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Hal Ketchum's latest album, "Sure Love," ends with a song about a restless soul in the Old West--a man who sees a newspaper account about wagons heading for gold country, and catches the prospecting fever on the spot. Ketchum's song, "Someplace Far Away," is ambiguous as to whether the man follows through on his dream. He is married to a woman who "didn't want to be no . . . prospector's wife," according to the young son who is the tale's narrator.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 27, 1991 | MIKE BOEHM, TIMES STAFF WRITER
If the domain of country music were one big metropolis, Nashville would be a moneyed, well-ordered neighborhood founded on commerce and convention, while Austin, Tex., would be a bohemian loft district across the tracks, full of scruffy, art-first eccentrics with holes in their pants. Hal Ketchum is the latest member of the Texas bohemian school to try life on the other side of the tracks.
NEWS
August 11, 1994 | ROBYN LOEWENTHAL, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Sometimes opportunity does knock twice. So if you missed the local appearances of hot country stars Hal Ketchum and Carlene Carter during the last few months, Wednesday is your lucky night. That's when Texas singer-songwriter Ketchum will headline the opening night of the Grandstand Concert Series at the Ventura County Fair. Joining him will be Carter, a third-generation member of one of country music's legendary families.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 6, 2001
Gigi, "Gigi," Palm Wayne Hancock, "A-Town Blues," Bloodshot Hal Ketchum, "Lucky Man," Curb Love as Laughter, "Sea to Shining Sea," Sub Pop Roger McGuinn, "Treasures From the Folk Den," Appleseed Murder City Devils, "Thelema," Sub Pop Orbital, "The Altogether," ffrr/London/Sire Joshua Perahia, "Something to Say," M&K The Residents, "Icky Flix," East Side Digital Stanton Warriors, "The Stanton Session," XL Sunset Valley, "Icepond," Barsuk 3 Mustaphas 3, "Play Musty for Me," Omnium Caetano Veloso,
NEWS
August 11, 1994 | ROBYN LOEWENTHAL, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Sometimes opportunity does knock twice. So if you missed the local appearances of hot country stars Hal Ketchum and Carlene Carter during the last few months, Wednesday is your lucky night. That's when Texas singer-songwriter Ketchum will headline the opening night of the Grandstand Concert Series at the Ventura County Fair. Joining him will be Carter, a third-generation member of one of country music's legendary families.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 29, 1993 | MIKE BOEHM, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Hal Ketchum's latest album, "Sure Love," ends with a song about a restless soul in the Old West--a man who sees a newspaper account about wagons heading for gold country, and catches the prospecting fever on the spot. Ketchum's song, "Someplace Far Away," is ambiguous as to whether the man follows through on his dream. He is married to a woman who "didn't want to be no . . . prospector's wife," according to the young son who is the tale's narrator.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 8, 1992 | RICHARD CROMELIN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Hal Ketchum doesn't come to Nashville by the usual country roads. Born and raised in the Adirondacks of New York, he played R&B drums as a youth, then moved into the Austin singer-songwriter scene of the early '80s. Add Van Morrison and Jonathan Edwards influences to the usual country foundation of Haggard and Jones, and you have the makings of something slightly different.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 27, 1991 | MIKE BOEHM, TIMES STAFF WRITER
If the domain of country music were one big metropolis, Nashville would be a moneyed, well-ordered neighborhood founded on commerce and convention, while Austin, Tex., would be a bohemian loft district across the tracks, full of scruffy, art-first eccentrics with holes in their pants. Hal Ketchum is the latest member of the Texas bohemian school to try life on the other side of the tracks.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 24, 1992
A benefit concert in Anaheim for Hugh Wright, the injured drummer of the country band Boy Howdy, netted more than $7,000 Monday night, according to band manager Alan Hopper. Wright suffered severe leg and head injuries two months ago while trying to come to the aid of a motorist who had been injured in a wreck on a Dallas freeway. More than 700 people attended the benefit at the Cowboy Boogie Co., Hopper said.
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