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NEWS
December 2, 1987 | DAVID VOREACOS, Times Staff Writer
The Environmental Protection Agency on Tuesday proposed new restrictions on two man-made chemicals believed to be depleting the atmosphere's ozone layer, which shields the Earth from the sun's damaging ultraviolet radiation. The proposed rules would cut production of chlorofluorocarbons, or CFCs, to 50% of 1986 levels by 1998 and would freeze halon gas at 1986 levels by 1994.
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BUSINESS
March 13, 1992 | DEAN TAKAHASHI, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Air Force has proposed banning ozone-depleting chemicals at its bases and government-owned defense plants by July because of growing fears about the erosion of the Earth's ozone layer. In an undated Air Force memorandum, Air Force Secretary Donald Rice proposes a ban--effective July 1--on the widely used toxic substances chlorofluorocarbons (CFCs) and halons. That date is much earlier than President Bush's proposed national ban on the use of CFCs by Dec. 31, 1995.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 4, 1991 | LEE DYE, TIMES SCIENCE WRITER
Robert Rodriguez was driving his Rapid Transit District bus along 3rd Street in Los Angeles when he heard a pedestrian yelling that the bus was on fire. Before Rodriguez could park the vehicle at the curb, an automatic fire suppression system put out the flames in the methanol-powered bus's engine compartment. No one was hurt. Damage totaled only about $50, despite the fuel's high flammability.
BUSINESS
October 23, 1991 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Du Pont Will Accelerate CFC Phase-Out: The giant chemical company announced that it will hurry its own timetable for ending production of chlorofluorocarbons (CFCs), in response to findings by the United Nations Environment Program and the World Meteorological Organization that stratospheric ozone depletion was advancing faster than expected. Du Pont said it would up its phase-out of CFCs and Halons by three to five years--to 1994 for Halons and 1996 for CFCs. William K.
BUSINESS
October 23, 1991 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Du Pont Will Accelerate CFC Phase-Out: The giant chemical company announced that it will hurry its own timetable for ending production of chlorofluorocarbons (CFCs), in response to findings by the United Nations Environment Program and the World Meteorological Organization that stratospheric ozone depletion was advancing faster than expected. Du Pont said it would up its phase-out of CFCs and Halons by three to five years--to 1994 for Halons and 1996 for CFCs. William K.
NEWS
June 16, 1990 | DAVID LAUTER and LARRY B. STAMMER, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
The Bush Administration, in a major shift on a sensitive environmental issue, announced Friday that it will support a proposed international fund to help Third World nations convert their industries away from chemicals that damage the atmosphere's ozone layer. The decision, announced in a statement by White House Chief of Staff John H.
NEWS
June 23, 1990 | LARRY B. STAMMER, TIMES ENVIRONMENTAL WRITER
When environmental ministers arrive here next week to wrap up a major conference on protecting the ozone layer, none will have more work cut out for them than William K. Reilly. Reilly, chief of the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, may well become the focus of attention--and the court of last resort--for many countries here who are urging the United States to change its position on a number of problems that have threatened the harmony of the conference.
NEWS
June 30, 1990 | LARRY B. STAMMER, TIMES ENVIRONMENTAL WRITER
Driven by disturbing new evidence of a widening hole in the Earth's ozone layer, representatives of 53 nations agreed Friday to ban major ozone-destroying chemicals by the year 2000. The deadline, established during a biennial review of an ozone-protection accord by treaty members that ended here Friday, marks a dramatic acceleration in the pact's previously scheduled 50% phase-out by 2000. The accord is known as the Montreal Protocol.
BUSINESS
March 13, 1992 | DEAN TAKAHASHI, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Air Force has proposed banning ozone-depleting chemicals at its bases and government-owned defense plants by July because of growing fears about the erosion of the Earth's ozone layer. In an undated Air Force memorandum, Air Force Secretary Donald Rice proposes a ban--effective July 1--on the widely used toxic substances chlorofluorocarbons (CFCs) and halons. That date is much earlier than President Bush's proposed national ban on the use of CFCs by Dec. 31, 1995.
NEWS
June 17, 1991 | Reuters
Large amounts of halon, a gas that can damage the Earth's protective ozone layer, were emitted during the Gulf War, a Swedish researcher sent by the United Nations to Kuwait said in an interview published Sunday. Arne Jernelov, a researcher with Stockholm's Institute for Water and Air Research, said that halon gas was sprayed into aircraft fuel tanks during refueling to minimize the chance of accidental fires. It was also carried aboard military vehicles in fire extinguishers.
NEWS
June 17, 1991 | Reuters
Large amounts of halon, a gas that can damage the Earth's protective ozone layer, were emitted during the Gulf War, a Swedish researcher sent by the United Nations to Kuwait said in an interview published Sunday. Arne Jernelov, a researcher with Stockholm's Institute for Water and Air Research, said that halon gas was sprayed into aircraft fuel tanks during refueling to minimize the chance of accidental fires. It was also carried aboard military vehicles in fire extinguishers.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 4, 1991 | LEE DYE, TIMES SCIENCE WRITER
Robert Rodriguez was driving his Rapid Transit District bus along 3rd Street in Los Angeles when he heard a pedestrian yelling that the bus was on fire. Before Rodriguez could park the vehicle at the curb, an automatic fire suppression system put out the flames in the methanol-powered bus's engine compartment. No one was hurt. Damage totaled only about $50, despite the fuel's high flammability.
NEWS
June 30, 1990 | LARRY B. STAMMER, TIMES ENVIRONMENTAL WRITER
Driven by disturbing new evidence of a widening hole in the Earth's ozone layer, representatives of 53 nations agreed Friday to ban major ozone-destroying chemicals by the year 2000. The deadline, established during a biennial review of an ozone-protection accord by treaty members that ended here Friday, marks a dramatic acceleration in the pact's previously scheduled 50% phase-out by 2000. The accord is known as the Montreal Protocol.
NEWS
June 23, 1990 | LARRY B. STAMMER, TIMES ENVIRONMENTAL WRITER
When environmental ministers arrive here next week to wrap up a major conference on protecting the ozone layer, none will have more work cut out for them than William K. Reilly. Reilly, chief of the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, may well become the focus of attention--and the court of last resort--for many countries here who are urging the United States to change its position on a number of problems that have threatened the harmony of the conference.
NEWS
June 16, 1990 | DAVID LAUTER and LARRY B. STAMMER, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
The Bush Administration, in a major shift on a sensitive environmental issue, announced Friday that it will support a proposed international fund to help Third World nations convert their industries away from chemicals that damage the atmosphere's ozone layer. The decision, announced in a statement by White House Chief of Staff John H.
NEWS
December 2, 1987 | DAVID VOREACOS, Times Staff Writer
The Environmental Protection Agency on Tuesday proposed new restrictions on two man-made chemicals believed to be depleting the atmosphere's ozone layer, which shields the Earth from the sun's damaging ultraviolet radiation. The proposed rules would cut production of chlorofluorocarbons, or CFCs, to 50% of 1986 levels by 1998 and would freeze halon gas at 1986 levels by 1994.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 22, 1997 | VERONIQUE de TURENNE
A false alarm caused the temporary evacuation of the Ventura County Sheriff's Department's crime laboratory shortly before noon Tuesday, county officials said. The alarm, attached to the lab's halon gas dispenser, went off at 11:55 a.m., said Renee Artman, interim manager for the lab. Halon gas is used to extinguish fires. Lab workers spent about 40 minutes outdoors as firefighters from the Ventura City Fire Department searched for a gas leak, Artman said.
BUSINESS
January 6, 1985 | HARIHAR KRISHNAN, United Press International
A computer tape in a trash container on the second floor of the company caught fire. By the time an employee called the fire department, the fire had spread and the computer crashed to the first floor. The firm, with no contingency plan for recovery of its lost data base, went bankrupt. An excited guest at a company New Year's party decided to sound the fire alarm at midnight for effect. Instead, he hit a "dump" switch, filling the computer room with fire-preventing Halon gas.
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