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Hamid Karzai

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WORLD
November 3, 2009 | Paul Richter and Alexandra Zavis
Electoral officials today canceled Saturday's planned Afghan presidential runoff and declared incumbent Hamid Karzai the victor. The decision, announced by the government-appointed Independent Electoral Commission, ended more than two months of uncertainty stemming from an election that was marred by massive fraud. The U.S. and the United Nations quickly lined up in support of Karzai, who is to serve another five-year term. "We congratulate President Karzai on his victory in this historic election and look forward to working with him," the U.S. Embassy said in statement.
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OPINION
February 9, 2014 | By Sarah Chayes
If anyone is surprised that with each passing day Afghan President Hamid Karzai seems to veer more sharply away from the U.S. and toward the Taliban, it might be time to remember some history. Karzai himself was once asked to become a high-ranking member of the Taliban government. His every word and deed of late seems designed to appeal to the Taliban leadership and its backers in Pakistan, and to fracture the partnership between Afghanistan and the American people. In one recent display, he held a news conference for Afghan villagers who claimed U.S. bombing had killed a dozen neighbors on Jan. 15. They identified mourners in a photograph purportedly taken at a funeral the next day, Jan. 16. But it turned out the photo was from four years back.
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OPINION
November 10, 2009 | Max Boot, Max Boot is a contributing editor to Opinion and a senior fellow at the Council on Foreign Relations. His most recent book is "War Made New: Technology, Warfare, and the Course of History, 1500 to Today." He recently returned from a trip to Afghanistan.
Hamid Karzai begins another term as Afghanistan's president with a long to-do list. The Obama administration has made clear to him that he must crack down on corruption, install a team of technocrats to run the country and weed out warlords and narco-traffickers. Those are all important priorities, but there is something else he should be doing as well: acting as a wartime leader. So far, Karzai has been oddly disengaged from the war raging around him. Rarely if ever does he visit his own troops in the field, go to hospitals to comfort the wounded or honor the dead, as President Obama did so stirringly with his recent middle-of-the-night visit to Dover Air Force Base.
WORLD
December 19, 2013 | By Christi Parsons
WASHINGTON - President Obama is prepared to extend a Dec. 31 deadline in a concession to Afghan President Hamid Karzai aimed at getting him to approve a security agreement that would permit U.S. forces to stay in Afghanistan past 2014, aides say. The White House has warned for months that all U.S. forces will be withdrawn unless a deal is reached, and top advisors to Obama are increasingly comfortable with that prospect. At least two senior officials say the so-called zero option is strategically viable and politically acceptable, although it still isn't the preferred outcome.
NEWS
December 19, 2001 | Associated Press
New Afghan leader Hamid Karzai received the blessing of the country's exiled former king Tuesday and said he is determined to "fight terrorism to the end" and revive the war-wrecked economy. As if to underscore the importance of the moment, the 87-year-old king, Mohammad Zaher Shah, stepped outside his heavily guarded Roman villa for a rare appearance before reporters.
WORLD
August 27, 2009 | Associated Press
President Hamid Karzai extended his lead over his top challenger in Afghanistan's presidential election, new vote results showed Wednesday, but remains short of the 50% threshold that would allow him to avoid a two-man runoff. Afghan election officials are slowly releasing results from last week's presidential election, and final certified results will not be ready until at least mid-September, after dozens of serious complaints of fraud have been investigated. Low turnout and the fraud allegations have cast a pall over the vote, seen as crucial to efforts to stabilize the country, which is racked by Taliban insurgents and doubts over its fragile democracy.
NEWS
December 6, 2001 | TYLER MARSHALL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Afghans in the region had a mixed response Wednesday to the announcement that an urbane 43-year-old Pushtun tribal chief, Hamid Karzai, had been named to lead their nation's interim government. Here in Quetta, Karzai's home for much of the past two decades, residents were mainly enthusiastic about his selection by four Afghan factions meeting in Germany.
WORLD
June 15, 2004 | Paul Richter, Times Staff Writer
Supported by 18,000 U.S. soldiers and billions of dollars in aid, Afghanistan's interim government depends like few in the world on the United States. This week, the Bush administration is showing that it is happy to accept a little help in return.
WORLD
September 6, 2002 | CHRIS KRAUL and JOHN DANISZEWSKI, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
A gunman tried unsuccessfully to kill President Hamid Karzai on Thursday and was shot to death by the Afghan leader's U.S. military bodyguards, just hours after two explosions in a crowded downtown Kabul market area killed at least 24 people. Officials said they did not know whether the assassination attempt in the southern city of Kandahar and the explosions here in the capital were related.
WORLD
August 18, 2009 | Laura King
The dilapidated soccer stadium, a onetime Taliban execution ground, rang today with excited shouts of "Karzai! Kar-ZAI!" The chants weren't a signal of support for Afghanistan's beleaguered president. Far from it. They were the raucous response to a shouted question -- "Who's the one who failed at governing?" -- from a speaker warming up the crowd for Hamid Karzai's principal rival, Abdullah Abdullah. When the presidential campaign began two months ago, Karzai looked like the hands-down favorite to win a second five-year term.
OPINION
December 3, 2013 | By Sarah Chayes
He's done it again. Afghan President Hamid Karzai has startled and dismayed the world. After an arduous diplomatic process to define the terms of a future international presence in Afghanistan, he balked at the last second, like a white-eyed horse in front of a jump. Karzai was on board when the language of the Security and Defense Cooperation Agreement with U.S. negotiators was finalized on Nov. 19. Less than a week later, a gathering of Afghan elders, officials and community leaders (known as a loya jirga )
OPINION
November 29, 2013 | By The Times editorial board
After more than a decade of U.S. military involvement in Afghanistan - and almost 2,300 American deaths - many Americans would be content if this country reduced its troop presence there from the current 47,000 to zero by the end of next year. That's the point at which Afghan forces are supposed to take responsibility for internal security. But the Obama administration makes a persuasive case that some residual force is necessary to ensure that country's stability. After months of painstaking negotiations, U.S. and Afghan officials recently reached a bilateral security agreement designed, in President Obama's words, "to train security forces, and sustain a counter-terrorism force, which ensures that Al Qaeda can never again establish a safe haven to launch attacks against us or our allies.
WORLD
November 26, 2013 | By David S. Cloud and David Zucchino
WASHINGTON - U.S. officials seeking to close a deal by year's end on the future of American troops in Afghanistan are exploring ways to bypass the country's mercurial president, Hamid Karzai, who negotiated the agreement but now refuses to sign it. Frustrated by Karzai's abrupt declaration that he won't ink the deal before Afghan elections in April, the Obama administration has begun pushing for Foreign Minister Zarar Ahmad Osmani or another top...
WORLD
November 25, 2013 | By David Zucchino
KABUL, Afghanistan - From presidential candidates to grocers and spice merchants, many Afghans threw up their hands in frustration and exasperation with their elected president on Monday. They had watched Hamid Karzai on TV the day before, and many were baffled by what they saw. Karzai had brusquely rejected the recommendations of a special grand council he had personally convened to vote on whether Afghanistan should sign a security agreement with the United States. After the council, or loya jirga , enthusiastically endorsed the pact, Karzai refused to sign and launched an angry diatribe against the United States.
WORLD
November 24, 2013 | By David Zucchino
KABUL, Afghanistan - In a face-to-face rebuke to Afghan President Hamid Karzai, a grand council of Afghan dignitaries voted Sunday to recommend approval of a proposed 10-year security accord with the United States by the end of the year, agreeing to an American-imposed deadline. The white-bearded chairman of the advisory council, or loya jirga , told Karzai that he miscalculated by threatening a signing delay until spring. Chairman Sibghatullah Mojaddedi lectured Karzai, warning that if he delays signing, "I'll resign and leave the country.
WORLD
November 21, 2013 | By David Zucchino
KABUL, Afghanistan - He expressed outrage, sarcasm and black humor. He cast himself as a lonely voice defending his country's pride and sovereignty against American arrogance. After a frantic week of last-minute negotiations, Afghan President Hamid Karzai delivered a tepid endorsement Thursday of a proposed 10-year security pact with the United States in a rambling speech to an Afghan tribal gathering. But he then surprised attendees - and the world - by saying Afghanistan might not sign the accord until next spring.
OPINION
November 15, 2009
Re "Can the U.S. teach Hamid Karzai how to be a wartime president?," Opinion, Nov. 10 I always suspected that "Max Boot" was really the nom de plume of some comedy writer. In Tuesday's Times, he finally confirmed my suspicions. Boot suggests that President Obama send former President George W. Bush to Afghanistan to teach Hamid Karzai "how to be a leader in wartime." I don't need to explain why that's funny, do I? Robert Von Bargen Santa Monica :: The headline on this column should have read: "Can Karzai teach Obama how to be a wartime president?"
WORLD
May 19, 2006 | From Times Wire Reports
Afghan President Hamid Karzai said Pakistani religious schools were teaching students to go to Afghanistan to burn schools or medical clinics. He spoke in the eastern province of Kunar, next to the border. Pakistani Foreign Ministry spokeswoman Tasnim Aslam called the charges "baseless allegations."
WORLD
June 20, 2013 | By Hashmat Baktash and Mark Magnier, Los Angeles Times
KABUL, Afghanistan - Even as Afghan President Hamid Karzai this week canceled security negotiations with the Obama administration and suspended his involvement in the U.S. attempt to revive peace talks with the Taliban, the insurgents made some political moves as fleet-footed as some of their guerrilla tactics, analysts said. This comes as Afghanistan's neighbors rethink how their interests would be affected by a political reconciliation involving the Taliban, as much of a long shot as that seems.
WORLD
June 19, 2013 | By Hashmat Baktash, Mark Magnier and Kathleen Hennessey, Los Angeles Times
KABUL, Afghanistan - Afghanistan's president abruptly canceled ongoing security negotiations with the U.S., with his office charging Wednesday that the Obama administration had said one thing and done another while arranging peace talks with the insurgent Taliban movement. President Obama quickly rejected the criticism, saying, "We had anticipated that at the outset there were going to be some areas of friction, to put it mildly, in getting this thing off the ground. " President Hamid Karzai's reputation in Washington as a mercurial U.S. ally was further reinforced by his administration's decision, which came a day before U.S. officials were scheduled to begin direct negotiations with the Taliban.
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