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Hall Of Justice

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 17, 2001
The Board of Supervisors on Tuesday took the next step toward refurbishing the historic Hall of Justice by deciding to accept proposals from the private sector. Sheriff Lee Baca and Supervisor Mike Antonovich are leading the effort to revitalize the Italian Renaissance-style structure. While Baca wants to move his offices, now in Monterey Park, back downtown, Antonovich and others cite the cultural importance of the historic building.
ARTICLES BY DATE
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 9, 2013 | By Bob Pool, Los Angeles Times
Cops and prosecutors are returning to the scene of the grime. But things will be brighter when the former occupants of the Hall of Justice move their offices back into the downtown Los Angeles landmark. Work crews making seismic repairs to the building next month will begin blasting away 88 years' worth of soot, dirt and smog that have turned its exterior a dull, dirty gray color. When they finish this fall, project managers say the 14-story beaux-arts building will glisten as brightly as the slightly newer Los Angeles City Hall, which is diagonally across the street.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 26, 2002 | CECILIA RASMUSSEN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
At the site of the Hall of Justice, life and death have been meted out for more than a century to a who's who of Los Angeles' famous and felonious. The imposing edifice, bounded by Broadway, Spring and Temple streets, has been the scene of sensational trials and the temporary address of depraved criminals. Murderer Charles Manson pronounced the accommodations "Stone Age."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 6, 2012 | By Harriet Ryan, Los Angeles Times
To work in the file room of the downtown criminal courts building is to be a librarian of evils. Its shelves hold the official records of rapes, murders, robberies and thousands of other offenses prosecuted in the courthouse and the clerks there know the ugliness of society by name and case number. It is perhaps not surprising then that on his lunch hour, an employee named Marcos Saldana was drawn to a scene of natural beauty. It was a ravens' nest on the ledge of a building across Temple Street and Saldana watched each spring as the same pair of birds rebuilt the nest, hatched their chicks and taught them to fly. "Birds are beautiful," Saldana said, standing at his usual vantage point, a window in the L.A. courthouse's 13th floor snack bar. "They can fly away and go wherever they want, whereas we are stuck to the ground.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 23, 1996
Another Civic Center landmark with a colorful past faces an uncertain future. The venerable Hall of Justice, where such famous criminals as Bugsy Siegel, Caryl Chessman, Charles Manson and Sirhan Sirhan were tried, sits empty, red-tagged since the Northridge earthquake. "Only the parking lot is used," said a spokesman for the Los Angeles County Sheriff's Department, the last tenant.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 29, 2006 | Cecilia Rasmussen, Times Staff Writer
Judge Arthur L. Alarcon identifies with Los Angeles' old downtown Hall of Justice: It was built in 1925, the same year the federal appeals court judge was born, and is where he started his legal career more than 50 years ago. Alarcon, 81, an avid walker and gardener, is in much better physical shape than the building, which closed in 1994 for safety reasons and over the years had fallen into shambles.
OPINION
April 4, 1999
Re "Sheriff Wants to Move Into Old Hall of Justice," March 30: Sheriff Lee Baca wants to move downtown. More precisely, he wants to spend $100 million to renovate the old Hall of Justice because he doesn't want county officers "to see [him] as being detached." Detached? What an ironic choice of words. The world is going virtual and our thoughtful sheriff wants to spend $100 million in county funds to be close to the action. Well, not quite. He expect to recover $80 million from federal taxpayers.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 9, 2013 | By Bob Pool, Los Angeles Times
Cops and prosecutors are returning to the scene of the grime. But things will be brighter when the former occupants of the Hall of Justice move their offices back into the downtown Los Angeles landmark. Work crews making seismic repairs to the building next month will begin blasting away 88 years' worth of soot, dirt and smog that have turned its exterior a dull, dirty gray color. When they finish this fall, project managers say the 14-story beaux-arts building will glisten as brightly as the slightly newer Los Angeles City Hall, which is diagonally across the street.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 15, 1993 | JIM HERRON ZAMORA
A Reseda man in custody on drug and firearms charges escaped Thursday from the downtown Los Angeles Hall of Justice by scaling an 18-foot fence topped with razor wire, authorities said. Brian J. Cullen, 33, was with other inmates in the outside compound of the building at 211 W. Temple St. when he escaped about 6 a.m., the Los Angeles County Sheriff's Department said. "He apparently broke out of the line, climbed over an 18-foot-fence and ran off," Deputy Jeff Cannon said.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 2, 2009 | By Garrett Therolf
Los Angeles County's Hall of Justice, vacant since it was damaged in the 1994 Northridge earthquake, might be reopened. The Board of Supervisors ordered staff Tuesday to prepare a report within 45 days on the feasibility of again using the facility, noting that construction costs have decreased over the last year and that available federal funds have increased. The ornate 14-story building, at the corner of Temple Street and Broadway in downtown Los Angeles, was built in 1925 and once housed a jail, county courts and coroner's, sheriff's and district attorney's offices.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 2, 2009 | By Garrett Therolf
Los Angeles County's Hall of Justice, vacant since it was damaged in the 1994 Northridge earthquake, might be reopened. The Board of Supervisors ordered staff Tuesday to prepare a report within 45 days on the feasibility of again using the facility, noting that construction costs have decreased over the last year and that available federal funds have increased. The ornate 14-story building, at the corner of Temple Street and Broadway in downtown Los Angeles, was built in 1925 and once housed a jail, county courts and coroner's, sheriff's and district attorney's offices.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 29, 2006 | Cecilia Rasmussen, Times Staff Writer
Judge Arthur L. Alarcon identifies with Los Angeles' old downtown Hall of Justice: It was built in 1925, the same year the federal appeals court judge was born, and is where he started his legal career more than 50 years ago. Alarcon, 81, an avid walker and gardener, is in much better physical shape than the building, which closed in 1994 for safety reasons and over the years had fallen into shambles.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 30, 2006 | Ashley Surdin, Times Staff Writer
Mobster Benjamin "Bugsy" Siegel feasted on pheasant while under lockup there. Charles Manson, during his murder trial, unsuccessfully dangled string out his jail cell window to smuggle marijuana and a hacksaw. The bodies of Marilyn Monroe, Sharon Tate and Robert F. Kennedy were examined in its basement. For decades, downtown's Hall of Justice was the stage upon which many of the darker scenes of Los Angeles County history played out.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 26, 2002 | CECILIA RASMUSSEN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
At the site of the Hall of Justice, life and death have been meted out for more than a century to a who's who of Los Angeles' famous and felonious. The imposing edifice, bounded by Broadway, Spring and Temple streets, has been the scene of sensational trials and the temporary address of depraved criminals. Murderer Charles Manson pronounced the accommodations "Stone Age."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 17, 2001
The Board of Supervisors on Tuesday took the next step toward refurbishing the historic Hall of Justice by deciding to accept proposals from the private sector. Sheriff Lee Baca and Supervisor Mike Antonovich are leading the effort to revitalize the Italian Renaissance-style structure. While Baca wants to move his offices, now in Monterey Park, back downtown, Antonovich and others cite the cultural importance of the historic building.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 11, 2000 | NICOLAI OUROUSSOFF, TIMES ARCHITECTURE CRITIC
It may be hard to believe for those who like government buildings decoratedwith granite staircases and marble colonnades, but the most beautiful courthouse built in America in years is a work as sleek and modern as a Swiss watch.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 23, 1985
A fight broke out in a chow line at the Hall of Justice jail downtown Friday evening resulting in several injuries and a lockdown of the facility, sheriff's deputies said. At least six prisoners were treated for injuries ranging from minor stab wounds to a broken leg, deputies said, adding that 15 to 20 inmates were involved in the melee.
NEWS
December 24, 1987 | MARY BARBER, Times Staff Writer
Fourteen years after graduating with honors from Harvard Law School, Ralph Mitzenmacher walked out on a successful legal career in Los Angeles to begin a scholarly life that promises neither professional nor financial rewards. Lee Ann Meyer did the same. A UCLA graduate, Meyer was a specialist in public interest law who left her job as litigation associate with a Los Angeles firm.
OPINION
April 4, 1999
Re "Sheriff Wants to Move Into Old Hall of Justice," March 30: Sheriff Lee Baca wants to move downtown. More precisely, he wants to spend $100 million to renovate the old Hall of Justice because he doesn't want county officers "to see [him] as being detached." Detached? What an ironic choice of words. The world is going virtual and our thoughtful sheriff wants to spend $100 million in county funds to be close to the action. Well, not quite. He expect to recover $80 million from federal taxpayers.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 30, 1999 | TINA DAUNT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Los Angeles County Sheriff Lee Baca is proposing a multimillion-dollar plan to renovate and reopen the old Hall of Justice building in downtown's Civic Center, a move that would allow him to relocate his office from the department's quiet hillside compound in Monterey Park to Los Angeles' political hub.
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