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Hal Ward

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SPORTS
November 9, 1990 | RICH ROBERTS
The wind was only four knots, and Cheval needed a delicate touch on the helm to keep her speed up . . . the touch, someone noted, of an eye surgeon, which is what the skipper happens to be. Hal Ward, responding to his own senses and input from the crew, steered his big boat around the course to victory. Afterward, as the crew came aft to congratulate him, the significance of the moment was clear: Ward, a paraplegic, had never steered his own boat in a race until that weekend.
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SPORTS
November 9, 1990 | RICH ROBERTS
The wind was only four knots, and Cheval needed a delicate touch on the helm to keep her speed up . . . the touch, someone noted, of an eye surgeon, which is what the skipper happens to be. Hal Ward, responding to his own senses and input from the crew, steered his big boat around the course to victory. Afterward, as the crew came aft to congratulate him, the significance of the moment was clear: Ward, a paraplegic, had never steered his own boat in a race until that weekend.
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SPORTS
July 12, 1995 | From Associated Press
Hal Ward's Cheval '95 finished the 38th biennial Transpacific Yacht Race with a broken mast Tuesday but held its lead to claim the Barn Door trophy as the monohull with the fastest elapsed time--nine days, one hour, 32 minutes and 20 seconds. The Andrews 70, sailing its maiden race, started the day with a 46-mile lead over Rich DeVos' 74-foot Windquest and broke its mast while running in strong winds only 25 miles from the finish.
SPORTS
July 9, 1995 | Associated Press
Far out in the Pacific on Saturday, the 38th Transpacific Yacht Race had developed into a grudge match between Hal Ward's Cheval '95 and Rich DeVos' Windquest to see which could reach Hawaii first. Their positions at the morning roll call showed both boats in good winds with 926 miles to go and leaving all of the other monohulls behind. Cheval '95's course was about 25 miles north of Windquest's. "We are in good position to make a run at Cheval," project coordinator John Bertrand said.
SPORTS
November 9, 1992 | From Staff and Wire Reports
Cheetah, the older Peterson 66 owned by Doug Baker and Dick Pennington of Long Beach, held a one-mile lead over Dick Compton's Andrews 68 Alchemy from Santa Barbara after the first day of a slow yacht race from Los Angeles to Cabo San Lucas. Cheetah, averaging only 5.4 knots in light wind, reported a position 102 miles out after 19 hours of the 802-nautical mile race. Hal Ward's Cheval dropped out for a reason not explained, reducing the fleet to 18 boats.
MAGAZINE
June 21, 1992
I was impressed by Strong's commitment to the future of our planet, especially since he has worked on the industrial/ business side of the environ- mental equation. However, he fails to note that Third World populations, struggling to feed increasing numbers of mouths, will continue to use up an increasing number of acres of land and then move on to more. While the United States adds the equivalent of another Los Angeles to its population each year, how can the environment possibly be improved?
SPORTS
February 25, 1989 | ALMON LOCKABEY
Silver Bullet, a Santa Cruz-70 skippered by John DeLaura of Waikiki Yacht Club, finished at 12:24:42 a.m. Friday to take line honors in the 1,125-mile yacht race from Marina del Rey to Puerto Vallarta. Hal Ward's Nelson-Marek 70, Cheval, was 26 minutes behind Silver Bullet, and by 7:30 a.m., three other yachts had finished. Silver Bullet's elapsed time was about 12 hours short of the record, 4 days 23 hours, set by Dick Daniels' MacGregor 65, Joss, in 1985.
SPORTS
November 17, 1991 | From Staff and Wire Reports
Dick Daniels slipped his MacGregor 65 Joss off by itself and took the early lead at the start of the biennial Long Beach-to-Cabo San Lucas race. While Hal Ward's Cheval led the fleet of nine faster ULDB 70s hard into a nine-knot southwest wind, Joss stayed closest to the beach of all the 15 second-day starters. Trailing in a pack were Evolution, Cheetah and the new Victoria. Cheval started at the leeward end of the line off Belmont Pier, followed closely by Joss.
SPORTS
February 10, 1990 | RICH ROBERTS
The first 10 sailboats in the San Diego-to-Manzanillo race broke the record in what some observers were calling the fastest Mexican race ever--and certainly one of the tightest finishes. Hal Ward's 67-foot Cheval was first to finish at 8:54 Thursday night, followed only 4 minutes 6 seconds later by Ed McDowell's 68-foot Grand Illusion, a Bill Lee design that nudged Cheval for first place on corrected time.
SPORTS
July 11, 1995 | From Associated Press
One boat's mast was broken, other boats paid a lesser price, and some benefited Monday from the strong winds that had been missing for the first half of the 38th Transpacific Yacht Race. Hatsu, a 66 1/2-foot sloop owned by Masonori Kusaka of Newport Beach, with America's Cup skipper Makoto Namba as navigator, reported it was proceeding slowly under a jury rig after most of its mast broke away when the fleet encountered trade winds of more than 20 knots the last few days.
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