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Hamas And Islamic Jihad

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 3, 2001
Israel has assassinated yet another Hamas leader and the condemnations worldwide are pouring in ("8 Killed as Israel Attacks Militant Site," Aug. 1). Never mind that most of these Hamas and Islamic Jihad members were let out of prison by Yasser Arafat 10 months ago. Israel told Arafat that it would only be a matter of months until the suicide bombings began, and they did. In the wake of these bombings, Israel begs Arafat to rearrest these people and he does not. They continue to plan and carry out bombings, and Israel is left with no alternative but to take matters into its own hands.
ARTICLES BY DATE
OPINION
March 19, 2003
Re "Israeli Bulldozer Crushes U.S. Activist to Death," March 17: Rachel Corrie's death is tragic, not because of how she died but because a young life was cut short. She stood in front of a house of a terrorist supporter. She fell and was unseen by the bulldozer destroying a house (property). The terrible accident followed. But where are the human shields who should be standing by the markets and bus stops in Israel protecting innocent Israelis who are killed or maimed by the hundreds by Islamic terrorist groups like Hamas and Islamic Jihad?
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OPINION
March 19, 2003
Re "Israeli Bulldozer Crushes U.S. Activist to Death," March 17: Rachel Corrie's death is tragic, not because of how she died but because a young life was cut short. She stood in front of a house of a terrorist supporter. She fell and was unseen by the bulldozer destroying a house (property). The terrible accident followed. But where are the human shields who should be standing by the markets and bus stops in Israel protecting innocent Israelis who are killed or maimed by the hundreds by Islamic terrorist groups like Hamas and Islamic Jihad?
OPINION
March 27, 2002
It is encouraging to read a joint appeal for peace signed by both an Arab American and a Jewish American ("The Only Hope for Peace," by George Salem and Marvin Lender, Opinion, March 24). It is more constructive to pave the way toward peace than to debate which side is more to blame for the calamity. The war of mutual destruction has gone on long enough and does not serve either side. It would be even more encouraging to read a similar joint appeal by Palestinians and Israelis to their respective constituencies.
OPINION
March 27, 2002
It is encouraging to read a joint appeal for peace signed by both an Arab American and a Jewish American ("The Only Hope for Peace," by George Salem and Marvin Lender, Opinion, March 24). It is more constructive to pave the way toward peace than to debate which side is more to blame for the calamity. The war of mutual destruction has gone on long enough and does not serve either side. It would be even more encouraging to read a similar joint appeal by Palestinians and Israelis to their respective constituencies.
OPINION
December 5, 2001
Re "U.S. Drops Calls for 'Restraint,' Backs Israel's 'Self-Defense,' " Dec. 4: Does Israel's right to defend itself include bombing the headquarters of the Palestinian Authority, the internationally recognized representative of 4.5 million Palestinians? Why is the killing of innocent civilians on one side considered an act of terrorism, while killing on the other side is considered an act of self-defense? Perhaps it is because, as Ari Fleischer said, Israel is a sovereign government, while the Palestinians have no government that confers upon them the right to self-defense.
NEWS
February 8, 2002 | DAVID MAKOVSKY, David Makovsky is a senior fellow at the Washington Institute for Near East Policy and a contributing editor of US News and World Report. He is working on his second book on the Middle East peace process.
How to deal with Yasser Arafat is a serious issue, one that Israeli Prime Minister Ariel Sharon and President Bush once again discussed in their meeting at the White House on Thursday. Sharon has publicly declared that he wants the U.S. to boycott Arafat because of the Palestinian leader's failure to halt suicide bombings and other terrorist attacks against Israel over the last 18 months. All the initiatives tried up until now--sticks, carrots and a combination of the two--have failed because they lacked one key ingredient: the political influence of the Arab states that also have a stake in the Palestinian issue.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 15, 2001 | HUSSEIN IBISH and ALI ABUNIMAH, Hussein Ibish is communications director and Ali Abunimah is a member of the American-Arab Anti-Discrimination Committee
The shocking spectacle of Palestinian police opening fire on protesters in Gaza--killing three--dramatized the exceptional dilemma facing the Palestinians in the aftermath of Sept. 11. With the exception of Afghanistan, it may well be that the Palestinians have both the most to gain and lose in the current crisis. The good news is that the U.S. has been forced to recognize that its relations with the Arab world are being shaped by its role in the Palestinian-Israeli conflict.
NEWS
September 1, 1996 | From Times Wire Reports
Defying Israel's hard-line government, Palestinian Authority President Yasser Arafat released 72 Islamic militant detainees after telling his people to hold on to the spirit of resistance against Israel. The 72 prisoners released from Palestinian Authority jails were all activists in the Islamic militant Hamas and Islamic Jihad organizations, said Azam Ahmad, Palestinian minister of public works.
WORLD
December 13, 2003 | From Times Wire Reports
President Bush signed legislation calling for economic penalties against Syria for not doing enough to fight terrorism. The legislation says Syria has provided a haven for anti-Israel groups such as Hamas and Islamic Jihad and has pursued biological and chemical weapons. It states that Syria must end its support of terrorists, terminate its 27-year military presence in Lebanon, stop efforts to obtain weapons of mass destruction and long-range missiles and stop terrorists from entering Iraq.
NEWS
February 8, 2002 | DAVID MAKOVSKY, David Makovsky is a senior fellow at the Washington Institute for Near East Policy and a contributing editor of US News and World Report. He is working on his second book on the Middle East peace process.
How to deal with Yasser Arafat is a serious issue, one that Israeli Prime Minister Ariel Sharon and President Bush once again discussed in their meeting at the White House on Thursday. Sharon has publicly declared that he wants the U.S. to boycott Arafat because of the Palestinian leader's failure to halt suicide bombings and other terrorist attacks against Israel over the last 18 months. All the initiatives tried up until now--sticks, carrots and a combination of the two--have failed because they lacked one key ingredient: the political influence of the Arab states that also have a stake in the Palestinian issue.
OPINION
December 5, 2001
Re "U.S. Drops Calls for 'Restraint,' Backs Israel's 'Self-Defense,' " Dec. 4: Does Israel's right to defend itself include bombing the headquarters of the Palestinian Authority, the internationally recognized representative of 4.5 million Palestinians? Why is the killing of innocent civilians on one side considered an act of terrorism, while killing on the other side is considered an act of self-defense? Perhaps it is because, as Ari Fleischer said, Israel is a sovereign government, while the Palestinians have no government that confers upon them the right to self-defense.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 15, 2001 | HUSSEIN IBISH and ALI ABUNIMAH, Hussein Ibish is communications director and Ali Abunimah is a member of the American-Arab Anti-Discrimination Committee
The shocking spectacle of Palestinian police opening fire on protesters in Gaza--killing three--dramatized the exceptional dilemma facing the Palestinians in the aftermath of Sept. 11. With the exception of Afghanistan, it may well be that the Palestinians have both the most to gain and lose in the current crisis. The good news is that the U.S. has been forced to recognize that its relations with the Arab world are being shaped by its role in the Palestinian-Israeli conflict.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 3, 2001
Israel has assassinated yet another Hamas leader and the condemnations worldwide are pouring in ("8 Killed as Israel Attacks Militant Site," Aug. 1). Never mind that most of these Hamas and Islamic Jihad members were let out of prison by Yasser Arafat 10 months ago. Israel told Arafat that it would only be a matter of months until the suicide bombings began, and they did. In the wake of these bombings, Israel begs Arafat to rearrest these people and he does not. They continue to plan and carry out bombings, and Israel is left with no alternative but to take matters into its own hands.
NEWS
February 18, 1993 | Associated Press
Two Palestine Liberation Organization activists agreed to be deported to Jordan for three years rather than accept arrest and imprisonment in Israel, according to Israeli and Arab reports Wednesday. Such expulsions generally occur after an Arab has been convicted, but the Israeli army apparently is trying to expand the use of exile as a penalty. By contrast, Israel forcibly deported more than 400 Palestinians to southern Lebanon on Dec.
WORLD
June 11, 2005 | From Associated Press
The Palestinian Authority has released two militants jailed in connection with a Tel Aviv suicide bombing, hoping to ensure that the Islamic Jihad militia abides by the truce with Israel, Palestinian officials said Friday. The release was part of a package of gestures that Palestinian Authority President Mahmoud Abbas made to militant groups Thursday after renewed violence with Israel.
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