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Hal Riney

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BUSINESS
June 19, 1990 | BRUCE HOROVITZ, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Unwitting Communist leaders walked away Monday evening with perhaps the premier prize in capitalism--the Clio Award for the best national TV ad campaign. The award went to three spots for Stroh's Light beer that feature cleverly dubbed newsreel footage of Fidel Castro, Daniel Ortega and Nikita Khrushchev. The ads were created by the San Francisco agency Hal Riney & Partners. The outcome was assuredly not a Communist plot.
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NEWS
July 4, 1992 | From Associated Press
Presumptive Democratic presidential nominee Bill Clinton is signing up a cadre of new ad makers who have proven their prowess at marketing everything from build-it-yourself tables to California wine. Prospective independent candidate Ross Perot, meanwhile, has hired for his campaign the creator of the "Swedish Bikini Team" beer commercials and Ronald Reagan's 1984 "Morning in America" reelection theme.
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BUSINESS
June 5, 1988
Good luck to advertising whiz Hal Riney, who landed the account for General Motors' Saturn cars ("GM Selects Riney Ad Agency for New Line," May 25). People like me, long amused by crazy names for cars, laugh our heads off noting that "Saturn" is the ancient alchemist's name for the metal lead, and the adjective saturnine, derived from the planet's slow motion relative to other planets, means "slow, sluggish, disagreeable." Great name for a car going head-to-head against imports. JOHN H. GARDNER San Pedro
BUSINESS
June 19, 1990 | BRUCE HOROVITZ, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Unwitting Communist leaders walked away Monday evening with perhaps the premier prize in capitalism--the Clio Award for the best national TV ad campaign. The award went to three spots for Stroh's Light beer that feature cleverly dubbed newsreel footage of Fidel Castro, Daniel Ortega and Nikita Khrushchev. The ads were created by the San Francisco agency Hal Riney & Partners. The outcome was assuredly not a Communist plot.
BUSINESS
March 17, 1990 | BRUCE HOROVITZ, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Hal Riney is famous for creating laid-back advertising characters such as Frank Bartles and Ed Jaymes, who seemingly haven't got any problems in the world. But these days, Riney's San Francisco ad agency, Hal Riney & Partners, must be feeling squeezed like grapes in a wine press. The firm is struggling to create an ad strategy for Saturn, the car that GM plans to introduce this fall in an already glutted market.
BUSINESS
December 5, 1987 | BRUCE HOROVITZ, Times Staff Writer
It's enough to make ever-silent Ed Jaymes talk. The ad agency that invented this ultraquiet wine cooler pitchman--along with his good-ol'-boy partner Frank Bartles--has resigned the $78-million E&J Gallo Winery account. The decision by the Hal Riney & Partners agency could spell the end of the Bartles & Jaymes duo made famous by their oft-repeated commercial line, "Thank you for your support." Gallo, however, remains a winery with plenty of support.
BUSINESS
April 26, 1988 | BRUCE HOROVITZ
He wanted a name that didn't sound like a wine cooler. So the ad agency chief sat down at his desk, thumbed through the San Francisco telephone directory, and stopped at a spot in the "B" section. There it was. The first name that caught his eye: Bartles. Hmmm. Something was still missing. So the ad executive continued flipping through the phone book. This time, he stopped in the "J" portion. And the finger of fate stopped at the name Jameson.
BUSINESS
May 25, 1988 | JESUS SANCHEZ, Times Staff Writer
Hal Riney & Partners, the San Francisco ad agency that created wine cooler pitchmen Frank Bartles and Ed Jaymes, on Tuesday drove away with the highly coveted job of creating more than $100 million in advertising for a new line of General Motors cars. It was a sweet and crucial victory for agency Chairman Hal Riney, who was counting on the GM campaign to make up for the $78-million E & J Gallo Winery account that the agency gave up last December following a number of disputes.
NEWS
July 4, 1992 | From Associated Press
Presumptive Democratic presidential nominee Bill Clinton is signing up a cadre of new ad makers who have proven their prowess at marketing everything from build-it-yourself tables to California wine. Prospective independent candidate Ross Perot, meanwhile, has hired for his campaign the creator of the "Swedish Bikini Team" beer commercials and Ronald Reagan's 1984 "Morning in America" reelection theme.
BUSINESS
August 13, 1999
Los Angeles-based Homestore.com Inc. has chosen TBWA/Chiat/Day of Los Angeles to handle its brand advertising account. Billings are estimated at $50 million. . . . Santa Monica-based EToys Inc. named San Francisco-based Publicis & Hal Riney as its advertising agency. Billings were not disclosed.
BUSINESS
March 17, 1990 | BRUCE HOROVITZ, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Hal Riney is famous for creating laid-back advertising characters such as Frank Bartles and Ed Jaymes, who seemingly haven't got any problems in the world. But these days, Riney's San Francisco ad agency, Hal Riney & Partners, must be feeling squeezed like grapes in a wine press. The firm is struggling to create an ad strategy for Saturn, the car that GM plans to introduce this fall in an already glutted market.
BUSINESS
June 5, 1988
Good luck to advertising whiz Hal Riney, who landed the account for General Motors' Saturn cars ("GM Selects Riney Ad Agency for New Line," May 25). People like me, long amused by crazy names for cars, laugh our heads off noting that "Saturn" is the ancient alchemist's name for the metal lead, and the adjective saturnine, derived from the planet's slow motion relative to other planets, means "slow, sluggish, disagreeable." Great name for a car going head-to-head against imports. JOHN H. GARDNER San Pedro
BUSINESS
May 25, 1988 | JESUS SANCHEZ, Times Staff Writer
Hal Riney & Partners, the San Francisco ad agency that created wine cooler pitchmen Frank Bartles and Ed Jaymes, on Tuesday drove away with the highly coveted job of creating more than $100 million in advertising for a new line of General Motors cars. It was a sweet and crucial victory for agency Chairman Hal Riney, who was counting on the GM campaign to make up for the $78-million E & J Gallo Winery account that the agency gave up last December following a number of disputes.
BUSINESS
April 26, 1988 | BRUCE HOROVITZ
He wanted a name that didn't sound like a wine cooler. So the ad agency chief sat down at his desk, thumbed through the San Francisco telephone directory, and stopped at a spot in the "B" section. There it was. The first name that caught his eye: Bartles. Hmmm. Something was still missing. So the ad executive continued flipping through the phone book. This time, he stopped in the "J" portion. And the finger of fate stopped at the name Jameson.
BUSINESS
December 5, 1987 | BRUCE HOROVITZ, Times Staff Writer
It's enough to make ever-silent Ed Jaymes talk. The ad agency that invented this ultraquiet wine cooler pitchman--along with his good-ol'-boy partner Frank Bartles--has resigned the $78-million E&J Gallo Winery account. The decision by the Hal Riney & Partners agency could spell the end of the Bartles & Jaymes duo made famous by their oft-repeated commercial line, "Thank you for your support." Gallo, however, remains a winery with plenty of support.
NEWS
April 3, 2008
Riney obituary: The obituary of advertising executive Hal Riney in Friday's California section said Riney commissioned "We've Only Just Begun" from songwriter Paul Williams for a Crocker Bank commercial. The song was written by Williams and Roger Nichols.
BUSINESS
May 12, 1998
* San Diego-based Foodmaker Inc., parent of the Jack in the Box fast-food chain, reported fiscal second-quarter earnings of $8.7 million, or 22 cents per diluted share, not including one-time items, compared with $6.7 million, or 17 cents, a year ago. * Publicis of France and San Francisco-based Hal Riney & Partners said they have agreed to combine to form a global advertising partnership. The firm will be renamed Publicis-Hal Riney & Partners. Terms of the deal were not disclosed.
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