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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 17, 1990 | MICHAEL PARRISH, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Southern California Edison and a condominium developer Tuesday announced plans to build a system to convert seawater to drinking water on Santa Catalina Island. It would be one of the first desalination plants on the West Coast. Hamilton Cove Associates, the developer, will build the facility in exchange for about 24 million gallons a year from the plant. The agreement will clear the way for a condominium complex Hamilton Cove is building on the water-poor island.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 25, 1991 | JENIFER WARREN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
For as long as anybody in the village of Avalon can remember, coping with a meager water supply has been an inescapable downside of life on Santa Catalina Island. Mayor Bud Smith figures the toughest years were the 1920s, when fresh water was shipped in 22 miles from the mainland by barge, and then dispensed to the populace from a horse-drawn wagon that rolled along Avalon's main street. "We'd all take our buckets down and fill up," recalled Smith, a retired pilot who was born on the island.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 25, 1991 | JENIFER WARREN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
For as long as anybody in the village of Avalon can remember, coping with a meager water supply has been an inescapable downside of life on Santa Catalina Island. Mayor Bud Smith figures the toughest years were the 1920s, when fresh water was shipped in 22 miles from the mainland by barge, and then dispensed to the populace from a horse-drawn wagon that rolled along Avalon's main street. "We'd all take our buckets down and fill up," recalled Smith, a retired pilot who was born on the island.
BUSINESS
January 29, 1990 | MICHAEL PARRISH, TIMES STAFF WRITER
When Southern California Edison and a condominium developer were planning their $3-million project to turn seawater into drinking water on Catalina Island, the technology they chose came straight off the rack. Increasingly efficient and time-tested methods of removing salt from water have made desalination reliable in more and more situations. All that has kept the decades-old industry from flowering has been the relatively cheap supply of bulk water from more traditional sources.
BUSINESS
January 29, 1990 | MICHAEL PARRISH, TIMES STAFF WRITER
When Southern California Edison and a condominium developer were planning their $3-million project to turn seawater into drinking water on Catalina Island, the technology they chose came straight off the rack. Increasingly efficient and time-tested methods of removing salt from water have made desalination reliable in more and more situations. All that has kept the decades-old industry from flowering has been the relatively cheap supply of bulk water from more traditional sources.
REAL ESTATE
June 17, 1990 | From Times Wire Services
Construction has begun on a desalination plant to convert seawater to drinking water on Catalina Island, according to the builder of the island's Hamilton Cove development, which is building the plant. The desalination plant will be a partnership between Hamilton Cove and the Southern California Edison Co., said James W. Oates, president of Whitehawk Partnership.
REAL ESTATE
March 22, 1992
ENCINO: Villa Palazzo, Villa Palazzo Inc., 25 condominiums, 2 bedrooms, 2 1/2 baths, 1,509-2,599 square feet; starting bids, $169,000-$219,000; $197-$234 homeowners monthly fee; open 10 a.m.-6 p.m. daily at 4630 Woodley Ave., No. 101; reached from southbound Haskell Avenue exit of Ventura (101) Freeway; auction to be held at 1 p.m. next Sunday at Sheraton-Universal Hotel; auctioneer, Real Estate Disposition Corp., (800) 266-4444.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 5, 1991 | RONALD B. TAYLOR, TIMES STAFF WRITER
For six months now, a third of Santa Catalina Island's freshwater supply has come from the sea in the first practical test of desalination technology in the state. The results, experts report, are encouraging. When the water-short islanders switched on a new 132,000-gallon-a-day desalination plant last June, the big question was cost. Other thirsty, drought-plagued cities along the coast were watching to see whether the $3-million, high-tech experiment would prove practical--and cost-efficient.
NEWS
January 8, 1989 | BOB WILLIAMS, Times Staff Writer
Santa Catalina Island, where a scarcity of fresh water has long been a major constraint on growth, may get its first permanent desalinization plant under a condominium construction plan approved last week by the Avalon City Council. If the project demonstrates the feasibility of such plants, the way could be opened for additional development at the arid island's two main population centers, Avalon and Two Harbors, according to some observers.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 6, 1989 | BOB WILLIAMS, Staff Writer
Santa Catalina Island, where a scarcity of fresh water has long been a major constraint on growth, may get its first permanent desalinization plant under a condominium construction plan approved this week by the Avalon City Council. If the project demonstrates the feasibility of such plants, the way could be opened for additional development at the arid island's two main population centers, Avalon and Two Harbors, according to some observers.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 17, 1990 | MICHAEL PARRISH, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Southern California Edison and a condominium developer Tuesday announced plans to build a system to convert seawater to drinking water on Santa Catalina Island. It would be one of the first desalination plants on the West Coast. Hamilton Cove Associates, the developer, will build the facility in exchange for about 24 million gallons a year from the plant. The agreement will clear the way for a condominium complex Hamilton Cove is building on the water-poor island.
NEWS
February 18, 1991 | THOMAS H. MAUGH II, TIMES SCIENCE WRITER
Faced with growing populations and a devastating five-year drought, communities up and down the coast of California are gearing up for the desalting of seawater to augment their dwindling water supplies. Desalination is a proven and effective technology that has been widely used in the Middle East and the Caribbean, but desalination of seawater has never been used in the continental United States because of its high cost compared to other sources of water.
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