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Hamakua Sugar Co

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BUSINESS
December 21, 1992 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Sugar Company Calls It Quits: Hawaii's second-largest sugar plantation, Hamakua Sugar Co., will halt operations March 31 due to its overwhelming debt, the 109-year-old company announced. Hamakua will cease sugar production and begin liquidation of its assets in cooperation with its primary secured creditors, Western Farm Credit Bank and the Hawaii Production Credit Assn., which are owed $107 million, the company said.
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NEWS
March 19, 1994 | LOUIS SAHAGUN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The smell of molasses and a sense of gloom pervaded the cavernous Hamakua Sugar mill. The last cane to be grown on the plantation's 32 miles of coastline fields was being chopped, crushed, boiled and dried. "It breaks my heart because I have an emotional attachment to this place," said plantation general manager Ernest Bouvet, 73, who redesigned the mill in 1976. "When I do something, I give it my best. I did that here. I will miss the sugar life."
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NEWS
March 19, 1994 | LOUIS SAHAGUN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The smell of molasses and a sense of gloom pervaded the cavernous Hamakua Sugar mill. The last cane to be grown on the plantation's 32 miles of coastline fields was being chopped, crushed, boiled and dried. "It breaks my heart because I have an emotional attachment to this place," said plantation general manager Ernest Bouvet, 73, who redesigned the mill in 1976. "When I do something, I give it my best. I did that here. I will miss the sugar life."
BUSINESS
December 21, 1992 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Sugar Company Calls It Quits: Hawaii's second-largest sugar plantation, Hamakua Sugar Co., will halt operations March 31 due to its overwhelming debt, the 109-year-old company announced. Hamakua will cease sugar production and begin liquidation of its assets in cooperation with its primary secured creditors, Western Farm Credit Bank and the Hawaii Production Credit Assn., which are owed $107 million, the company said.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 17, 1995 | BRUCE DUNFORD, ASSOCIATED PRESS
For more than a century, sugar was king in Hawaii, a powerful force that drove the islands' economy and politics. Now, the dynasty's sweetness has gone sour. Where there once were tall stands of lush sugar cane spreading across thousands of acres, many fields are fallow, tarnished with a dry, yellowish stubble of scrub cane and weeds. West of downtown Honolulu, cane fields are giving way to sprawling subdivisions and a planned "second city" urban center.
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