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Halley

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 2, 1985 | Associated Press
NASA on Tuesday named two Maryland astronomers to fly on the space shuttle next March 6 to study Halley's comet from above the disturbance of Earth's atmosphere. Samuel T. Dorrance, 42, of Johns Hopkins University in Baltimore and Ronald A. Parise, 34, of Computer Sciences Corp. in Silver Spring are to go on the mission.
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SCIENCE
May 4, 2013 | By Deborah Netburn
Pull out the reclining lawn chairs and get yourself to the darkest area you can find: The Eta Aquarid meteor shower is peaking this weekend, and if you get lucky, you can catch up to 30 "shooting stars" per hour. You may also want to set your alarm clock: Sky watchers say the best time to catch the light show is in the hour or two just before dawn on Sunday. Here in Southern California that means you'll want to start your meteor hunting around 4 a.m. The Eta Aquarid meteor shower occurs each year in late April or early May when the Earth passes through a stream of dust and debris left in the wake of Halley's Comet.
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NEWS
July 20, 1986
Norman Thrower, professor of geography and director of UCLA's William Andrews Clark Memorial Library, has received the first UCLA Speakers Bureau award. Thrower, an authority on the history of discoveries and Halley's comet, was honored for his participation in Speaker's Bureau programs. He also was recognized by the Los Angeles City Council for his activities.
NEWS
August 18, 1994 | JIM WASHBURN
There are so many singer-songwriters in Austin, Tex., that you could use them for kindling and still have enough left over to gather around the fire to harmonize on "Cotton-Eyed Joe." Yet, even in that crowded company, David Halley stands out. Fans of Texas music have likely heard his "Hard Livin' "--with its refrain, "I wish hard livin' didn't come so easy to me"--covered by Joe Ely.
SCIENCE
May 4, 2013 | By Deborah Netburn
Pull out the reclining lawn chairs and get yourself to the darkest area you can find: The Eta Aquarid meteor shower is peaking this weekend, and if you get lucky, you can catch up to 30 "shooting stars" per hour. You may also want to set your alarm clock: Sky watchers say the best time to catch the light show is in the hour or two just before dawn on Sunday. Here in Southern California that means you'll want to start your meteor hunting around 4 a.m. The Eta Aquarid meteor shower occurs each year in late April or early May when the Earth passes through a stream of dust and debris left in the wake of Halley's Comet.
NEWS
December 15, 1985
You may already know how "Grandma Got Run Over by a Reindeer" ranked among all Christmas singles in sales last year, but do you know the percentage of third-graders in Oklahoma who say they chew tobacco or the number of Americans old enough to see Halley's comet for the second time this winter? Number of White House requests for arms sales to a foreign country that Congress has rejected: 0 Soviet nuclear-weapon tests this year: 7 U.S.
NEWS
February 26, 1985 | JENNINGS PARROTT
--A check of his driver's license shows his birth date as 2/23/85, but the date is accurate. Tommy Wright was indeed born in '85--1885--and celebrated his 100th birthday last Saturday. He and his 96-year-old wife, Sadie, have been married for 78 years. Wright, who has never had an accident or a moving violation, just had his license renewed. "I'm the best damn driver in the whole state of Rhode Island," he told the Providence Journal Bulletin.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 29, 1985
When I was 17, that was 75 years ago, I saw and celebrated it--maybe not scientifically, but with lots of fun and interest as something special in our daily lives, on top of a two-story tenement in Brooklyn, N.Y. We observed, sang, danced and drank Coca Cola. My recollection is a bit dim, a great ball of fire and a lingering tail. This year, however, it will be different, coming to California to live. I've seen, learned and studied the heavens and shall go out to the deserts, mountaintops, observatories with interested groups.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 30, 1985
The 100-inch telescope on Mt. Wilson above Pasadena was once one of the world's great astronomical instruments. Edwin Hubble used it in the 1920s to make two fundamental discoveries: that the universe is expanding, and that it contains billions of other galaxies just like ours. But light pollution from Los Angeles seriously degraded the telescope's ability to peer into deep space.Last year the Carnegie Institution of Washington, which owns and runs the Mt.
NEWS
April 2, 1986 | LEE DYE, Times Science Writer
My wife and I rolled out of bed at 3:45 a.m. recently for one more look at Halley's comet. We drove a few blocks to the tip of the Palos Verdes Peninsula, where the lights of the city would be behind us and Halley would be visible in the dark sky over the Pacific. But scores of others had the same idea. When we reached the bluff near the entrance to Los Angeles Harbor, so many cars were parked in what is usually a deserted area that time of night that it was difficult to find a parking place.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 9, 1992 | NORA ZAMICHOW, TIMES STAFF WRITER
San Diego scientists have analyzed comet dust and report today that--like so much in life--things are not what they appear. The analysis of comet dust, measured by spacecraft while Halley's comet passed near Earth in 1986, shows that comets are not composed of pristine material as scientists have believed, according to a report released today in a scientific journal.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 11, 1991 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Five years after its much-heralded but undramatic pass near Earth, Halley's comet has unexpectedly erupted with an immense dust cloud that makes it hundreds of times brighter than it was supposed to be. Before the eruption, the comet had been very faint--just an inert, potato-shaped dirty ice ball almost 10 miles long. Its tail had disappeared long ago. But last month, when it was 1.3 billion miles from the sun, astronomers saw that it had sprouted a shiny dust cloud about 180,000 miles across.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 14, 1990 | KRISTINE McKENNA, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Neo-Geo was a mid-'80s art trend that never really got off the ground. Also known as Smart Art, Neo-Geo referred to a refurbished style of geometric abstraction that incorporated elements of Appropriationism, Pop, Minimalism and Conceptualism.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 12, 1990 | LEE DYE, TIMES SCIENCE WRITER
A newly discovered comet is streaking toward the sun and could become the brightest comet in more than a decade. If it lives up to expectations, Comet Austin could make up for some of the disappointment left over from the lackluster performance of Halley's Comet in 1986. "It's brightening rapidly," said Stephen Edberg of the Jet Propulsion Laboratory, who coordinated amateur observations for the International Halley Watch. The comet, discovered Dec.
NEWS
March 30, 1989 | LEE DYE, Times Science Writer
Halley's comet, which has fascinated scientists and lay people alike because of its periodic and sometimes spectacular return to the Earth's neighborhood, may have originated somewhere beyond the solar system, making it truly a visitor from deep space, scientists reported Wednesday.
BOOKS
December 6, 1987 | David Brin, Brin has been a researcher in cometary science. His novels include "The Uplift War" and, with Gregory Benford, "Heart of the Comet," both from Bantam Books
Some years ago, the publisher of Del Rey/ Ballantine Books handed over the smallest advance payment ever for a book by a best-selling author--a $1 check made out to Arthur C. Clarke for an unwritten work tentatively titled "20,001: The Final Odyssey." Few science fiction sagas have been as popular as the exploration of mankind's destiny that Clarke began with "2001: A Space Odyssey." The ultimate chapter was eagerly awaited. Only Clarke was in no hurry.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 15, 1986 | MARC SHULGOLD
When Morton Subotnick conceived the idea of a musical ode to Halley's Comet, he knew from the start that an old-fashioned concert hall setting was simply out of the question. "I just love the fact of the sky and all the stars being right there overhead and all around," the New Mexico-based composer commented about the setting for the world premiere of "Return," which he will oversee on Monday night as part of the Chamber Music in Historic Sites series.
NEWS
August 9, 1987 | Compiled from Times staff and wire service reports
Scientists have found evidence that the gassy halo of Halley's comet contains tiny chains of formaldehyde molecules that may be older than the solar system. The evidence comes from data collected by the Giotto spacecraft as it flew by the comet in March, 1986, according to two papers in the current issue of Science magazine. Comets are considered remnants of the gas and dust that condensed to create the sun and its planets.
NEWS
May 10, 1987 | Compiled from Times staff and wire service reports
A new analysis of observations of Halley's comet confirms hints that its nucleus rotates every 2.2 days, a German scientist says. Previous evidence had suggested that information, but some scientists proposed a rotation of 7.4 days to match observed fluctuations in the object's brightness, said Klaus Wilhelm of the Max Planck Institute. The two lines of evidence can be reconciled by proposing a 2.2-day rotation with a slow wobble in the axis, he wrote in Nature magazine.
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