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BUSINESS
December 31, 1991 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
France Bans Form of Halcion: France's Health Ministry said it is banning sales of a higher-dose version of Halcion, the world's best-selling sleeping pill. Upjohn Co., the Kalamazoo, Mich.-based manufacturer of Halcion, said it will appeal the decision. France is the second country to act against the drug in two months. In October, Britain ordered it off pharmacy shelves because of safety concerns. An ingredient in Halcion is said to produce such side effects as memory loss and depression.
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BUSINESS
June 3, 1994 | From Associated Press
Upjohn Co. has again beaten back legal claims that its sleep-inducing drug Halcion causes bizarre and sometimes violent behavior. But the company and some drug industry analysts said Thursday that they are skeptical about whether such victories will do much to change an image problem that has led to sinking sales. "It's very difficult to undo the story that gets implanted in people's minds when there's a whole string of negative media about the product," Upjohn spokeswoman Kaye Bennett said.
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NEWS
October 3, 1991 | WILLIAM TUOHY and MARLENE CIMONS, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
The British government on Wednesday banned the drug Halcion, the world's most widely prescribed sleeping pill. Halcion, and other medicines containing triazolam, have been associated with psychological side effects, particularly memory loss and depression, an announcement from the Department of Health said.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 12, 1993 | JONATHAN GAW, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A countersuit brought by the owner of the defunct Country Oaks Escrow Co. in Santa Clarita against four pharmaceutical companies last week revisits the debate over the alleged personality-altering effects of the sleeping pill Halcion. In the suit, Harold Wiener, who is accused of embezzling more than $3 million from the Country Oaks trust fund, blamed his actions on side effects from Halcion, the organ transplant drug Sandimmune and the ulcer drugs Zantac and Carafate.
NEWS
February 6, 1992 | Reuters
President Bush has stopped taking the sleeping pill Halcion because of the controversy over its potential side effects, White House spokesman Marlin Fitzwater said Wednesday. Fitzwater said the President last used Halcion during his 12-day tour of Asia, which ended Jan. 10. Bush told reporters during the trip that he had taken half a tablet to fight jet lag. "He has taken it on trips in the past, but he doesn't take it on a daily basis," Fitzwater said.
BUSINESS
September 19, 1989 | From Times Wire Services
Reports of bizarre side effects--including a fatal shooting, hallucinations and amnesia--have triggered a Food and Drug administration safety review of the world's best-selling sleeping pill. The drug is Halcion, made by Upjohn Co. of Kalamazoo, Mich. A Food and Drug Administration advisory committee will meet Friday to consider whether doctors and patients should be advised to limit its use, FDA officials said.
BUSINESS
June 3, 1994 | From Associated Press
Upjohn Co. has again beaten back legal claims that its sleep-inducing drug Halcion causes bizarre and sometimes violent behavior. But the company and some drug industry analysts said Thursday that they are skeptical about whether such victories will do much to change an image problem that has led to sinking sales. "It's very difficult to undo the story that gets implanted in people's minds when there's a whole string of negative media about the product," Upjohn spokeswoman Kaye Bennett said.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 12, 1993 | JONATHAN GAW, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A countersuit brought by the owner of the defunct Country Oaks Escrow Co. in Santa Clarita against four pharmaceutical companies last week revisits the debate over the alleged personality-altering effects of the sleeping pill Halcion. In the suit, Harold Wiener, who is accused of embezzling more than $3 million from the Country Oaks trust fund, blamed his actions on side effects from Halcion, the organ transplant drug Sandimmune and the ulcer drugs Zantac and Carafate.
NEWS
May 19, 1992 | PAUL HOUSTON and PAMELA WARRICK, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
A government advisory committee voted, 7 to 1, Monday to recommend continued use of the controversial sleeping drug Halcion but urged stronger warning labels about dosage and possible side effects, such as anxiety and impaired memory. The Food and Drug Administration, which impaneled the committee of physicians and professors after Great Britain banned the drug last fall, is expected to follow the recommendations.
NEWS
October 8, 1991 | SHARI ROAN, TIMES HEALTH WRITER
American doctors who treat people with insomnia say they are perplexed by the British government's decision last week to withdraw the popular sleeping drug Halcion from the market, citing a high risk of potentially dangerous side effects. According to several veteran sleep-disorder experts, the tales of violent behavior and paranoia that some patients have blamed on Halcion are not supported by American doctors' extensive experience in prescribing the drug or by clinical studies.
BUSINESS
November 16, 1992 | From Associated Press
Sales of the sleeping pill Halcion have plunged since people began claiming the drug induced violence, and last week's jury verdict against Upjohn Co. won't help. Upjohn maintains that Halcion is safe and effective when used for short periods of time as recommended. But many insomniacs apparently aren't convinced. "We still have solid support from physicians and pharmacists.
NEWS
May 19, 1992 | PAUL HOUSTON and PAMELA WARRICK, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
A government advisory committee voted, 7 to 1, Monday to recommend continued use of the controversial sleeping drug Halcion but urged stronger warning labels about dosage and possible side effects, such as anxiety and impaired memory. The Food and Drug Administration, which impaneled the committee of physicians and professors after Great Britain banned the drug last fall, is expected to follow the recommendations.
NEWS
February 6, 1992 | Reuters
President Bush has stopped taking the sleeping pill Halcion because of the controversy over its potential side effects, White House spokesman Marlin Fitzwater said Wednesday. Fitzwater said the President last used Halcion during his 12-day tour of Asia, which ended Jan. 10. Bush told reporters during the trip that he had taken half a tablet to fight jet lag. "He has taken it on trips in the past, but he doesn't take it on a daily basis," Fitzwater said.
BUSINESS
December 31, 1991 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
France Bans Form of Halcion: France's Health Ministry said it is banning sales of a higher-dose version of Halcion, the world's best-selling sleeping pill. Upjohn Co., the Kalamazoo, Mich.-based manufacturer of Halcion, said it will appeal the decision. France is the second country to act against the drug in two months. In October, Britain ordered it off pharmacy shelves because of safety concerns. An ingredient in Halcion is said to produce such side effects as memory loss and depression.
NEWS
October 8, 1991 | SHARI ROAN, TIMES HEALTH WRITER
American doctors who treat people with insomnia say they are perplexed by the British government's decision last week to withdraw the popular sleeping drug Halcion from the market, citing a high risk of potentially dangerous side effects. According to several veteran sleep-disorder experts, the tales of violent behavior and paranoia that some patients have blamed on Halcion are not supported by American doctors' extensive experience in prescribing the drug or by clinical studies.
NEWS
October 3, 1991 | WILLIAM TUOHY and MARLENE CIMONS, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
The British government on Wednesday banned the drug Halcion, the world's most widely prescribed sleeping pill. Halcion, and other medicines containing triazolam, have been associated with psychological side effects, particularly memory loss and depression, an announcement from the Department of Health said.
BUSINESS
November 16, 1992 | From Associated Press
Sales of the sleeping pill Halcion have plunged since people began claiming the drug induced violence, and last week's jury verdict against Upjohn Co. won't help. Upjohn maintains that Halcion is safe and effective when used for short periods of time as recommended. But many insomniacs apparently aren't convinced. "We still have solid support from physicians and pharmacists.
BUSINESS
October 18, 1991 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Group Wants Criminal Probe of Halcion: Public Citizen, a consumer group, wants a criminal investigation to determine whether the maker of the popular sleep medication Halcion misrepresented potentially dangerous side effects. The group also urged the Food and Drug Administration to strengthen the warning label on the drug's possible adverse reactions, which range from anxiety to hallucinations. A British Broadcasting Corp. program has alleged that Upjohn Co.
BUSINESS
September 19, 1989 | From Times Wire Services
Reports of bizarre side effects--including a fatal shooting, hallucinations and amnesia--have triggered a Food and Drug administration safety review of the world's best-selling sleeping pill. The drug is Halcion, made by Upjohn Co. of Kalamazoo, Mich. A Food and Drug Administration advisory committee will meet Friday to consider whether doctors and patients should be advised to limit its use, FDA officials said.
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