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Ham Radio Operators

CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 23, 1993 | ED BOND
If a major disaster strikes, it may fall to a small group of radio operators to help hold Burbank's rescue efforts together: the BEARS. The Burbank Emergency Amateur Radio Service, commonly called the BEARS, is a volunteer organization that would help supplement the city's emergency communications system, said Rich Baenen, the city's disaster preparedness coordinator.
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NEWS
April 8, 1991 | RONALD L. SOBLE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A group of ham radio operators in Long Beach made history Sunday when they successfully transmitted a television picture to the space shuttle Atlantis orbiting high above the planet. The five-minute transmission, some of it in color, included a relatively clear picture of ham radio operator Jim Steffen, 44, sitting on his living room couch in Long Beach with other ham operators as he talked to shuttle pilot Kenneth D. Cameron. "That was great," Cameron, himself an amateur radio buff, said.
NEWS
December 13, 2001 | Associated Press
The international space station's returning skipper marked the 100th anniversary of the first trans-Atlantic wireless contact Wednesday by chatting with youngsters at the exact spot history was made. Astronaut Frank Culbertson spoke for several minutes via ham radio to teenagers gathered at the Signal Hill National Historic Site of Canada in St. John's, Canada.
NEWS
October 2, 1991 | BOB POOL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
It was nearly midnight, and the argument between two ham radio hobbyists, Richard and Darin, was heating up faster than a transceiver with a short circuit. "Wait till I see you," yelled Darin, of Watts, accusing Richard, of Orange, of interfering with his radio transmissions. "You're gonna eat your words. . . . You're gonna get a taste of South-Central in your face. I swear to God--you haven't the slightest idea what you're dealing with here. You read about it in the news."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 17, 1997 | RUSS LOAR, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Cell phones? The Internet? New communications technology is all well and good, but after a quarter century as a licensed amateur radio operator, R. Dale Piedfort sees no threat to the community of roughly 2 million people around the world he affectionately calls "hams." "The Internet is a great tool--it works well in conjunction with radio--but it lacks the personal touch," said Piedfort, a 56-year-old salesman at Ham Radio Outlet in Anaheim.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 25, 1990 | ROSE APODACA
People from throughout the United States and Canada reached out over the airwaves Wednesday to touch students at Imperial Middle School during the school's annual Ham Radio Day. The event highlighted an unusual school course in amateur radio operation that is designed to turn children on to radio operation, as well as to electronics and geography. "We are one of the few schools with a ham radio course," Principal Betty Bidwell said.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 29, 1993 | JILL LEOVY
Elissa Mather's classmates know her as a freckled 16-year-old cheerleader at Alemany Catholic High School in Mission Hills. But on airwaves throughout the world, she is known as ham radio technician KB6WDL, one of the youngest members of the Los Angeles County Sheriff's Disaster Communications Service volunteer radio force.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 7, 2001 | STEVE CARNEY, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
WASHINGTON--Think of ham radio, and the image that crops up may be of a '50s whiz kid building his own receiver, or a retiree tapping out Morse code in some darkened room: at best an antiquated hobby. After all, why bother, when you can chat with someone a world away using the Internet? But that's the thing, amateur radio enthusiasts say; an Internet chat can't compare to an actual conversation with a new friend in a foreign country.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 4, 1994 | LESLEY WRIGHT
Stefan Leca left Romania with his fiancee, Lavinia Tatar, in August, 1992, to walk around the world. He had $3 in his pocket and wore the first of 50 pairs of shoes. Leca said he was concerned about the money but planned to rely on the thousands of friends he has around the world. Those friends, amateur radio operators, have sustained the couple. They include the Amateur Radio Club of Buena Park.
NEWS
January 11, 1988 | JAMES MARNELL
In Hull, Mass., residents must be wondering: "What hath God wrought?" They are hearing voices--from their radiators, ovens, toasters and aluminum siding. Consider Anne Scully, 69, who is more than a little disturbed by Diana Ross' singing of "Stop! In the Name of Love"--on her telephone. "It's a pain in the neck to listen to voices that are not of your choosing," Scully said. "I call it an invasion of privacy. I hear talk shows (from a bedroom radiator) all night long.
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